Why Michael Ignatieff is hard to find these days

He’s the fourth Liberal leader since Chrétien. This in a party that once took 81 years to burn through that many leaders.

Why Michael Ignatieff is hard to find these daysWe are pleased with reports that the New Democratic Party is thinking of dropping “New” from its name. This is welcome news. No “New” is good news, you might say. Yes, you’re right, you probably wouldn’t say it, but you might. I am younger than the New Democratic Party and absolutely nobody thinks of me as New Paul Wells. Well-Preserved Paul Wells, maybe. Rumpled and Lovable Paul Wells, if you insist. No, really, go ahead, I’m powerless to stop you. But not New.

The downside with the whole N-less DP thing is that dropping the New would leave “Democratic Party,” leaving the party of Tommy Douglas and Alexa McDonough semantically indistinguishable from a party which (a) supports parallel public and private health care systems—“two-tier medicine,” as it’s sometimes called; (b) overwhelmingly supported the Iraq invasion in 2003; (c) is American.

So perhaps they should call themselves the Canadian Democratic Party, to avoid confusion. Or they could go with Progressive Democratic Party, because then the campaign ads will write themselves: “If Stephen Harper’s party no longer wants the word ‘Progressive,’ we’ll take it.” Swiping “Progressive” from the careless Conservatives would be sure to make the new PDP a hit with the sort of people who fill out crossword puzzles. And they’re an important demographic. I mean, for one thing, the crossword-puzzle crowd almost always have their own pencils in hand when they show up to vote. Word to the wise.

But I digress. We especially like the NDP’s proposal to drop (or amend) its initial initial because it is news, if you’ll forgive the word, and this summer in Ottawa we have had very little of that. Which helps explain why Bytown political types have spent weeks debating whether Stephen Harper ate a communion wafer at the Roméo LeBlanc funeral: it gives us something to talk about.

Unfortunately the communion-wafer controversy achieved the result that truly weird stories generally do in polarized political environments. It allowed all observers to conclude they had been right all along. The Prime Minister was videotaped receiving a communion wafer but not eating it. Weeks later, the New Brunswick Telegraph Journal announced that its coverage of that moment included non-factual bits inserted in the editing process, fired the paper’s editor and suspended its publisher.

This is a Rorschach event: the conclusion you draw tells us more about you than about the event. Harper’s detractors viewed the whole thing as proof that he is wicked. Harper’s defenders decided it was proof the media are out to get him. Over on our Maclean’s blogs, much arguing ensued, and when it was done nobody had changed anyone’s mind. Surely this is a metaphor for something.

Soon we will return to our absolute favourite pastime, guessing the date of the next election. Will it be in the autumn, or later? We love that sort of question in the parliamentary press gallery, because the answer cannot be known, so information is irrelevant, so not knowing anything is not a handicap.

And yet. Whenever an election does come, a few facts may turn out to be germane.

Pollsters often look at so-called “right track/ wrong track” questions as a handy proxy for a government’s chances of being re-elected. In the latest CBS/New York Times poll, 42 per cent of American respondents believed their country to be on the right track, as opposed to 49 per cent who said wrong track. These numbers are much better than when George W. Bush was president but still represent a net seven-point wrong-track advantage. In the most recent Ekos poll to report an answer to the comparable question, 55 per cent of Canadians said right track and only 34 per cent chose wrong track, a net 21-point right-track advantage.

You will perhaps be unsurprised to learn that Barack Obama is more personally popular with his electorate than Stephen Harper is with his— 58 per cent job approval vs. 30 per cent disapproval for Obama in the CBS/Times poll, whereas 49 per cent in the Ekos poll feel Harper’s government is “moving in the right direction” and 39 per cent believe it is “moving in the wrong direction.” But in a Canadian system with five parties, you don’t need massive job approval to win.

Ekos found the Harper government’s “right direction” numbers exceed his “wrong direction” numbers in every region except Quebec, both genders, every age bracket and at every level of educational attainment. Forty-two per cent of Liberal voters reported they believe the Harper government is moving in the right direction.

This government would be very difficult to beat if seasoned professionals were attempting the task. And there is no longer any such thing in the Liberal Party of Canada.

Michael Ignatieff is the fourth Liberal leader since Jean Chrétien left office in 2003, if you count Bill Graham, who filled in as interim leader for most of 2006. Before that, from Pierre Trudeau to Chrétien and counting interim leader Herb Gray, it took the Liberals 35 years to go through four leaders. Before that, from Wilfrid Laurier through Lester Pearson, four leaders lasted the Liberals 81 years. The pace of change—well, who are we kidding, call it chaos—that has racked the Liberals in this decade is unprecedented in their history. Much has been made of Ignatieff’s low profile this summer. Maybe he is measuring the scale of the challenge he faces. You’d hide too.




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Why Michael Ignatieff is hard to find these days

    • Somebody needs to give Iggy a lesson on controlling his facial contortions. Most of the pictures we see these days in the media are God awful. He looks like Satan reincarnated. My wife says he looks evil and in fact he reminds her of the Christmas Story The Grinch Who Stole Christmas with Iggy in the starring role looking down at the people in Whoville with a menacing look.

      • I take it your wife doesn't like intellectual men. Some do.

        • Y.U.P.B. – on second thought I am not going to comment after all what with discretion being the better part of valour and being male.

        • It has nothing to do with intellectualism. When will you Liberals understand that Canadians don't care how intellectual he may think he is, how many books he has written or how many TV shows he hosted in Britain.

          It has to with… does he understand our country, does he really care about the country, what qualifies him to be the leader of our great country, does he understand how the federation works, does he know anything about economics. You know stuff that affects the lives of everyday Canadians.

          So continue to promote his intellectualism and you will find more Canadians turn off the Liberal party. Spouting his "intellectualism" simply confirms in their minds he is an elitist, arrogant and is simply trying to enhance his resume.

          • does he understand our country, does he really care about the country, what qualifies him to be the leader of our great country, does he understand how the federation works, does he know anything about economics.

            If these things matter so much to Canadians how is it that Harper managed to become the Prime Minister of Canada when he doesn't understand our country, doesn't really care about our country, is unqualified to be the leader of our great country, doesn't understand how the federation works and doesn't know anything about economics.

          • So then YOU explain why Stephen Harper was ELECTED to run this country Robert, if your rant is true.

            And explain too why 54% of Canadians think this country, AND the Government running it, are headed in the RIGHT direction.

            Seems to me it is YOU who are offside with most Canadians, not Harper.

          • So then (can) you explain how Stephen Harper was ELECTED to run this country? I thought he was elected as a MP for Calgary-Southwest and elected by CP members as their leader.

            Im not an expert on polling but I would imagine it might not necessarily mean much when comparing the right/wrong track question across countries, as that Americans are different from Canadians and have different perceptions of government in general. I would be curious to see how the right/wrong track question tracks over time to Canadians.

          • Hey, your post was about your wife's facial preferences, not about our country, but I see mentioning the idea that some women are turned on by brains is a touchy topic for you. I understand.

          • Heh.

  1. Kim Campbell, Preston Manning, Jean Charest, Deobrah Grey (Interim), Stockwell Day, John Reynolds (interim), Joe Clark, Peter Mackay, Senator John Lynch-Staunton (Interim), Stephen Harper. Ten leaders (if you count Harper once) and two parties in 13 years.

    Since we've managed to remain one party, perhaps we can do it in half the time with less than half as many leaders. I would note that the Conservatives eventually acheived success by not changing their leader between elections.

    • Actually Jason – they had 3 parties – Reform, CCRAP and Conservatives. You could say four by adding Progressive Conservatives

      • Don't forget the United Alternative … oh, and what about Monte Solberg's mariachi band when they were hounding that AWOL Liberal Senator who lived in Mexico. That was considered a party too, wasn't it ? Loved the sombreros.

    • Give us a break Jason the Liberal party is suppose to be the natural governing party of Canada as they are want to remind us. Wells is absolutely right. The party is in dissaray with even some of its senior former MPs deciding they did not want to lead the party. So the party, in their desperation, had to import, a pretend Canadian. The Liberal party seems to be looking for a saviour and it is not working out too well for them. Doesn't matter how much you point to the other guys the fact is the Liberals are in big trouble organizationally and financially.

      • Assume the "disarray" ends eventually. We won't know for sure until the Liberals win an election, right? So it might even be over already, but there is no way to prove it.

        I'd also add that as the Conservatives are losing all their "experts" (if there is such a thing in politics), it seems like a more even playing field every day.

        • The operative word is "eventually". I would hardly call Kory an expert. He has one year's experience. Carolyn was with Harper for a long time but without knowing her duties I don't know how "expert" she is. Nice spin though. You haven't lost your touch.

          I seem to recall Iggy cleaned out his office after he took over from Dion. Maybe he lost all of his experts simply because they worked for Dion. It may also explain his foolishness at the end of the parliamentary session. Bad advice or no advice. You be the judge.

        • The operative word is "eventually". I wouldn't hardly call Kory an expert. He has one year's experience. Carolyn was with Harper for a long time but without knowing her duties I don't know how "expert" she is. Nice spin though. You haven't lost your touch.

          I seem to recall Iggy cleaned out his office after he took over from Dion. Maybe he lost all of his experts simply because they worked for Dion. It may also explain his foolishness at the end of the parliamentary session. Bad advice or no advice. You be the judge.

          • Even the most shameless partisan — yes, I guess I do mean hollinm — would admit that Iggy's getting a hell of a lot better advice than Dion got. Or maybe I'm wrong, and the most shameless partisan won't admit it.

          • so are you saying that Harper surrounded himself with amateurs to lead this country?

    • Yeah, but, uhh…should we really be striving to duplicate the success of Canada's right wing in the 90s?

      • And successfully unite the left? You wish.

      • That's what I'm hoping for CG. And we will need it to get out if this deficit.

    • Jason, I'm curious how you feel about Iggy's performance so far. I know you were never much of an Iggy fan before his hasty coronation. Has Iggy's vigorous leadership style won you over?

  2. We are pleased with reports that the New Democratic Party is thinking…

    How come I haven't seen these reports that the New Democratic Party is thinking?

  3. Paul

    I think we expect more from you. Seems to me, and I find this omission quite telling, that it's newsworthy when a Liberal leader visits an area of Quebec for the first time in YEARS. There hasn't been ONE english media story on the tour, not even a mention. Instead, we get you piling on the lazy media angle. I don't get it.

    • I think this was Well's way of saying he expects more from Ignatieff.

    • Paul is the most fence sitter Media Myth in Our times.. yes we would expect more from him….

  4. Most of the commentary in this piece is fair.
    By framing it in this silly "where's waldo" theme says the author has been spending too much time inside a media bubble.

  5. He was in Europe doing a speech, out west, all through Quebec, Calgary Stampede, doing fundraisers, etc. – hiding?

    • Any leader of the official opposition potentially heading into a fall election who runs to Europe to make a speech to his buddies has his priorities screwed up and shows he is politically naive. This is compounded by the fact he is a relatively new leader and is not well known to Canadians other than through the Conservative truth ads. It also adds to the impression that he is an elitist who could care less about getting to know the country during the summer break.

      • Politically naive, eh? Perhaps it's more a matter that this guy knows that Canada is a player in a multinational and multifacetted world, and that engaging other international players is critical to establishing credibility and a positive relationship for when he eventually takes office.
        Of course this contrasts strikingly with the Stephen Harper method of international relations, which plays exclusively to the home audience at the expense of any real engagement with what would once have been described as our peers on the international stage, relying heavily on gratuitious smears against his domestic political opponents while on an international stage. Then telling us all how Canada's back.
        I encourage Ignatieff to speak more on the international stage at every opportunity, just so Canada can maintain some measure of credibilty internationally under this group of clowns are booted from office.

      • Hello – the subject was that the media have been saying Iggy has been missing all summer – when he hasn't.

      • I for one am thrilled not to have these guys on the front page everyday. Insiders have been critical of Ignatieff….but maybe he's taking a lesson from Stephen Harper and actually waiting until the election. The need for photo opps and fish frying all summer long is highly overrated.

    • When you are doing all these photo ops, shouldn't someone be taking the photos? Fat lot of good it does to be promoting yourself when nobody's watching.

      The grassroots find Ignatieff irritating and creepy

  6. I once had an editor look over a piece I'd written. It was summer, nothing was happening, and I had a hole to fill. I looked around for inspiration and, finding nothing, grasped at a few old-news events, and made a few ill-advised connections in my editorial. My boss handed it back to me with the parting comment, "When you've got nothing to say, don't say it."

    I feel for you, Wells.

    • You're lucky, I would have told you that if you had nothing to say you should look for a new job. Aside from that, this isn't a nothing to say column. Every so often Wells writes one of these little trolls so he can. I'm sure, sit back and watch the amusing reactions. This is a particularly good one. It snagged three quarters of the wailing liberal quartet.

      • Come on, he's all over the map on this one. It's an incoherent mess. As a non-subscriber to a magazine I haven't purchased in a dozen years, I want more out of this particular columnist I get to read for free!

        • Kaplan's eerily insightful today. I hope this column has a bit of wit to it, but it's perfectly fair to characterize it as a dead-of-summer column.

          • I loved your column, Paul – Both the content and style. The "Rorschach" reference was excellent too.

            Of course my endorsement will not endear you to the Iggophiles.

  7. Shouldn't the NDP be calling themselves the Labour Party, or Union Labour Party or Kitchen Table party or something. That's closer to what they really are.

    • I like the "Kitchen Table Party" idea, but I fear it might confuse those who don't have tables in their kitchen.

  8. Yeah Jason, by going through all those leaders, that was proof that those were troubling times for Conservatives, and their supporters. We've put that all behind us now. Now your having your turn. The thing is, are you guys going to get over it, too?

    Not likely any time soon. The way I figure it, Ignatieff has one more chance to climb up on a hill (eg: EI) and make a stand. If he climbs down AGAIN, he is toast; Dion, Part Deux. Mr. Wells has nailed it bang on – if I were Ignatieff, I'd hide, too.

    • In a month's time, you won't be hearing much about EI. By the time November rolls around, it'll be a distant memory.

    • I hear the LPC out fund-raised the CPC in Q2. I think the Liberals are well on the road to recovery. That doesn't mean they are ready to defeat the government in the Fall.

  9. How about just the "Party of Mental Socialists" or PMS?

  10. I'm struck by how many people are fixated on the line about Iggy hiding, which is indeed a cheap shot, but perhaps survivable, and how nobody has mentioned this paragraph:

    "Ekos found the Harper government's “right direction” numbers exceed his “wrong direction” numbers in every region except Quebec, both genders, every age bracket and at every level of educational attainment. Forty-two per cent of Liberal voters reported they believe the Harper government is moving in the right direction."

    I'm not sure numbers like that go away if you ignore them.

      • Take that comment to heart Paul. If there is one thing Joanne knows, it's denial.

    • The title might have betrayed what you found important :)

      As for ignoring that data, I sure haven't. Angus Reid has also shown Harper's numbers improving- last offering he had his best numbers on approve/disapprove his handling of the economy. Given that this issue is sure to be the central theme in an election, that trend is worrisome.

      Dispense with the "cheap shots", then we can talk shop.

      • The title (“headline”) reflects an editor's best attempt to find six words to sum up the whole column. Not for the first time, I didn't make the desk's job easy.

    • "Forty-two per cent of Liberal voters reported they believe the Harper government is moving in the right direction."

      Not at all surprised that forty-two percent of Libs think Cons are moving in the right direction because there is little difference between the two parties at the moment. Someone is going to write a Tragedy about Harper's government one day because he has squandered so much, for so little return.

      • "Someone is going to write a Tragedy about Harper's government one day because he has squandered so much, for so little return."

        Ahem.

        Wouters
        Another morn I greet, another road
        Whereof the destination I know not,
        Save that, though every flinty step be hard,
        At last a gracious God will show the way.
        But come, who's this? Hail, Giorno, and well met!

        Giorno
        All hail, good Clerk. But what's your bulky file?

        Wouters
        Herein are written all the subtle schemes
        For bettering the fate of Canada,
        For laws, reform, in short for legacy,
        Which presently I'll show to the PM.

        Giorno
        Alas! to speak to one that hears you not
        Or play charades before a man born blind
        Would be as futile as this earnest wish.

        Wouters
        Come, come, what dire news of woe is this?

        Giorno
        The man whom lately pundits reverenced,
        Whose bright agenda, like a heav'n-sent flame,
        Once lit the hearts of all from sea to sea,
        Hath lately stumbled into that deep slough
        Which wiser men than we have named Despond.

        Wouters
        Doth he lament yet for that sweater-vest
        Of baby blue which pitiless moths devoured?

        Giorno
        For that, and for his hockey book, for all
        His garden's fruit that withered in the frost.

        Wouters
        Speak not in riddles, nor in metaphor.

        Giorno
        In times like this a man circumlocutes.

        Wouters
        But wherefore moths, and frost, and hockey book?
        And whither his polit'cal capital?
        Say not some thief, some Baird, some Pollièvre,
        Hath filched what Harper's patient hoard accrued? . . . .

        • Wonderful. I enjoyed that.

          • Thanks, jwl! Ask and ye shall receive!

        • I laughed out loud at the "vest of baby blue which pitiless moths devoured" –great job Jack!

        • Nicely done, Jack.

    • The Ekos poll is just one poll, but if a few more come in that reflect similar numbers on these questions, I just don't see the LIberals pulling the plug this fall, unless those late summer mornings start giving Iggy the nostalgia for Haaaaaavard – pulling the plug would be the surefire way to get there.

      Those "right direction" numbers have to be sobering, if not depressing to the Liberal brass. This ain't quite fallin' in their lap like they though it would last January. The passive, playing possom Liberal tactics will have to change.

      • Rex Murphy in today's Globe makes the point about the mistaken Liberal strategy:

        "There is something, however, in the Liberals' approach that suggests that, maybe from their long habit of being in power, they expect it will be theirs again simply by default. Maybe that's why Mr. Ignatieff has had, in terms of visibility and profile, so relaxed and ruminative a summer. Maybe he or his party don't think much work is required, that they also win who only sit and wait. This is an error."

        • That is such an unbelievably shallow comment .

          It doesn't surprise me that sharing your thoughts publicly more frequently is Murphy's idea of working hard.

          I look forward for a time when an editor at the Globe and Mail has the balls to edit its columnists work.

    • In politics, patience is only something you tell others to have.

      It would be silly of Michael Ignatieff to force an election over EI. He will be crucified on it (9 weeks of work for 52 weeks of pay!) The communications machine is already moving.

      The Liberals need to wait until they have something legitimate to object to.

      I can see them winning election on one of two things (or a combination of both):

      (1) If stimulus spending went disproportionately to Conservative riding

      (2) If they prove that only a small fraction of stimuls spending has been spent.

      • They'd win on neither of those two things. The first is standard pork-barelling that everyone knows everyone does (and why would people in Conservative ridings vote against it?) and the second would be cheered given it means the deficit will be smaller. The Liberals best shot at winning is having the recession drag on and on.

      • If those truly are the best two scenarios for the Liberals they are in for some tough sledding.

    • I agree, numbers like that don’t go away if you ignore them.

      But we’re not in an election campaign right now. I expect the Liberals will have something to say about the failure to roll out stimulus funds, the failure to make a serious attempt at EI reform during a season of high unemployment, the social-conservative heebie-jeebies over the funding of gay pride events, and other public issues. (medical isotopes? anti-immigrant grandstanding?)

      Right now, I don’t think Canadians are tuned in. But when the election campaign begins, there will be a receptive audience for such concerns. The numbers you cite can’t be ignored, but they aren’t chiselled in stone, either.

      • I'm afraid it still surprises me that people still think pre-writ periods are dead times for politics. The Liberals have lost two elections in a row before they “began.” Anyone for three?

  11. Voters are happy to see Stephen Harper's popularity failing, and his party falling apart. Of course they are going in the right direction! Down! lol.

    • Uh, I'm not sure how the Ekos "right direction" numbers that Wells highlighted supports your assertion that the Conservative Party is "falling apart".

      • I think that assertion was made up long before the Ekos poll. I think it was made when the Parliament was still in function and scandals and dissent were appearing left and right. It did seem at that time that Harper was losing control of his party members. It just makes the results of this poll sound weird.

    • Appleseed your a Liberal with idiot Liberal comments.Let the MSM make up the lies.You wish PM Harpers popularity would fall,but no as usual it,s the stupid Liberals who go down again.Keep up the lies though and the newspapers might give you a job writing fiction.

  12. Other than Harper's anti-gay shots, his secrecy, his disrespect for government and most Canadians, his uber-partisan attack style, and the fact that his stimulus has little focus (a second order effect compared to no stimulus or stimulus), at the moment, what Harper is doing is not so different than what a Liberal government would be doing – namely, attempting to stimulate the economy and trying to keep consumers' confidence up. As we know, he was driven to this by the opposition, although the details and the style are all his.

    So, exactly what is surprising about the right-wrong direction results? I doubt this means that more Canadians trust him or respect his style or attitude.

    • So, exactly what is surprising about the right-wrong direction results? I doubt this means that more Canadians trust him or respect his style or attitude.

      Uh, if half of the Canadian population think that the PM is moving in the right direction, that's generally good news for the governing party and bad news for the opposition parties.

      Also, I don't think too many Canadians were offended by the PM's "anti-gay shots", since they're a figment of your imagination.

      • your right Crit,a typical Liberal line.If they cant talk intelligently they make up stories.

    • "So, exactly what is surprising about the right-wrong direction results?"

      Most people think the government is on the right track and we're still in the middle of a recession.

      "I doubt this means that more Canadians trust him or respect his style or attitude."

      Well, Harper doesn't need more Canadians to trust him or respect him. He just needs them to vote for him. And if you think the person in charge is on the right track, why rock the boat?

      • "Well, Harper doesn't need more Canadians to trust him or respect him. He just needs them to vote for him."

        very true…just ask gordon campbell ;-)

    • Your accusations regarding Harper and his government are nothing but outdated and unsubstantiated cliches. You have taken your own prejudices against Conservatives and erroneously pretend this reflects Canadian views — wrong, wrong. Harper has the respect of many Canadians, he is not anti-gay and the secrecy thing at this point is just silly. You need to update your thinking.

  13. This government would be very difficult to beat if seasoned professionals were attempting the task.

    That's a good point. The Liberals can't easily run on their successes from from 93 to 05 because the heavyweights from those governments have moved on. Other than Goodale and Dion, I can't think of any important former cabinet ministers in the liberal caucus. And being in opposition has not been kind to Goodale and Dion.

    Slow news month? Maybe someone should stir up some cabinet shuffle speculation.

    On a more critical point, you've written better columns. I think humour works better for you when it is dry sarcasm buried in serious conversation. This piece is a bit too Feschuk for my taste.

  14. What about other politicians that have gone into hiding? Pauline Marois comes to mind. I think the PQ was left reeling when they lost the last by-election. It seems to have spooked them, and considering how quickly the PQ turns on its leaders, I can't blame Marois for staying out of the limelight.

  15. RE- N D P remnaming. NO point 2 it– unless they would finally call themselves what they are– "union party". they will never see the light–unless they realize U can't just cater 2 one type of peoples– as long as they let the unions run their agenda– they are cooked!!! Would never vote 4 that ideology–anyhow–doesn't work– has been proven all over the world. As 4 Iggy–he'll cook his own goose– as nobody knows what he is talking about– or stands 4–Needs 2 come down 2 earth–speak 2 the people in terms –understanding.

    • I didn't know that Prince was in2 hanging out on the Maclean's comment boards.

  16. What the hell are we supposed to comment on? About six different topics and half of the article devoted to "New".
    Affable and loving hmmmm. How about we call you…. late for dinner! Seriously this article is unbecoming a man your talents. Try it again!

  17. You can't see him because no Canadian should have to work more than 360 hours, anywhere in this country to qualify for PM.

  18. i don!t know who i will vote for in the next election. both liberals &conservatives have pissed away billions- graft at the worst level. the ndp party have not been elected at the federal level and i am sure they are just a capable of pissing away our money. so what is left to vote for ???????????????

  19. Thn New Democratic party was once the Communist Party of Canada was it not? why don't they just go back to a name more fitting of their beliefs?

  20. The reality is that if Iggy exhibited strength and leadership, instead of faux bluster, equivocation and headline following at a time when Canadians still thought Canada was on the wrong economic track, his party may have had a chance at the helm.

    A small one yes, but a chance nonetheless. Now they have no real prospect of winning with the economy on the mend and at a faster pace than our friends to the South.

    Perhaps the Liberals got the leader they paid for. (In democratic terms they paid nothing as he was appointed by a small cabal who apparantly thought they knew better than the ignorant masses at the party base).

  21. The NDP need a name which better reflects who they are. They attempt to skew history by attempting to redefine Canadian history, especially Lester B. Pearson. They have little conscience regarding stealing an election from the Canadian public which required a pact with the Bloc who in effect have achieved sovereignty association. When it comes to voting on key issues, there's nothing democratic about them. All caucus members were told by jack to vote in favor of gay marriage. They have an alliance with the Canadian Islamic Congress and ran islamists during the last election. is this the reason why they are so animately opposed to our presence in Afghanistan?

    I'm sorry for wishing this but when the next election arrives, I'd like to see this pathetic excuses for a Canadian party crushed beyond recognition.

  22. This is one way he can avoid saying something stupid, or looking weak. Shut up and hide!!

  23. Oh my god!!! Now it all makes sense why MacLeans and all its staff keep on writing babble about the Liberals and in their eyes, Harper and his gang can't do anything wrong. Macleans is sucking on Harper's teat and has their head shove up his arse to the tine of almost $3 million!!!! BAWHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!

  24. And I use to respect Paul Wells as a journalist. What a rube I am to think that Wells had any integrity.

  25. I am so glad that I did not renew my Macleans!!!

  26. so much venom for such a light-hearted column. lighten up people. time to get some sun on your jaundiced dermis's methinks. well done, o' rumpled and lovable one.

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