Drama for 3-D TVs

Flat panel 3-D television sets first came out early last year. But few people own one, or know anyone who does.

by Chris Sorensen

Bright idea Drama for 3-D TVs

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Flat panel 3-D television sets first came out early last year. But few people own one, or know anyone who does. The slower-than-expected sales are believed to be the result of a dearth of available 3-D content to watch, which is why television makers like Sony and Panasonic are joining forces with broadcasters to fix the situation.

Sony recently teamed up with two TV stations in Japan to offer the country’s first 3-D television series, a drama called Tokyo Control, according to the Wall Street Journal. The show is about the workers at the Tokyo Air Traffic Control Center and was made with input from production staff who worked on James Cameron’s 3-D Hollywood blockbuster Avatar. Panasonic, meanwhile, has produced a 3-D music program for satellite TV. Sony predicts that 3-D models will account for 10 per cent of the market by early next year, and that it will have sold 25 million of the sets by March 2011.




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Drama for 3-D TVs

  1. There are several problems with these units. The most prominent is the requirement for glasses, which means you're not having your friends over to watch something in 3d unless you're willing to fork over $400 a person for extra sets of glasses. They're also highly annoying to wear.

    Eyestrain is also an issue, I refuse to go to 3d movies anymore because I simply can't watch the whole thing without eye fatigue. This is due to the optical tricks being used to fake a 3d image out of several 2d images (which is really what it is).

  2. There are several problems with these units. The most prominent is the requirement for glasses, which means you're not having your friends over to watch something in 3d unless you're willing to fork over $400 a person for extra sets of glasses. They're also highly annoying to wear.

    Eyestrain is also an issue, I refuse to go to 3d movies anymore because I simply can't watch the whole thing without eye fatigue. This is due to the optical tricks being used to fake a 3d image out of several 2d images (which is really what it is).

    • Agreed, these units are quite expensive and are thus "somewhat" anti community in that that the high costs make it a private activity (not the best way to generate buzz)

      As to the second point, also bang on. I can only imagine what extened exposure to this type of TV viewing would do to your eyesight, especially childrens. Then again, I'm sure they said the same thing about original TV's and I'm no expert.

  3. Agreed, these units are quite expensive and are thus "somewhat" anti community in that that the high costs make it a private activity (not the best way to generate buzz)

    As to the second point, also bang on. I can only imagine what extened exposure to this type of TV viewing would do to your eyesight, especially childrens. Then again, I'm sure they said the same thing about original TV's and I'm no expert.

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