2

Best employers: It’s not about perks

Only three per cent of those working for Canada’s 50 Best Employers rank work-life balance or benefits among what matters most


 

Lisa Ballum knows it sounds cheesy, but there’s a simple reason she’s worked at Delta Hotels for 13 years: “Your voice is heard,” she says. “It really does matter.”

Ballum, who wanted to be a teacher, never envisioned a career at a hotel chain. But after working part-time at a Delta front desk as a York University student, she never looked back, and now works in marketing at the company’s corporate headquarters. At Delta, “you can choose your own destiny,” says Ballum. “That’s what’s kept me around.”

Notice that Ballum doesn’t gloat about retirement benefits, or having the flexibility to work from home. Perks, it turns out, matter little. Only three per cent of those working for Canada’s 50 Best Employers rank work-life balance or benefits among what matters most; 90 per cent, however, chose “recognition” and “career opportunities.”

“There’s a lot of people who say people are going to be more engaged if we pay them more,” says Aon Hewitt’s Neil Crawford. “But the data show that it’s actually fixing the other stuff that’s far more important.”


 
Filed under:

Best employers: It’s not about perks

  1. Do we know if any of the top 50 employers have crap pay and benefits? Because it’s a little difficult to make this assertion otherwise.

    For instance, would Ms. Ballum still not be concerned about the pay if she was making some 10% less than her peers in the same profession? Even if her “voice was heard” on all other issues?

  2. Only three per cent of those working for Canada’s 50 Best Employers rank work-life balance or benefits among what matters most; 90 per cent, however, chose “recognition” and “career opportunities.”

    I don’t know who writes this stuff, but this is what has been said since the Beatles wore tight pants. Who is kidding who?

Sign in to comment.