Canada’s unwanted

The number of deportations is on the rise

In an age of online networks and fluid informational boundaries, it’s easy to forget that geographical borders still matter. But the case of Quran-burning pastor Terry Jones this week reminded us all that ours is a nation with a door, like any other, and it’s not open to everyone.

Canada Border Agency Services is responsible for denying passage to those ineligible to enter the country. This year, 14, 291 people were refused entry between the months of April and June. It might sound like a lot, but with 24,513,462 travellers processed in that time, it was only 0.06 per cent who were turned away (or three of every 5,000).

While significant data on annual entry denials was not forthcoming, searches through CBSA Departmental Performance Reports revealed other interesting details about Canada’s unwanted. As well as detaining incoming foreigners deemed a threat, CBSA is also given the task of hunting down and physically removing people who are in Canada illegally. And, it turns out, the number of those being kicked out is on the rise.

A jump of almost 7,000 people over a decade may not seem significant, but that difference represents a 75 per cent increase in removals. This is especially interesting considering that, as a trend, the total travellers processed each year has not increased correspondingly.




Browse

Canada’s unwanted

  1. huh. toss a bar graph in a blog and call it an infograph?

  2. That was fascinating information. I’m not sure what to make of it exactly, but I’m grateful you brought it to my attention.

  3. Arrivederci, Roma …

  4. I noted the steep rise since the Harper Government took over the Government of Canada.

    • I think “were elected” is the phrase you’re looking for.

    • I noted the steep rise since the Harper Government took over the reins of the Government of Canada.

      That’s better.

  5. A jump of almost 7,000 people over a decade may not seem significant, but that difference represents a 75 per cent increase in removals. This is especially interesting considering that, as a trend, the total travellers processed each year has not increased correspondingly.

    Since this data is about people who were in Canada illegally already (as opposed to people being denied entry at the border) is the relative number of travellers per year really a meaningful point of comparison? After all, some of those 15, 150 people removed in 2010/11 were likely already here in 2008, when the number of removals was much lower.

    To me, the trend-line of the number of people being denied entry would be the more interesting one. After all, some of the increase above is surely related not just to an increase in the number of people being judged to be in Canada illegally, but to the government getting through the backlog of people who were judged to be here illegally YEARS AGO who are only just now finally being removed from the country.

    I’d be interested to know how many of those 2010/11 removals were of people who came here illegally in 2010/11, and how many were people who had been judged to be in the country illegally years ago, and are only actually being removed now.

    • Thanks for the great thoughts! It would certainly be interesting to know how many people that were removed from Canada entered the country the same year. Perhaps that is information that could be gathered with a Access to Information request from CBSA.

      I also wholeheartedly agree that the number of people denied entry is a more interesting statistic; however, I was only able to find that information for one or two years in the past decade. I was actually quite surprised that the number of travellers denied entry each year was not included in the CBSA Departmental Performance Reports (because they often include the number removed and detained). I’m sure the CBSA has that data (and likely could be accessed by talking to them, or through an Access to Information request), but in the short time I have to gather relevant statistics about a timely news story, it just wasn’t possible to get.

  6. Love the graphic. I can hear the CBSA agent saying “And stay out!” Also the offender, skulking away, obviously embarassed. :-)

  7. I’m greatly in favour of more of these posts, posts with numbers, lots and lots of numbers. Granted, numbers can be misused and misinterpreted and so on, but I’d still prefer to try to figure things out aided by numbers rather than try without numbers.

    That said, as LKO elsewhere suggests, I’m confused:

    - are these figures only about entry denied at a border?
    - or do some of the figures include individuals who had entered days, weeks or years earlier? How many of each?
    - even though passenger numbers haven’t increased correspondingly, what are those numbers? Presumably they have risen somewhat.
    - how many of the ~93,000,000 passengers were Canadians returning to Canada? Presumably many, and presumably Canadians are rarely denied entry.
    - a 75% increase over 8 or 9 years isn’t such a huge increase.

    • Thanks for the questions, WilcoxPass. I love when readers really think about the data presented.

      You’ll notice that the graphic presents the number of people kicked out of the country, NOT figures about those denied entry at the border. I’m not sure, unfortunately, when those who have been kicked out actually entered the country. Finding the above data involved significant searching through various governmental publications and reports, which did not always provide consistent information or context.

      As for passenger numbers, you may find it interesting to know that no, the number of entrants to Canada has not risen. The peak for travellers in the last decade was 2005-06, with approximately 97 million people. The numbers have dropped from there, but not consistently.

      Here are the numbers (some are approximations based on CBSA daily averages):

      2010-11: 92,339,312
      2009-10: 85,890,895
      2008-09: 91,018,820
      2007-08: 96,000,000
      2006-07: 95,000,000
      2005-06: 97,100,000
      2004-05: 95,000,000
      2003-04: 92,000,000

Sign in to comment.