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The car industry crash, by the numbers

A close look at what used to be known as the Big Three


 

The car industry crash, by the numbers

As a rule, recent years have not been kind to automakers. But amidst the general chaos, the North American car manufacturers—formerly the “Big Three,” now more accurately known as the “Detroit Three”—have sunk well below the rest. As the CEOs of Ford, General Motors and Chrysler plead for mercy from Washington, Macleans.ca presents a statistical snapshot of their nightmare.

Highest stock price of the five largest publicly traded automakers as of the Nov. 20 close on the New York Stock Exchange: $59.79 (Toyota)

Toyota’s stock price on Nov. 20, 2007: $110.07

Best performance of those five stocks over the past year: -43.9% (Honda)

Poorest performance: -89% (GM)

GM’s projected average labour costs for 2008: $69 per hour

Percentage change from 2006: -5.8%

Toyota’s projected average labour costs for 2008: $48 per hour

Toyota’s labour cost advantage: 43.8%

Average hours of labour needed to produce a Toyota automobile in 2007: 30

Average hours needed to produce a Chrysler automobile: 30

Estimated pre-tax, per-automobile profit earned by Toyota: $922

Estimated profit earned by Chrysler: -$412

Total amount the Ontario and Canadian governments, combined, boast of investing in GM’s two Canadian assembly plants: $435 million

Number of compact, subcompact or hybrid models manufactured at those plants: 0

Average rating, out of 100, Consumer Reports awards the Chrysler, GM and Ford products manufactured in Canada: 58

Average rating for the Toyota and Honda products manufactured in Canada: 77

Rating awarded to the Ontario-built Mercury Grand Marquis, the poorest-scoring large sedan: 43

Number of “highs,” or positive points, Consumer Reports ascribes to the Grand Marquis: 1 (its “large trunk”)

City fuel consumption of the 2009 Cadillac Escalade, according to GM specifications: 17.7 litres per 100 km

Average fuel consumption of the 2009 Cadillac Escalade Hybrid, as tested by Wheels.ca: 16.2 litres per 100 km

Change in number of cars and light trucks sold in the U.S. thus far in 2008, compared to 2007: -14.6%

Change in sales of Ford, GM and Chrysler products, combined: -21.2%

Change in number of cars and light trucks sold in Canada thus far in 2008, compared to 2007: +1.4%

Change in sales of Ford, GM and Chrysler products, combined: -6.3%

Greatest increase in Canadian sales over that period: +57.1% (smart), +34.7% (MINI)

Greatest decrease: -28.6% (Saab), -28.1% (Volvo)

Years since GM bought Saab and Ford bought Volvo, respectively: 18, 9


 

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