Great moments in Canadian humanitarianism

The homeopathy Denis Marier has brought to Haiti is what we had before real medicine

by Colby Cosh

I guess I’m slow on the uptake. I expected that the Globe & Mail would receive a flood of objections to, and ridicule for, Jessica Leeder’s cheerfully uncritical Feb. 27 blogpost about the activities of a Canadian “naturopathic doctor” who was rushed to Haiti by a charity to “help” with relief efforts. Instead, the paper has promoted Leeder’s story to the front page of its website. Denis Marier, whose own website proclaims him to be a “humanitarian”, brought 100 pounds of homeopathic medicines with him to Haiti; by his own account, this has enabled him to begin “administering homeopathic remedies to several children with scabies (Psorinum)”.

What’s psorinum, you ask? Good question! On the homeopathic “principle” that “like cures like”, practitioners sometimes apply what they call “nosodes”: these are diluted secretions from sick people, which may include excrement, blood, or diseased tissue. Psorinum is described in one favourable literature abstract as “an alcoholic extract of scabies, scrub, slough, and pus cells”. “Dr.” Marier has also been enthusiastically prescribing “pyrogenium”, an English homeopathic remedy that consists of diluted extract of rotten beef.

It’s all related to the “miasmatic theory” of disease, whose abandonment in the 19th century you may have heard some wild rumours of. I say “abandonment”; the truth, of course, is that miasmatic theory had to be positively bulldozed out of the path of Koch, Pasteur, John Snow, Ignaz Semmelweis, and other early investigators that we now, with all our hegemonic Western prejudices, regard as the first proper scientists in medicine. But Marier, evidently not one to take a hint, is passionately investigating the “application” of miasmatic theory to “relief medical work”. The charity that’s footing the bill for this experimentation—performed on human subjects who could not possibly be under greater duress, and for whom informed consent is inconceivable—is Hearts Together For Haiti, a troubled Catholic institution for which anointing sick children with pus may actually represent something of an upgrade, ethically.

Leeder, who is an award-winning investigative reporter, writes that “Integrating medical relief work with homeopathy is an approach that’s only in its infancy.” But homeopathy, in the form that Denis Marier practices, is what we had before real medicine: i.e., folk notions and metaphysical nonsense. Advocates of various styles of quackery always emphasize the great antiquity of their ideas, usually just as they’re about to complain that those same ideas have never been given a fair hearing by the Establishment. And characterizing something as “being in its infancy” implies that it is on course to grow into adulthood if uninterrupted by calamity. It’s precisely the kind of word choice a neutral reporter ought to avoid—I would say most especially when in the process of documenting the wasteful, possibly harmful activities of a delusional, selfish idiot.

Great moments in Canadian humanitarianism

  1. Glad that you picked up on this Colby. Actually it is proper science-based medical treatment that is in its infancy (perhaps more accurately adolescence) given that the transition to evidence-based medical treatment was not completed til the 1990's. Some readers might be interested to know that evidence-based medicine is a Canadian innovation (also claimed by the Scots and Americans, much like the telephone).

    • Wow, big pharma must be paying out a lot in overtime (on second thought, probably the equivalent of just one chemotherapy dose) on this hatchet-job article and planted comments on homeopathy. John D Rockefeller is probably smiling from his perch in the depths of hades.

      • No, everyone who disagrees with ME has been paid large amounts of money to tell lies. (Hey, this style of argument is easy 'n' fun!) How do you sleep at night knowing you're a paid liar, liar? (Debate WON! Woo hoo!)

  2. It never ceases to amaze me how self delusional people can be about their health. To believe that an eyedropper of bee pollen diluted in an olympic sized swimming pool several times over is going to make any difference, on the premise that the "molecular memory" of the pollen will somehow imbue the potion in a way that is meaningful is the equivalent of selling snake oil. Pure quackery.

    • But productive businesses can be shut down because they have 'toxic by-products" in the parts per trillion range?

      • Actually, no, they can't. Don't exaggerate. There are substances that can impact human health in the parts per billion range, however – nitric oxide in air, for example, can cause respiratory tract irritation.

    • Emergency medicine is the only discipline that modern medicine really shines in, just like the warmistas have a valid point that we shouldn't crap where we eat and drink…but that doesn't justify a whole regulatory scheme based on falsehoods that will cost trillions. Everything in moderation, everything is a poison at a certain dose.

    • That was funny!

  3. "evidence-based medicine is a Canadian innovation"

    This just reeks of kitsch.

    "it is proper science-based medical treatment"

    Oh please, tell us more, Liberal Stu, about how wholly unscientific snake oil – seriously – is in fact scientific. Hey, maybe you can tell us an anecdote. After all, anecdotes automagically prove everything.

    Between kcm's labelling evolution as a "theory", Stu's voodoo, and Mitchell's genius plan to robusticize Canadian IQ via African immigration we are slowly but surely outing the commenters here as the unscientific chumps they are.

    • Kitsch? I thought all you right-wing gals just loved kitsch?

      Plus, science isn't exactly your forte is it?

      http://www.thestar.com/living/article/773018–are

      In new research bound to irk conservative geniuses, people with high IQs are deemed more likely to be liberal, monogamous non-believers than those who are less intelligent.

    • Did you actually read what Stewart Smith wrote? Take another look.

  4. Homeopathic remedies are just water and sugar pills guys… Or at least they’re always placebos.

    It’s just water!

    • Lower X potency remedies (1 to 10) contains plenty of the original substance.

      Also check for yourself that homeopathy works on animals and plants. No placebo there….

  5. But wait! Despite the widely held consensus of the scientific community, what if there's a group of quasi-credentialled people with some "studies" who give us reason to believe that….sorry, got mixed up for a second. That was the anti-climate change argument.

    (and evolution IS a theory. So is gravity, and the sum of the angles of a triangle always being 180).

    • You are confusing THEORY and LAW and CONSTANT above.

      And the more the evidence points to "scientists" botching the science to say "the right things" (and hide "the wrong things") to earn the next grant, the more you might want to reconsider the climate change joke.

  6. I'm calling the stupid issue!

    • Seconded, with a hint of the Obnoxious Issue.

  7. It's early and I shouldn't, but…as a former natural health lobbyist the first time I ever heard the expression "evidence based medicine" was in Senator Evan Bah's office circa 2004 (sp. Indianana, aka Senator from Eli Lily). The expression was used by his health policy analyst, a former pharma lobbyist. I asked her the obvious question, "who gets to define evidence, patients or doctors?" You can guess the answer.

    It saddens me that a guy like you Colby who sees the fraud based on profit for insideres that is AGW, can't see the same process entrenched in medicine. The propaganda is identical, the appeal to authority. don't believe your lying eyes, trust us we're experts…yada yada yada.

    To me it has always been and will always be a property rights issue. Who own yuor body, You, or the state? Did you get your swine flu shot? If not, why not?

    If, in a country like Canada, where medicine is basicaly free, someone chooses to try a treatment on their body at their expense how is it anybody's business but theirs and their practitioners?

    • Just how many non-sequiters can be crammed into one utterance?

    • "It's early and I shouldn't, but…as a former natural health lobbyist the first time I ever heard the expression "evidence based medicine" was in Senator Evan Bah's office circa 2004 (sp. Indianana, aka Senator from Eli Lily). The expression was used by his health policy analyst, a former pharma lobbyist. I asked her the obvious question, "who gets to define evidence, patients or doctors?" You can guess the answer.

      It saddens me that a guy like you Colby who sees the fraud based on profit for insideres that is AGW, can't see the same process entrenched in medicine. The propaganda is identical, the appeal to authority. don't believe your lying eyes, trust us we're experts…yada yada yada. "

      **Gotcha – so, people you don't like believe something, therefore it must be wrong.

      cont'd

    • "someone chooses to try a treatment on their body at their expense how is it anybody's business but theirs and their practitioners? "

      **At your expense? Go for it. Just don't run around asking for funding a la NHS in Britain.

      It's quakkery, it's been debunked time and again. There's a reason why we it's called 'alternative medicine' – if it worked, we'd just call it 'medicine'.

      And to be hoenst – you didn't really make any points, so there wasn't much to refute.

      • I make no claim to how you should treat yourself and you are welcome to your choices. I deeply resent as totalitarian the State imposing your view of normal on me (and as an aside I also am not a big fan of "state" anything).

        In the market place of ideas any system of thought that needs the state to enforce its primacy is bankrupt. it seems that despite 4 centuries of bloodshed and fighting for freedom of thought and two examples taking root in North America are now water under the bridge and we are entering an age where insiders are allowed to dictate what i should think, read or research.

        As to trying therapies at my own expense, I do. Sadly the options are decling exponentially because the current parasites at the tax payer tit are reluctant to share their piece of the public pie and are visciously attacking all who challenge them on a global basis. By the by, for stuff that is "debunked time and time again" it sure seems persistant and in fact is the fastest growing trend in medicine.

      • I came back too late to say don't do it. The "peters" of this blogosphere will play bucket defence with you all day.

        • Or offer arguments not quite grasped by the skate board crowd. I hear they're working on a spray paint font, perhaps that will help you out.

          • lmao

          • And see my reply to your use of "ad hominum" (sic) above.

    • "To me it has always been and will always be a property rights issue. Who own yuor body, You, or the state? Did you get your swine flu shot? If not, why not? "

      **How this supports homeopathy is beyond me. You own your body – that doesn't mean there's any reason to put diluted pus in it to try and cure something modern medicine figured out years ago.

      "If, in a country like Canada, where medicine is basicaly free, "

      **It's not basically free at all. That's so daft a statement you should be ashamed of making it. Taxpayers pay every red cent for health care, it costs us billions in taxes every year, and some Homeopathic "doctor" shouldn't get a chance at any of it.

      cont'd

    • Sorry but the guy referred to in the article is applying his "treatment" to kids in Haiti, not consenting, informed adults. It's unethical and should nto be celebrated with a front page article.

      And your referring to a vast medical industry conspiracy doesn't hold up. Has every doctor, nurse, researcher, pharmacist for the past 100 years been part of the conspiracy or duped by it? Every study, clinical trial, successful treatment is part of this vast conspiracy.

      Given the overwhelming, documented, non-anecdotal evidence in favour of "western medicine" it's far more sensible to conclude that the purveyors of homeopathic treatments are misguided fools or frauds.

      • It's not the people, it's the system they are forced to operate in and the licencing schemes promulgated by the system that binds them. For a compelling verification of top down control look at the former Soviet Union and its influence on accepted orthodoxy…funny how two of their former leaders are now world leaders (Putin and Merkle).

        In fact this bully system of control is the norm, not the exception in human history. For God's sake look at Wall St. How many of those "masters of the universe" do you think are on the up and up? Look at the utter tripe in the business press about what is really going on. Do you think all those PhDs are just blind to the fraud? The regulators? No, they just do what people do when faced with an enormous flaw that none the less pays them well…nose to the grind stone butt in the air, making hay while the sun shines. All based on another unassailable theory of a revealed "accepted icon", Lord Keynes. Too bad they will soon be calling in their markers.

  8. Drive by slagging, please refute point by point if you see so many.

      • keep throwing s**t at the wall, some of it is bound to stick eh? Don't do any research or work or challenge any of your beliefs, just critcize and don't offer solutions…are you an Iggyite?

    • peter — you have a fundamental misunderstanding of evidence-based medicine. It's not about "who", it's about "how". Read this — http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evidence-based_medic… — and you might want to drill down on concepts like randomized, double-blind, etc.

      Then you turn this into some kind of individual right over your body when Mr. Cosh is referring to some nutjob going to Haiti to "help" people by putting pus on them. Hey, if you want to put this shit on your body when there is no evidence, (read the link to learn what evidence is), go right ahead. No one can stop you from being stupid, except you.

  9. I'm no expert, but I find it hard to believe that there's incontrovertible evidence for the effectiveness of homeopathic medicine.

    If I'm right about that, we should be going with what we know, not spending money and resources on speculative solutions that appear, at first blush, to violate the basics of modern medicine and the atomic theory.

    • I hate to appeal to a flakey source, but HRH The Prince of Wales, commissioned a study through the Prince's Trust, carried out by a senior corporate officer of Barklay's Bank that determined the widespread adoption of homeopathy in the NHS in the UK would reduce state health care spending by 30% and improve patient outcomes. I know, I know he's behind some scams, but homeopathy is the first choice of the Royal family and you've got to admit that they certainly appear long-lived and healthy.

      That said the usual suspects are reluctant to give up "their' 30% of that pie. BTW did you know that the AMA actually owns the Automated Billing Codes used in every private health insurance and medicaid transaction in the US?

      • I hate to appeal to a flakey source, but HRH The Prince of Wales

        Yeah, you can stop right there. Charles Windsor may or may not be king some day, but his views on science, medicine, religion, diplomacy and pretty much any other topic you care to name can be charitably described as upper-class-twit-eccentric. Would you pattern your medical regime on that of Howard Hughes? There's hardly a difference.

        • "upper-class-twit-eccentric"

          Which pretty much nails Maxime Bernier: empty suit, lousy judgment and utter gullibility toward global warming deniers.

        • . . . his views on science, medicine, religion, diplomacy and pretty much any other topic you care to name can be charitably described as upper-class-twit-eccentric.

          What to make of – the Minister of State for Science and Technology – Gary Goodyear's views vis-a-vis his responsibilities then?

          Among other questionable aspects of his performance, this excerpt from:

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gary_Goodyear

          Evolution Controversy

          In a March 2009 interview, The Globe and Mail asked Goodyear if he believed in evolution. He responded, "I am a Christian, and I don't think anybody asking a question about my religion is appropriate." While many scientists and educators expressed shock at this,[10] others defended the minister, citing statistics that show a majority of Canadians believe God played a role in creation.[11] Later that day, however, Goodyear said that he believed in evolution during an interview with CTV News.[12] However, when asked to clarify this belief, he did not say that he believed that evolution is the process that created the diversity of life on Earth or that we share a common ancestor with other species. This is important since many of the labs that are funded through Goodyear's department use these model organisms on the basis that they share a common ancestor with humans.[13] Furthermore, some scientists questioned the examples of evolution he gave in the interview, suggesting they represent lifestyle adaptations rather than evolution.

    • If ANY particular homeopathic product would work effectively against ANY particular ailment, you know what we would call it? A medicine. It is precisely because it has NEVER been shown to work in controlled studies that we leave it to the unregulated "as far as we know it won't kill you" crap section.

        • Check the homeopathic DINs registered at HC's NHPD website. Certified safe and effective by regulation. sadly for the homeopathic comunity they made a political decision to keep the Drug Identification Number (H) as opposed to the NPN (Natural product Number) number, making them junior partners in the drug world,

  10. I could care less if 40% of graduating MD's in California last year were "homeopathic" physicians. The fad is growing by leaps and bounds. The thing that bothers me though is that this hoodoo is creeping into veterinary science as well. If people want to be attended by witch doctors, that's their choice, but lets leave the medical treatment of animals to real science.

  11. And would have to be either proven to do so or be proscribed on the precautionary principle.

    • Read "The Brave New World Of Zero Risk"…it used to be free on line. The only thing the "precautionary principle" protects is continued hegemony for the status quoists.

  12. You're obviously bouncing off thwe walls like Tigger, pulling the trigger on your blunderbuss trying to scatter enough bait out there to get some one to play wiht you. I repeat: not worth the effort, scrappy-do.

    • yet you persist and still offer nada but ad hominum, I see you are revealing your reading list as well…we just celebrated A.A. Milnes 100th b day in my son's grade one class.

      • If you're going to use big words, it helps to spell them correctly and understand thier meaning.

      • For a full explanation of ad hominem you might do some googlating. In essence, it is comprised of a refutation of a premise by claiming the proponent is not credible by dint of some nefarious association or attribute. Remember your reference to me as an “Iggyite”? If you had then directly suggested my assertion/argument were flawed by that epithet, then that would have been ad hominem.
        In fact, I did not employ ad hominem rhetoric to discredit you. I simply asserted without reference that your statements were non sequiturs and unworthy of address.

  13. Note to Macleans:

    This kind of thing deserves to be on the front page of the website.

    (Replace Coshs Tiger article maybe?)

  14. So seductive that every pharma firm in the world is vying for patents on indications on natural source medicine. So seductive that at international standards setting agencies are trying to erect regulatory barriers that favor fat firms with no interest any innovation other than another IP goldmine…see SSRIs, statins and COX2 inhibitors.

    I'm not trying to tell you what to do. I am just asking you to respect my choices on my most personal of property and to divest your self of the notion that you are "righter" than me on something so profoundly personal.

    • Do whatever you want. Just don't a) expect me to pay for it, because there is zero, zilch, nada, none, no evidence it works, and b) cry about the fact that the stuff that does have evidence (and btw – the people who are allowed to say what evidence is are called scientists) is funded by the state because it tends to work.

      I'm not a fan of the state either – but if we're going to help people pay for medical treatment, it should at least actually work.

      • My point exactly. I've invested tens of thousands of hours researching this and spoken with thousands of experts over the years (many of them actuaries…read about any troubles in that field lately) and state health care has nothing to do with health outcomes and everything to do with business outcomes. Google "The Flexner Report" and see who funded it…ps their new scam is naked short selling…see deepcapture.com. While your digging check out the Swiss system, seems to work quite well with private insurance and lots of treatment choices, including natural.

        • Tens of thousands.

    • So seductive that every pharma firm in the world is vying for patents on indications on natural source medicine.

      Could it be possible that they are simply trying to corner the market on citizens who are, presently, not covered by the health care insurance system in the United States or elsewhere and are forced to seek alternative treatments, as well as the much smaller number of people who simply believe in or prefer alternative medical care?

      i.e. This is market driven motivation rather than medical science driven activity?

      • Yeah, in economics they're called cartels or oligopies. Kind of like the soviet system so many commenters here seem to favor, with just a touch of fascism. Oh, sorry you meant that as a good thing? You may wish to peruse the Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine if you think it's all hooey.

  15. If so-called 'evidence-based' medicine is so wonderfully effective, why then are there so many using homeopathy? Frankly, I think BOTH have their benefits. I have used homeopathy (successfully, I might add) many many times – in fact, avoided expensive pharmaceuticals, operations, etc. by doing so. I have also used conventional medicine and would do so IF I felt the need.
    I also believe that anyone who thinks homeopathy is quackery, is a bit of a 'quack' themselves…unless one personally tries it, one should never condemn something they know nothing about. Theories change daily on so-called 'evidence-based' medicine as well as our knowledge and understanding of how pharmaceuticals work (or don't, or cause side-effects).
    And lastly…where is the notion of FREE CHOICE. I will never accept a recommendation to take a pharmaceutical if I feel I can get better without (and homeopathy has definitely allowed me to do that).

    • A surprising amount of pro-homeopathy comments in here. A little disheartening truth be told – but thankfully I am young and have faith in my generations 'BS detector'.

      Melissa, both DO have benefits – I would direct your attention this article from the satirical website Cracked.com:
      http://www.cracked.com/article/161_6-things-your-
      and for those looking for something a little more 'prestigious':
      http://www.dontfeedtheanimals.net/2009/11/extrapo

      As others have no doubt mentioned, the PLACEBO effect is enormously powerful. All the power to your Free Choice, if it fixes your ills that is just great. But the focus of this article is in regard to Haitians being subjected to this 'medicine', and if they are being treated with this in place of … hell screw it, REAL MEDICINE, it is a god damn travesty.

      • With all due respect to Melissa, if I could give you multiple thumbs up I would.

      • Well surprises you eh? Maybe some reading – about high dilutions which still cause biological effects even though ALL the molecules of the stimulant have been diluted away, will explain it for you. Still under research and nobody knows why. Just water? As Dr. Rustum Roy put it, Diamond and Graphite are "just Carbon". But they sure have different properties due to their STRUCTURE.

        Now, about all that EVIDENCE based medicine – that gave us things like Thalidomide, Vioxx and Avandia – apparently all that "scientific" "evidence" does not quite make it some times, eh? Let's take the average 75 year old patient taking 4 or 5 or 8 pharmaceuticals a day (and probably feeling pretty crappy because of it). You don't SERIOUSLY think that there have been studies done, long term or short, on every possible combination of those drugs do you? How about studies, on HUMANS, for heart surgeries, chemotherapy, and other major operations and treatments? No? Well then I'd say that the "evidence" was a myth – manufactured by the corporatists and special interests to convince everyone to stay away from those cost effective and NON-TOXIC Homeopathy treatments.

        Placebo effect, eh? Well, try reading some Dorothy Sheperd MD books, and MD and Homeopathist of the WWll era who was regularly treating people for pretty bad falls, burns scrape, infections and a whole lot of other things in wartime London. If you think all of those were the "placebo" effect then there is a bridge in Brooklyn I'd like to sell you…. cheap.

  16. I think the real question here should be if homeopathic medical treatment is better for quake victims than NO medical treatment at all. Haiti is in a dire state of need, and I don't think they're in a position right now to be turning down medical assistance of ANY kind. Funny a bunch of folks sitting comfortably in Canada donating $5 to relief agencies via cell phone are criticizing a person on the ground, doing what he thinks best to help.

    • This ISN'T medical assistance of any kind. The fuel used to transport Dr. Pus to Haiti could have been used for legitimate relief supplies. And good intentions aren't help. Donating money to PROPER relief agencies is a LOT more useful than most of the things the average person could do if he were present, as most aid experts will be happy to explain to you.

      If your house fell on your head you would probably be quite clear, as the Haitians themselves seem to be, on the distinction between having a real doctor, engineer, or heavy equipment operator around and having a naturopath with a crate of injectable Vitamin C. You are arguing in favour of stupidity, which is much worse than being stupid oneself. "Assistant of any kind" indeed.

      • At the risk of generating your wrath, a humble suggestion…google "iv vitamin c" +infection. I'm not saying it's a panacea, but for heaven's sake Linus Pauling did win a nobel prize for his work with Vitamin C.

        There is tons of clinical data on efficacy and safety…and price wise,it is far less expensive than most current antibiotics.

        On Traumheel, the homeopathic referenced in the globe piece, about ten years ago I was given a sample at a trade show. Having kids who play soccer and get lots of owies, I tried it. When crying kids stop shortly after application, and next day swelling is significantly reduced one tends to become a believer. Of course no nobel laureats are flogging it. BTW naturopathic doctors have a very rigorous academic and clinical schedule.

        • "Linus Pauling did win a Nobel Prize for his work with Vitamin C"? I don't wish to wax gratuitously wrathful but you don't know what you're talking about. His Vitamin C research began more than a decade after he won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry, the citation for which you could use that Google thingie to look up.

  17. And, by the by, an anonymous internet surfer is in no position to make random assertions about how much anyone else has donated. It's an obviously illegitimate debating tactic. That moral high ground you've claimed for yourself is a pit of shame a million feet deep.

  18. If memory serves, Jessica Leeder wrote a series of articles in the Globe sympathetic to Deputy Commissioner Barb George just before or after she was found in contempt of Parliament. I believe the articles included some content that impugned the reputation of one of the whistle blowers, Mike Frizzell. I also believe some of the same content was stated by Barb George when she was interviewed by CFRA.

    The series abruptly stopped. While I would hate to cast dispersion on the 5th estate, one wonders if they aren't being hypocrites when they rightly take the government on for attacking public servants in public but remain strangely silent when it appeared that one of their own was abetting a attack of one public servant on an other.

    • Struggling to find a fact in that useless analysis.

      • Ah, well, I was just linking her current uncritical, fact-challenged writing with her previous uncritical, fact-challenged writing. Does that help?

  19. In the land of voodoo they need no help with natural medicine.

    • I know next to nothing about Haitian Vodou, so I checked:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haitian_Vodou

      After your Trudeau quote I was disposed to believe that there may be a gentleman in there somewhere. So, I'm curious why you would disparage Haitian religion? Particularly, it seems to me like you're kicking them when they're down.

      From what I can gather, it's Jesus who has the reputation for doing miracles. Vodou, not so much.

      I think you're a better man than this comment, In the land of voodoo they need no help with natural medicine.</" but I could be wrong.

      • I am not disparaging their religion.

        I really know very little about voodoo other than the stereotypical dolls with pins in them and the character from the last "Pirates of the Caribbean" movie. In pop culture voodoo is depicted as spiritual creatures and magical potions and chants, akin to witchcraft and mythology. That is what I am referring to, in a light hearted manner. Voodoo has a wonderful story-telling aspect to it. It's all over pop culture, from the "Live and Let Die" James Bond movie to the recent car commercial with the guy putting pins in the doll of his neighbour. And Haiti is traditionally the capital of pop-culture voodoo.

        Lots of pop culture has this quality. It's not disparaging their religion any more than Dracula disparages Romanian religion, or the Exorcist movie disparages the Catholic religion. I'm just kidding. Pop culture voodoo is wonderful and fun.

        I'm not a fan of Trudeau but I do believe he was absolutely correct with that statement I quoted.

  20. I can't believe homeopathic quacks are allowed to be anywhere near Haitians who need medical attention.

  21. "I expected that the Globe & Mail would receive a flood of objections to, and ridicule for, Jessica Leeder's cheerfully uncritical Feb. 27 blogpost about the activities of a Canadian “naturopathic doctor” who was rushed to Haiti by a charity to “help” with relief efforts."

    Perhaps not everyone uses their blog as their own personal soapbox. While she doesn't criticize, she doesn't endorse either.

  22. Great to see such a great humanitarian.

    I guess I'm slow on the uptake. I expected that the Globe & Mail would receive a flood of objections to, and ridicule for, Jessica Leeder's cheerfully uncritical Feb. 27 blogpost about the activities of a Canadian “naturopathic doctor” who was rushed to Haiti by a charity to “help” with relief efforts. Instead, the paper has promoted Leeder's story to the front page of its website. Denis Marier, whose own website proclaims him to be a “humanitarian”, brought 100 pounds of homeopathic medicines with him to Haiti; by his own account, this has enabled him to begin “administering homeopathic remedies to several children with scabies (Psorinum)”.

  23. incredibly unhealthy. I just found out about homeopathy.

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