Canada’s Top 100 Employers

They offer parental leave top-ups, tuition subsidies, flex hours, even private rooms for napping.

by Richard Yerema

The Top 100For the ninth year running, Maclean’s has partnered with Toronto publisher Mediacorp to bring you the country’s most comprehensive independent study of workplace benefits. This year, more than 2,600 organizations applied—up 3.7 per cent from last year, and the most applications in the history of the Mediacorp survey.

For each organization, the editors assigned grades in eight key areas: physical workplace; work atmosphere; health, financial and family benefits; vacation and time off; employee communications; performance management; training and skills development; and community involvement.

The result is a revealing glimpse into the latest workplace trends—and into how Canada’s best employers are making a difference for their employees. Take a look at this year’s list of Canada’s Top 100 Employers.

The employers, listed below, are not ranked and are classified by industry. They are presented in alphabetical order. Click on each name to see a description.

(X) Indicates number of Canadian full-time employees

CONSUMER SERVICES

Carswell
Compass Group Canada Ltd.
Deeley Harley-Davidson Canada
Fairmont Hotels Inc.
Gay Lea Foods Co-operative Ltd.
Loblaw Cos. Ltd.
L’Oréal Canada Inc.
Mars Canada Inc.
Mountain Equipment Co-op
Omni health care LP
Procter & Gamble Inc.

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Agriculture Financial Services Corp.
ATB Financial
Assumption Mutual Life Insurance Co.
Bank of Montreal
Business Development Bank of Canada
Capital One Services Inc.
Johnson Inc.
Meridian Credit union
Royal Bank of Canada
Saskatchewan Government Insurance
Toronto-Dominion Bank

INDUSTRIAL AND RESOURCES

Agrium Inc.
Alberta-Pacific Forest Industries Inc.
BD Canada Inc.
Cameco Corp.
Diavik Diamond Mines Inc.
Ellisdon Corp.
Enbridge Inc.
Goldcorp Inc.
Great Little Box Co. Ltd.
New Flyer Industries Canada ULC
PCL Constructors Inc.
Shell Canada Ltd.
Toyota Motor Manufacturing Canada Inc.
Trican Well Service Ltd.

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES & COMMUNICATIONS

Amec Americas Ltd.
Ceridian Canada Ltd.
CH2M Hill Canada Ltd.
Ernst & Young LLP
Gamma-Dynacare Medical Laboratories Inc.
Golder Associates Ltd.
Halifax Herald LTD.
Hill & Knowlton Canada
KPMG LLP
Price­waterhouse­Coopers LLP
Sasktel
Stikeman Elliott LLP
Telus Corp.
Yellow Pages Group

PUBLIC SECTOR AND NON-PROFIT

Office of the Auditor General of Canada
B.C. Hydro
B.C. Lottery Corp.
B.C. Public service
B.C. Safety Authority
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp.
Canada Post Corp.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research
Canadian Security Intelligence Service
Capital District Health Authority
Catholic Children’s Aid Society of Toronto
Chatham-Kent Health Alliance
College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario
Export Development Canada
George Brown College
Hamilton Health Sciences Corp.
Information Services Corp. of Saskatchewan
McGill University
N.B. Power
Ontario Power Generation Inc.
Ontario Public service
Queen’s University
Royal B.C. Museum Corp.
Royal Canadian Mint
SaskEnergy Inc.
Simon Fraser University
Statistics Canada
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
Toronto Community Housing Corp.
Toronto Hydro Corp.
Vancouver Island Health Authority
City of Vancouver

TECHNOLOGY

Bioware ULC
DeltaWare Systems Inc.
Digital Extremes
Ericsson Canada Inc.
Hewlett-Packard (Canada) Co.
Honeywell Ltd.
MDS Nordion Inc.
MTS Allstream Inc.
Next Level Games Inc.
Research In Motion Ltd.
SAS Institute Canada Inc.
Siemens Canada Inc.
Sophos Inc.
Upside Software Inc.

OTHER

Assoc. of Management, Administrative and Professional Crown Employees of Ontario
Bayer Inc.
Monsanto Canada Inc.
Novartis Pharmaceuticals Canada Inc.

Compiled by Patricia Treble and Michael Barclay

CONSUMER SERVICES

Carswell
Publisher, Toronto.

Leadership program had over 80 per cent of participants promoted upon completion; compassionate leave top-up payments to 95 per cent of salary for eight weeks; $5,000 in adop­tion assistance per child. (645)

Back to the full list

Compass Group Canada Ltd.
Food services company, Mississ­auga, Ont.

Employees start at three weeks vacation; focused training program to help women advance into management-level positions; compassionate care top-up benefits to 80 per cent of salary for six weeks. (11,775)

Back to the full list

Deeley Harley-Davidson Canada
Motorcycle distributor, Richmond, B.C.

Discounts on bikes; demo models can be borrowed; paid time off for volunteer work; mat leave top-ups to 75 per cent for 52 weeks. (171)

Back to the full list

Fairmont Hotels Inc.
Luxury hotels & resorts, Toronto.

Job opportunities around the world including the Caribbean; discounted rates at the company’s hotels and resorts for employees and their families and friends; defined contribution pension plan. (8,643)

Back to the full list

Gay Lea Foods Co-operative Ltd.
Dairy products producer, Mississauga, Ont.

Profit-sharing and share-purchase plans available to all workers; full health benefits for retirees; tuition subsidies; flexible work options. (469)

Back to the full list

Loblaw Cos. Ltd.
Grocery store chain, Brampton, Ont.

Online and in-house training programs and tuition subsidies up to $1,200; mat leave top-ups to 75 per cent of salary for 17 weeks. (31,670)

Back to the full list

L’Oréal Canada Inc.
Cosmetics company, Montreal.

Excellent on-site daycare; downtown workplace has coffee bar and discount cosmetics boutique; international training courses in Paris and New York City. (1,200)

Back to the full list

Mars Canada inc.
Food producer, Bolton, Ont.

Free on-site fitness centre offers one-on-one training; vacation purchase program; generous referral bonuses. (472)

Back to the full list

Mountain Equipment Co-op
Recreation gear retailer, Vancouver.

Healthy lifestyle encouraged with on-site yoga classes, private nap room and shower facilities for cyclists; loan program for computers, boats and bikes. (582)

Back to the full list

Omni health care LP
Long-term residential care provider, Peterborough, Ont. Compassionate leave top-ups to 75 per cent of salary for 17 weeks; seven days off in addition to vacation. (1,137)

Back to the full list

Procter & Gamble Inc.
Consumer products, Toronto.

Academic scholarships up to $2,000 for children of employees and retirees; workers can increase vacation days by transferring unused credits from health benefits plan; three-month paid leave every seven years. (1,912)

Back to the full list

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Agriculture Financial Services Corp.
Provincial Crown corporation for agriculture, Lacombe, Alta.

Referral bonuses of up to $2,500; flexible work arrangements including shortened weeks; subsidized tuition. (501)

Back to the full list

ATB Financial
Financial services, Edmonton.

Full tuition subsidies with no maximum; profit-sharing open to everyone; defined contribution pension plan; extra week of vacation when taken during non-peak months. (4,044)

Back to the full list

Assumption Mutual Life Insurance Co.
Financial services, Moncton, N.B.

Mat leave top-up benefits to 100 per cent of salary for 17 weeks; no-maximum tuition subsidies. (223)

Back to the full list

Bank of Montreal
Financial services, Toronto.

Institute for Learning offers more than 350 courses and programs; formal mentoring program; flexible health benefits include full coverage for retirees. (25,541)

Back to the full list

Business Development Bank of Canada
Crown corporation for business, Montreal.

Up to five days off can be bought through the health benefits plan; retiree health coverage. (1,685)

Back to the full list

Capital One Services Inc.
Credit card issuer, Toronto.

Referral bonuses up to $10,000; subsidized public transit passes; all tuition fees covered. (176)

Back to the full list

Johnson Inc.
Insurance and benefits provider, St. John’s.

Flexible work options include 35-hour week with full pay; bonuses up to $2,000 for professional designations. (1,066)

Back to the full list

Meridian Credit union
Financial services, St. Catharines, Ont.

Tuition subsidies up to $3,000 at outside institutions; paid time off for volunteer work. (745)

Back to the full list

Royal Bank of Canada
Financial services, Toronto.

Nearly one-third of workers take advantage of flexible work options; defined benefit pension plan plus matching RSP contributions. (52,500)

Back to the full list

Saskatchewan government insurance
Insurance provider, Regina.

Defined contribution pension plan with phased-in retirement work options; interest-free loan up to $3,000 for home computer purchase. (1,699)

Back to the full list

Toronto-Dominion Bank
Financial services, Toronto.

Low-interest home loans; share-purchase plan; year-end bonuses; training programs for internationally educated employees. (37,088)

Back to the full list

INDUSTRIAL AND RESOURCES

Agrium Inc.
Fertilizer producer, Calgary.

Located next to a provincial park for convenient nature breaks; four weeks vacation after two years on the job; fully paid health coverage for retired employees. (1,898)

Back to the full list

Alberta-Pacific forest industries Inc.
Pulp facility, Boyle, Alta.

Flexible time-off program lets employees take 12 personal days annually; fourth week of vacation can be taken as time or cash; property has a 16-hectare trout pond, driving range and walking trail. (439)

Back to the full list

BD Canada Inc.
Medical equipment manufacturer, Mississauga, Ont.

Karate and body sculpt classes at subsidized fitness facility; health plan benefits for retirees without age limits; tuition subsidies up to $2,500. (481)

Back to the full list

Cameco Corp.
Uranium producer, Saskatoon.

Matching RSP contributions; phased-in retirement work option; extensive career-development programs. (2,761)

Back to the full list

Diavik Diamond Mines Inc.
Mine operator, Yellowknife.

Five personal paid days off plus three weeks vacation; mat leave top-ups to 90 per cent of salary for 18 weeks; diamond purchase program. (863)

Back to the full list

Ellisdon Corp.
Construction firm, Mississauga, Ont.

Formal mentoring program; profit-sharing and share-purchase plans open to all; defined contribution benefit pension plan. (884)

Back to the full list

Enbridge Inc.
Natural gas distribution, Calgary.

Four separate health benefit plans plus workers given cash equivalent for unused benefits; generous pension plan and matching RSP contributions; three weeks vacation plus 12 more paid days off per year. (3,981)

Back to the full list

Goldcorp Inc.
Mining company, Vancouver.

Year-end bonuses for all; open share-purchase plan; four weeks vacation after three years. (2,350)

Back to the full list

Great Little Box Co. Ltd.
Box manufacturer, Vancouver.

Books are open to employees; no-maximum tuition subsidies; free on-site fitness centre. (172)

Back to the full list

New Flyer Industries Canada ULC
Transit-bus maker, Winnipeg.

Full salaries for apprentices during their training; wellness week includes flu shots and nutrition classes; birthdays off with pay. (1,288)

Back to the full list

PCL Constructors Inc.
General contractor, Edmonton.

Worker-owned firm with a “promote from within” policy—all senior managers are long-time employees; in-house training college, plus tuition subsidies; incentives for safe work performance. (2,066)

Back to the full list

Shell Canada Ltd.
Petroleum company, Calgary.

Discount on gas purchases; health benefits cover retirees; tuition subsidies at outside insti­tutions; helps workers find child care and schools. (5,514)

Back to the full list

Toyota Motor Manufacturing Canada Inc.
Automobile manufacturer, Cambridge, Ont.

Employees and their families get $1,000 off vehicle purchase; defined benefit pension plan; phased-in retirement program. (5,954)

Back to the full list

Trican Well Service Ltd.
Oil and gas well equipment, Calgary.

Parental top-ups to 100 per cent of salary—52 weeks for new moms and 36 weeks for dads; alternative work options. (1,486)

Back to the full list

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES & COMMUNICATIONS

Amec Americas Ltd.
Engineering consultants, Oakville, Ont.

Two-year engineering-in-training program for workers preparing to write professional engineering exam; flexible work options. (4,801)

Back to the full list

Ceridian Canada Ltd.
Human resources services, Winnipeg.

Profit-sharing plans; workers nominate an employee for paid southern vacation; pet insurance subsidy. (1,262)

Back to the full list

CH2M Hill Canada Ltd.
Environmental consulting engineers, Toronto.

Full-time telecommuting option; sustainability development reward program for employees who undertake environmental projects. (1,079)

Back to the full list

Ernst & Young LLP
Professional services firm, Toronto.

Up to $1,000 for gym memberships or home equipment; emergency daycare and home-care service arrangements; extended long weekends. (4,111)

Back to the full list

Gamma-Dynacare Medical Laboratories Inc.

Diagnostic laboratory services, Brampton, Ont.

Phased-in retirement options; matching RSP plan; employees start at three weeks vacation. (1,422)

Back to the full list

Golder Associates Ltd.
Engineering consultants, Burnaby, B.C.

Defined contribution pension plan; profit-sharing plan; bonuses for professional accreditation. (2,541)

Back to the full list

Halifax Herald LTD.
Newspaper publisher, Halifax.

Flexible health plan including retiree benefits; generous tuition subsidies; paid birthdays off. (325)

Back to the full list

Hill & Knowlton Canada
Public relations firm, Toronto.

Two $7,500 grants for continuing education; option to buy vacation days; weekly office beer cart. (226)

Back to the full list

KPMG LLP
Audit, tax, corporate finance services, Toronto.

Grants up to $20,000 for adoptions; generous fitness subsidy; seven paid personal days a year. (5,245)

Back to the full list

Price­waterhouse­Coopers LLP
Accounting and professional services, Toronto.

Wide variety of firm-sponsored sports teams; donates $10,000 on behalf of the employee volunteer of the year; annual fitness allowance to $1,200. (6,048)

Back to the full list

Sasktel
Communications firm, Regina.

Provincial Crown corporation has a free on-site gym and is located near running trails on Wascana Lake’s shore; annual banquet and $500 gifts for longest-serving employees. (3,260)

Back to the full list

Stikeman Elliott LLP
Law firm, Toronto/Montreal.

Flexible work options including 35-hour week at full pay; referral bonuses up to $1,000; formal earned days off program. (1,286)

Back to the full list

Telus Corp.
Communications firm, Vancouver.

Emergency daycare services; share-purchase plan; formal telecommuting program. (25,961)

Back to the full list

Yellow Pages Group
Telephone directories, Verdun, Que.

Fully paid health coverage for retirees with no limits; subsidized tuition up to $2,000. (2,402)

Back to the full list

PUBLIC SECTOR AND NON-PROFIT

Office of the Auditor General of Canada
Federal government auditor, Ottawa.

Parental leave top-up of up to 93 per cent of salary—52 weeks for mom and 35 weeks for dad; flexible health benefits. (705)

Back to the full list

B.C. Hydro
Public utility, Vancouver.

Phased-in retirement option; defined benefit pension; in-house apprenticeship programs. (5,437)

Back to the full list

B.C. Lottery Corp.
Gaming authority, Kamloops, B.C.

No-maximum tuition subsidies; defined benefit pension plan; year-end bonuses. (730)

Back to the full list

B.C. Public service
Provincial civil service, Victoria.

Flexible work options include telecommuting and 35-hour week; in-house apprenticeship programs; Winter Olympic volunteers get one week fully paid; forgives up to one-third of B.C. student loans for recent grads. (26,526)

Back to the full list

B.C. Safety Authority
Safety-standards non-profit, New Westminster, B.C.

Child-care costs covered for workers on trips or at firm events; new dads and adoptive parents get top-up benefits to 85 per cent of salary for 35 weeks. (241)

Back to the full list

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp.
Housing agency, Ottawa.

No-maximum tuition subsidy; mat leave top-up to 93 per cent of salary for 52 weeks; defined benefit pension. (2,024)

Back to the full list

Canada Post Corp.
Postal services, Ottawa.

Employee hockey and curling tourneys; manages Santa Claus’s letter-writing division; full retiree health benefits. (61,856)

Back to the full list

Canadian Institutes of Health Research
Federal funding agency, Ottawa.

Leadership development program; excellent parental leave top-ups; flexible health benefits plan.(442)

Back to the full list

Canadian Security Intelligence Service
Spy agency, Ottawa.

Hires older workers and uses previous work experience toward vacation allowance; mat leave top-up of up to 93 per cent of salary for 52 weeks. (2,449)

Back to the full list

Capital District Health Authority
Health care service provider, Halifax.

Nap room and religious observance room for workers; variable scheduling and other flexible work options; healthy cafeteria food. (6,264)

Back to the full list

Catholic Children’s Aid Society of Toronto
Social support services, Toronto.

Unpaid leaves of absence up to a year; extended maternity leave for up to three years; extensive in-house training programs. (607)

Back to the full list

Chatham-Kent Health Alliance
Health care service provider, Muni­cipality of Chatham-Kent, Ont.

Post-graduate tuition coverage for nursing employees; older nurses given a chance to work in less physically demanding jobs. (706)

Back to the full list

College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario
Medical regulatory body, Toronto.

Phased-in retirement options; defined contribution pension plan; women make up more than 65 per cent of management. (249)

Back to the full list

Export Development Canada
Crown corporation, Ottawa.

Maternity leave top-ups to 95 per cent of salary for 26 weeks; employee language in­­­struction in English, French, Spanish, Russian and Arabic. (1,075)

Back to the full list

George Brown College
Educational institution, Toronto.

Free on-site fitness facility; mat leave top-up to 93 per cent of salary for 52 weeks; flexible work options. (1,300)

Back to the full list

Hamilton Health Sciences Corp.
Health care service provider, Hamilton.

Transitional retirement work program for older employees; alternative work options including telecommuting. (5,682)

Back to the full list

Information Services Corp. of Saskatchewan
Land titles Crown corporation, Regina.

Parental and adoptive top-ups to 95 per cent of salary for 17 weeks; full outside tuition subsidies. (274)

Back to the full list

McGill University
University, Montreal.

Subsidized on-site daycare; holiday shutdown; phased-in retirement program. (5,604)

Back to the full list

N.B. Power
Public electric utility, Fredericton.

On-site daycare at headquarters; self-funded leave program allows for extended paid leave of up to two months; flexible health benefits. (2,465)

Back to the full list

Ontario Power Generation Inc.
Public electric utility, Toronto.

On-site daycare and fitness centre; generous health benefits extend to retirement; extensive support for ongoing education. (11,915)

Back to the full list

Ontario Public service
Provincial civil service, Toronto.

Lots of opportunities for career advancement and specialization; mat leave top-ups to 93 per cent for 32 weeks. (67,339)

Back to the full list

Queen’s University
University, Kingston, Ont.

Subsidy of up to $2,000 per child for off-site daycare; self-funded leave program. (3,669)

Back to the full list

Royal B.C. Museum Corp.
Provincial museum, Victoria.

Unlimited tuition subsidy; gradual retirement transition plan; flexible work options. (115)

Back to the full list

Royal Canadian Mint
Coinage maker, Ottawa.

Parental leave top-ups to 93 per cent of salary for a year; defined benefit pension plan; on-site fitness facility. (796)

Back to the full list

SaskEnergy Inc.
Natural gas distributor, Regina.

Provincial Crown corporation’s mat leave top-ups to 95 per cent of salary for 52 weeks; extensive training and development opportunities. (1,031)

Back to the full list

Simon Fraser University
University, Burnaby, B.C.

On-site daycare; summer day-camp programs for employees’ children; free fitness facilities; subsidized tuition. (4,381)

Back to the full list

Statistics Canada
Statistical agency, Ottawa.

On-site daycare; no-maximum tuition subsidies; retirees health coverage; maternity leave top-up to 93 per cent of salary for 52 weeks. (5,844)

Back to the full list

Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
Health care service provider, Toronto.

Training available in Leadership Institute; on-site daycare; public transit subsidies and shuttle bus to subway station. (5,049)

Back to the full list

Toronto Community Housing Corp.
Social housing provider, Toronto.

Parental leave top-ups to 93 per cent of salary—52 weeks for moms and 37 weeks for dads; compassionate leaves to 93 per cent of salary for eight weeks. (1,403)

Back to the full list

Toronto Hydro Corp.
Public electric utility, Toronto.

Employees can win a week off with pay as part of United Way fundraising; deferred salary program for paid leaves. (1,450)

Back to the full list

Vancouver Island Health Authority
Health services, Victoria.

Defined benefit pension plan; sponsors nurses who are pursuing post-graduate training. (17,397)

Back to the full list

City of Vancouver
Municipality, Vancouver.

Discounted passes and unlimited access to pools, rinks and fitness centres run by the city; variety of in-house training options. (6,644)

Back to the full list

TECHNOLOGY

Bioware ULC
Video game developer, Edmonton.

Free healthy breakfasts; free gym with spa services and personal trainers; long-term workers get seven-week paid sabbatical; paid Christmas shutdown. (402)

Back to the full list

DeltaWare Systems Inc.
Software development services, Charlottetown.

Excellence rewarded with company-paid trips and cash bonuses; small-city location means most commutes are 15 minutes or less. (91)

Back to the full list

Digital Extremes
Interactive software developer, London, Ont.

Experience a factor when determining vacation for new workers; financial bonus up to $1,000 for obtaining professional accreditation. (96)

Back to the full list

Ericsson Canada Inc.
Communications equipment manufacturer, Mont-Royal, Que.

Free on-site gym with personal trainer; subsidized daycare on the premises; share-purchase plan open to all. (1,734)

Back to the full list

Hewlett-Packard (Canada) Co.
Computer products, Mississauga, Ont.

Matching RSP plan; flexible health benefits plan with no waiting period; tuition subsidies up to $5,000. (3,871)

Back to the full list

Honeywell Ltd.
Industrial supplies manufacturer, Mississauga, Ont.

Employees start at three weeks vacation plus four days off during holidays; matching RSP contributions and defined contribution pension plan. (4,590)

Back to the full list

MDS Nordion Inc.
Health care company, Ottawa.

Matching RSP contributions; year-end bonuses; employee referral bonuses; work on a 20-hectare campus close to residential areas. (616)

Back to the full list

MTS Allstream Inc.
Telephone company, Winnipeg.

Public transit subsidies and flexible work arrangements; referral bonuses to $3,000; three weeks vacation to start. (6,424)

Back to the full list

Next Level Games Inc.
Video game developer, Vancouver.

Subsidized fitness memberships and free ski passes to nearby Cypress Mountain; profit-sharing; adoptive leave top-ups to 80 per cent of salary for 27 weeks. (95)

Back to the full list

Research In Motion Ltd.
Wireless communications devices, Waterloo, Ont.

Free BlackBerry and usage fees for all employees; on-site massage treatments; profit-sharing plan and bonuses. (8,576)

Back to the full list

SAS Institute Canada Inc.
Business software, Toronto.

“Green” head office with free on-site gym; allowance for home fitness equipment purchases; in-house band plays company functions; four paid volunteer days off annually. (226)

Back to the full list

Siemens Canada Inc.
Electronics firm, Mississauga, Ont.

One-month bonus for completing professional project management designation; referral bonuses up to $2,000. (4,218)

Back to the full list

Sophos Inc.
Spam and virus detection software, Vancouver.

Matching RSP plan; referral bonuses up to $2,500; compassionate leave top-ups to 100 per cent of salary for four weeks. (189)

Back to the full list

Upside Software Inc.
Business software developer, Edmonton.

Performance rewards include cash bonuses and trips; profit-sharing open to all workers; matching RSP contributions. (149)

Back to the full list

OTHER

Assoc. of Management, Administrative and Professional Crown Employees of Ontario
Union bargaining agent, Toronto.

Mat leave top-up payments to 93 per cent of salary for a year; matching RSP contributions; four weeks vacation after one year. (22)

Back to the full list

Bayer Inc.
Health care and science business, Toronto.

Marché-style cafeteria offers take-home meals; lounge has Wii system in games room; discounts on auto leases and computer equipment; free gym. (963)

Back to the full list

Monsanto Canada Inc.
Agricultural biotech firm, Winnipeg.

Parental leave benefits to 90 per cent of salary for 26 weeks; flexible work options; matching RSP contributions; profit sharing; year-end bonuses. (272)

Back to the full list

Novartis Pharmaceuticals Canada Inc.
Pharmaceutical company, Dorval, Que.

Wellness services include nap room, healthy cafeteria menu and free on-site gym; extensive training and mentoring. (792)

Back to the full list




Browse

Canada’s Top 100 Employers

  1. Your list contains 6 Government of Canada departments and agencies, which offer basically the same benefits—mainly centering on the generous maternity leave support and tuition opportunities, which are available across the board to federal public servants. Shouldn't you have listed the Government of Canada as one entity? It is indeed an employer of choice, and should attract the best talent in Canada, in my opinion.

  2. Please you help me to use facebooku. Chen qui.

  3. It's certainly not Sears Canada which is currently trying to force it's oldest employees, the one's at the top of their pay scale, to quit by offering them as little as 9 hours work per week so that they can hire new workers at minimum wage starting at $8. per hour with no benefits which is possible if you work less than 1250 hours per year and they work hard to make sure you don't. Experience means nothing to Sears.

    • Canadians who think WalMart is the best thing since sliced bread are obviously also in favor of exporting jobs to developing countries, lower quality goods manufactured elsewhere, the disappearance of local small business, part-time benefit-less jobs, among other things in the pursuit of saving a few dollars… or pennies. The impact on Sears is all part of the slow creep of the Wal Mart effect.

      Shop box stores…. destroy this country's stadard of living…. and one day, you'll wake up and wonder what the hell happened???

  4. All levels of government offer very generous employee benefits. I think this is a problem. These benefits are paid for by taxpayers (mostly employees) who are not privy to the same benefits. I think governments should have to mandate the same benefits to all canadians that they offer to employees.

  5. All levels of government offer very generous employee benefits. I think this is a problem. These benefits are paid for by taxpayers (mostly employees) who are not privy to the same benefits. I think governments should have to mandate the same benefits to all canadians that they offer to employees. Are we creating an elitist group–those who worked for the government?

    • If the private sector is not providing you with the pay and benefits that you desire, then maybe try for a job with the civil service. In many cases the generous benefits are a compensation for lower pay than you would find in the private sector. I work for the civil service because few companies in the private sector offer pensions. Keep in mind, the civil service…whether municipal, provincial or federal is still the country's largest employer. Wishing lower wages or fewer benefits on other people seems anti-social to me. Especially since we are hardly a group of elitists.

      • I suggested that benefits paid to civil service workers should be paid to all workers. Afterall it's the tax dollars of all workers that are paying the benefits of civil service workers. For instance, in Ontario I think it's highly inappropriate that every time a service is delisted from health care it's added right on to the civil service extended health care benefit plan that the taxpayer is paying for! Go to the CFIB wage watch and you will find that between wages and benefits there is a growing gap between private sector and public sector compensation 25 to 40%. If this gap exists in a private sector company it's none of my business–when the taxpayer is the employer it is everyones business.

      • I suggested that benefits paid to civil service workers should be paid to all workers. Afterall it's the tax dollars of all workers that are paying the benefits of civil service workers. For instance, in Ontario I think it's highly inappropriate that every time a service is delisted from health care it's added right on to the civil service extended health care benefit plan that the taxpayer is paying for! Go to the CFIB wage watch and you will find that between wages and benefits there is a growing gap between private sector and public sector compensation 25 to 40%. If this gap exists in a private sector company it's none of my business–when the taxpayer is the employer it is everyones business.

        • The obvious route is to organize and bargain for what you think is fair.

          • I've got a better idea. One that's gaining tremendous support. I live in Ontario where 2/3rd of the workforce has no organized pension plan. In Canada 20% of the workforce has 80% of the defined benefit pension plans in this country. Guess who the 20% are. Right–government employees. The taxpayer is paying half the contributions to these plans and is responsible for 100% of funding shortfalls. The cost is horrendous. Lets turn the CPP into a plan that provides decent coverage for all Canadian Workers maybe in the neighborhood of $2000/month and let individuals save for their own retirement over and above. I don't want to fund government employee plans any longer or bail out anymore private company pension plans. I have my own retirement to plan for–I can't fund both.

          • Good idea. Betcha I can beat you to the bottom.

          • I haven't suggested a race to the bottom. I' ve suggested a race for the top where everyone gets a decent pension. Do you have a problem with that?

          • For costs, which are irrelevant since pensions are part of the pay package: the actuarial reports that I have show the actuarial cost of federal public service pensions was 16.2% of salary; we military cost 25.02%, MPs pensions cost 35%, cabinet ministers 45% of salary, City of Ottawa 11.5% of salary, private employers – unknown.

          • It's impossible to do a proper actuarial study on defined benefit plans because the payout has nothing to do with the amount of money in the plan. Hence, we the taxpayer are constantly topping up the plans. They are much like a pyramid scheme and require constant growth from the bottom to pay out the top.

          • Nonsense. Consider this scenario. An employer has decided he can pay employees $60,000 a year.

            He can pay them $60,000 in cash, or
            $50,000 in cash and a pension costing $10,000.
            $55,000 in cash with equal contributions of $5,000 from employee and employer.

            What is the difference?
            Regardless of the approach, the employer is paying $10,000 for the pensiion and the employee is paying for it by doing his work.

          • Again I refer to the Macleans study where they took two couples with identical contributions over an identical period of time. The defined benefit pension plan paid out over 5x the amount of money. The reason being the defined benefit plan isn't based on the amount of money in the plan, it's based on an average of top 5 earning years. Turn the defined benefit into a defined contribution plan and you will very quickly see the difference.

            Name one private sector company that has started a defined benefit pension plan in the last 30-40 years. There's a reason. These plans worked when life expectancy was 70 and retirement age was still 65. With freedom 58 and a life expectancy of 80+ they don't.

          • Then do not boast to claim as a benefit! And a pay package option can earn them as a Top100, what a nonsense, AC.

          • Taxpayers including you and I pay for the total pay package of government employees. Pensions are part of that pay package. There is no more reason to complain about pensions then there is to complain about salary.. Complain about the total pay package if you want. Just for the record, the actuarial cost, of our military pension in the 70s and 80s was 25.02% of our salaries. How would you like to have your employer in control of 30 years of 25.02% of your salary?

            Then the way that Defined Benefit pensions are calculated, the purchasing power odf the pension is reduced while the cost is exactly similarly reduced. 1982 retirees pensions are 26% less in purchasing power than if inflation were zero at that time.

            How about joining pensioners in sorting out this despicable, NEVER MENTIONED, characteistic of Defined Benefit Pensions? No doubt there are other faults in the government regulated pension industry. There is we should concentrate our efforts.

    • NO. There is no such thing as a generous benefit. Benefits are part of the pay package. The employer has opted to pay with a pension rather than in cash. Benefits use the employees money. Neither the taxpayer nor the employer pay for benefits.

      • I can live with that explanation. However, it also means that the value government pay packages in this country are 25 to 40% higher than the private sector. I suspect this is because they aren't spending their own money.

        • joannie1. Fine, if you want to correct imbalances in compensation private and public, then please do so. But don't pick on retired people. I trust that you agree that retirees in both the private and public sector should not get pensions ravaged by inflation, to the benefit of the employer. That is what happens with the current method of calculating defined benefit pensions. Can we separate the two issues – discuss compensation for current employees, while supporting paying retirees their pensions?

      • That's a true nonsense, which means that most of on most entry level and intermediate level, the government is overly generous to pay 20% more than those in private sectors. If this is not consider generous, then why the private sectors can not match?

    • Next time the contract comes up, the government should grandfather existing employees and lower the total package value for new hires. Over time they'll be brought in line with the rest of the country.

    • If you think for one moment that the governments offered these benefits that civil servents recieve, think again. They were earned with dedicated employees stepping up to the plate and devoting hours and hours of their time negotiating for all their brothers and sisters in contract negotiations. I work as a civil servant and I know that if it was not for the unions negotiating I would be getting $8.00 an hour and would have no pension or medical and dental benefits. Remember that the governments are no different than other employers. If they could they would pay you nothing for your services. Some already pay only 85% of the wage to new employees for 3 months when they are doing the same job and have the same responsibilities as the senior employee. In my humble opinion the Governments of Canada should fit in Canada's worst employers list

  6. hard to believe Loblaws is on this list. I know dozens who work for this company and none speak highly of it. They work there becase they need the job.

    • completely agree with you Jim. Loblaws is a terrible employers. How did it get on the list.? Oh, I know! They lied on their application. I can tell you first hand it is not a good place to work.

      • Correct me if I'm wrong, but Maclean's does interview some employees to verify what is said on the application and to get the opinions of the employees. That said they may be referring to the corporate office.

    • I AGREE. I WORKED THERE AND IT WAS AWFUL IN THE WAREHOUSE. IT IS A PLACE I WOULD LIKE TO SEND MIKE MOORE INTO, A REAL BAD PLACE TO WORK. ABUSE

    • Another point of view Jim if I may offer it. I've worked for a number of companies throughout my career. Some good and some bad. But the bad ones – I left. I find that a lot of people just stay where they're unhappy. Sure – complaining is part of life, but then enough already. I don't care how much you need the job – look for a new one, move on, and take control of your life. I just don't have any time left for complainers who allow things, companies and life to happen to them. Don't even get me started on lazy union mentalities – they're just pathetic people who will complain till they die.

  7. why is politicians not on this list. they take money from everyone,paid vacations when they want, spend what ever they want on a no limit budget. decide what we pay for everything decide what we are allowed to do.Paid to cheat on there wifes. when they want a raise all they do is take one. the best of all when the retire they get there choice of payments.
    oh yes one more they get that tops the list during there term they pay nothing out of pocket we ensure what they need is paid.

  8. As a Loblaws employee for over 27 years, I have seen many changes and I will admit not unlike many other companies that the Loblaws has had it's challenges in the past with upholding morale. In these changing times and the restructuring that has taken place internally, it is certainly becoming increasingly difficult to appease all of our colleagues. Based on internal survey results, I would tell you that the shift in focus on our current and future colleagues is something this company has really done very well. Have we succeeded in the corporate mission and philosophy yet? Not by a long shot! We still have some work to do however, I believe we are in charge of our own morale to some degree.
    Customer service is not necessarily a natural ability. In this extremely competitive market and economic times, when we can engage our colleagues into the business and remember that we are there for the customer, I believe that will carry the company forward for many years to come.
    To Jim's point above, there are a great many things the company is doing to accomplish this, however, if those colleagues he speaks of are just there because they "need the job" I would ask those people what part of their morale do they own? Do they really understand what the company is trying to accomplish with it's own workforce and do they really care about the customers we serve every day? If they can't answer those questions, then we will continue to have those in the business who are not gaining any satisfaction. I would suggest that not everyone is capable of great customer service. Is this really the job for you?

    • I agree you have to have a certain skill for the customer service industry however possessing that skill has nothing to do with the fact the Loblaws screwed many workers a few years back with their contract negotiations regarding the Zehrs employees who fall under the Loblaws umbrella. I agree there was a time working for Loblaws corp was good, I did it for 10 years and enjoyed it some what. Problem is after 10 years I was still no where close to full time employment and sick of doing all the good work that was never recognized! I have kept contact with many of the people I worked with back then and one of them even had to take a second job in order to keep her head afloat after the terrible contract they were forced to settle on in back in the early 2000's. This is extremely sad that after 18 years of service they would tell her she had to agree to take a huge pay cut OR be let go and the company would reopen under a different name so they wouldn't be required to take any employees back! It was a very sneaky deal and you can't convince me they (the big guys running the show making 6 figures) are hurting like any of these employees did nor have they lost any sales to justify the pay cut!

      • I can't believe Loblaws made it to the top 100… They certainly did not survey myself or my colleagues… I really
        wonder who they did survey.. I've been with the company for 18 years…. I must say the first 10 years, we were treated
        very nicely, initiatives, and so on…
        Now things have changed. Working under the different banner, lost my 12 sick days, and christmas bonus… There are absolutely no incentives… It's a joke, how many lazy and useless Full timers
        I see in my store alone, but nothing ever gets done about it…. There is no direction, no incentives, absolutely nothing to look forward to other than my weekly paycheque. I don't believe the company treats their employees so great at all
        , I haven't seen any respect or appreciatiion, to some of us hard working employees who still care despite, what I see around me.

        Loblaws claimed a few years ago, and tried to scare us that Walmart was taking over, i don't see
        Loblaws hurting, yup the big guys still make 6 figures, so what do they care about us at store level. .

    • Is this author Gaelon himself?

    • If I worked at a Loblaw store, I'd be happy too! They seem to be allowed to provide zero service, with infinite attitude, and keep their jobs! Must be nice to do zip and be paid for it. I'm so jealous!

      • I have experienced this over and over. You walk up and down the aisles looking for a staff member to no avail. When you finally track someone down they are usually unable or unwilling to help and respond with a tactless "aisle 6" to direct you as far from them as possible.

    • I am glad that Loblaws has worked out for you. But not for me. I have always been a very hard worker. Senior workers get better pay, benefits and yes, respect. However, I do not have seniority. Department managers are often rude and callous. Scheduling is based on favoritism cloaked in seniority. My twenty five year old boss transferred a girl with more seniority than me into our department and now they share a house together. Management does not understand what conflict of interest means. I tried for a manager job only to be bumped by a student. Basically, education, a good work ethic and business experience can't beat seniority. Recently, a new employee was hired for our department. . A good kid. He hasn't been scheduled for any hours in three weeks. Management. Yup, there's lots of it. But no leadership! And shrinkage! Hah! You know what issues you have with so called colleagues!

  9. Loblaw Cos. Ltd.? You have to be kidding or must be rating just the corporate head office. In store its a different story. Loblaw Cos. Ltd. is notorius for underpaying their staff and hiring 90% of the staff as part time instead of full time.

    Take for instance their buy out of Loeb in which they wanted to just close all of the stores shortly after buying them. They were not allowed to by government order. So they converted them into Value Mart stores and then several years later systematically closed down over 90% of the Value Mart stores.

    Then consider their practice of busting up unions by closing stores and reopening a new store under a different name (ie: Zhers to Real Canadian Superstore).

    Then with their predatory pricing and large buying power they muscle out locally owned and operated grocery stores (just like Walmart does). The result may be more jobs but at half the pay and again over 90% at part time hours. Basically those jobs are only adequate for students or seniors looking to make a few extra bucks.

    Loblaw Cos. Ltd. is posting record profits and very little of that trickles down to the store level employee.

    • I strongly agree with Dustty, Georgia and more so Dave!
      I was with Loblaw Co. for 25 years in both head office and store level. The smoke and mirrors created in head office that Happy in Kitchener is echoing is the same song and dance I had listened to for years. However, once you work at store level the smoke clears and the mirrors shatter. For years, people were in their positions and were not held accountable. Passing the buck was routine, as a result it created a multi layered personnel to perform the most basic of responsibilities. In 2006 in was announced Mark Foote was coming in to "shake things up", there was no hiding. Massive restructuring and layoffs for redundant positions and outdated policies seemed to rattle those cushioned in a career of no accountability. It was long overdue, and saved the company an absorbent amount of money. Next was to tighten the retail section to be more profitable and in line with the competition.

  10. When are you going to have the worst company to work for. Sears Canada should be # 1.

    • WORST COMPANIES IN CANADA?
      What a great idea! Maybe the idiots will sit up and take notice of what they're doing wrong instead of ignoring employee opinions.

  11. Dave you are more than right in your comment. Our local Zehr's ousted many long term employees with the change to the Real Canadian Superstore. Department managers in particular who had given as much as 25 years loyal service to Zehr's. Those they couldn't give the golden handshake had their working environment made so miserable they left. One long time dept manager was even physically attacked by the store manager who lost his cool. Our local store once a great place to shop is now going down hill. We now have inexperienced people trying to do the job of a once great staff. Existing staff don't have a clue on how to run the departments or customer service.

  12. One Of the worst companies in Canada to work for is Ceva Logistics in Brampton, Ontario. They treat their employees like they are stupid useless. They send people home without pay on a daily basis. They force people to work Saturdays. They call safety meetings during layoffs & demand that people go. Every gain that the workers get comes with less workers doing more work.

  13. Toyota's $1000 off vehicles for employees and their families is crap compared to what Honda offers. Dealer cost plus 7% cash back to the employee. Plus there is a great leasing program available to employees that includes insurance and maintenance, a very competitive pension program, etc, etc, etc…. The word on the street is that Toyota has mandatory overtime with no advance notice as well. All Honda's overtime is voluntary. I could go on about Honda's own Hockey League with its own arena…. oh wait, now I am going on and on and on…

  14. CONT…
    The impact on store level was horrific. Every level of service was effected during the transition, it is reflected in consumer feedback and shareholder confidence. From having 4 to 8 full time employees per department, it had been scaled back to no more than 2 and the remainder part time. Sure it saved the company money, but the result is empty shelves, understaffed stores, and ultimately lack of cleanliness was reported back by the consumer. With the severe scaling back of full time committed staff and replacing it with students and/or under qualified service staff the moral did plummet. I felt it then, and continue to hear it currently from those who are still there awaiting their retirement.

  15. CONT….
    That is if, the store they are currently in doesn't change banners resulting in the breaking of their contract, lessen their wages and the removal of their benefits happens first. All to "stay in line with the competition and be profitable". Yes, I am sure there are those who are "happy" to just have a job, most of those haven't been a Canadian citizen for longer than 2 years and view it as a gateway to something better down the road or it is those who enjoy the extra cash to supplement another job they have elsewhere. Ask the causalities of Loblaw increasing profits, layoffs, and store closures and a more accurate depiction of how great it is to work in such a volatile environment. I suspect the outcome will certainly impact the ranking on this list unfavourably.

  16. The list that outlines that Loblaws is a top employer is quit pitiful. Most companies offer what is listed. Big deal! I would never work for them!

  17. No no the bottom of the bottoms -100 position under THE WORST EMPLOYER here in our own soil … corrupt and beyond

    COMMISSIONAIRES CANADA ( … I am surprised the Gov/nt haven't investigated them yet … ) what a Joke!

    • Try Bell Canada as the worst employer…the only people they hate more than their customers are their employees…I just retired from them this summer and now work on the Commissionaires…they treat their employees better…

  18. for SHAME! i cannot believe Loblaws is on that list. They definitely did not survey me or my colleagues. Funny.. because I specifically remember filling out the last employee survey with a whole slew of negative comments. I admit that Loblaws used to be a good company to work for… but it isn't any longer. Not by a long shot.

  19. P.S. I couldn't agree more with what Pete stated.

  20. I note you suggest that the Ontario public service is one of Canada’ top 100 employers . I doubt this with thousands of outstanding Grievances and a new mean spirited Desion to deny summer students Vacation pay and reduce hours at many historical parks the Ontario public service should have made the the list of the bottom 100 employers. The public servants who work for this overbearing monolith are very much in the top 100 best employees

    Mark Barclay.

  21. I'm shocked that Medtronic of Canada did not make the list. I started at this company a month ago and have been blown away by the benefits, the staff, the mission, and the company's incredible treatment of its employees and customers. The company offers most of the benefits offered by the top 100 (combined!), 98% of the employees know the mission by heart (and work for the company because they believe in it), and the retention rate speaks to the growth opportunities and positive atmosphere the company provides.

    • If they wanted to make the list they'd have to pay the applicaiton fee and submit the form. It also helps if they register a table at the conference. THis process is a moneymaker for Richard Yerema and Tony Meehan of Medicorp – not a true representation of top employers based on merit.

  22. Holy crap. Maybe Loblaws is a bad place to work because all their employees are here spewing venom rather than…working?

    • That should give you an indication of how terrible morale is there. Yet its rated as one of the Top Employers? There is a distinct divide of treatment from head office employee's to store level. Store level employess that you see spewing venom are not treated well at all, hence the comments discrediting the study. In the past 10 years, more is taken away from them than provided. From lessening of wages, removal of benefits, to increased work weeks, with little to no incentives. Basically they have gotten the shaft. However, luckily spared having to do any adjustments in their incomes are home office employees who still get their Management Carribean All- expense paid trip, (with spouses) once a year. .. Christmas parties…Golf days, and have yet to see pay decreases. Those happy campers are too busy working to comment I suppose.

  23. joannie1 said: "It's impossible to do a proper actuarial study on defined benefit plans because the payout has nothing to do with the amount of money in the plan. Hence, we the taxpayer are constantly topping up the plans."

    Nonsense. An actuarial report is made about every five years on ALL Defined Benefit Plans. The purpose is to check assets versus liabilities, and to calculate the percentage of salary which should go in to a plan to pay for pensions for current employees. That is, the employer pays for the pensions for employees while they are employees. When employees retire, their pensions are paid for.

  24. If the return on investment is higher than assumed by the actuary, a surplus develops. Unfortunately some employers use the excess, often to placate unions. Then, if return on investment decreases, a deficit will result. However, reputable employers, and that does not include the federal government, will simply leave the fund alone. Wait for the next actuarial report to see what adjustments are required.

    Why do I pick on the federal government? Their regulators and administrators KNOW that with Defined Benefit plans, the employer gains and the retiree loses the same amount. This is due to to the method of calculating pensions. The public servants don't speak out; the politicians don't correct the situation. 1982 retirees' pensions are 26% less than if inflation were zero. Their pension funds, including the federal government funds, gain 26% from these seniors.

    And the feds have a program to stop abuse of seniors.

    • Wow, this is informative. You need to write a column somewhere.

      • Ivan said : Wow, this is informative. You need to write a column somewhere

        If this is meant for ArtCampbell – love to. 28 years of trying and no publication. Letter occasionally. Then Comments such as this. however, Report on Business has struck back. I made a comment on "Ontario pledges pension reform". There were responses. I went back to respond, clicked on Comments and up came "Comments are closed". Others can access but I can't even see the Comments.

        Makes me chuckle. Frequently the media tells us veterans that we put our lives on the line for freedom of the press!!

  25. John G – i'm sure you think you're quite clever. but i'm going to pretend that you do not know the inner workings of the company… *cough*the employees who work at store level don't work on computers during the day/have no internet access*cough*
    But you go right on ahead and say that we're being vagrants wasting company time during our work hours and typing on the Internets. You know.. I , for one, LOVE pulling out my laptop from my uniform pocket and accessing the world wibe web with the nifty WIFI we had put in at all our locations… i frequently do it right on the customers lap to push the envelope even further. good times.

    *eye roll*

    However.. can't really tell you about those head office people… Perhaps, you are right on that account.

    • What do you mean pretend that I don't know the inner workings? You don't have to pretend, I don't work there. Was just struck by the number of Loblaws employees who read this here and were commenting on it, that's all.

  26. It is very difficult to assess a company in regard to benefits and how employees are treated, without surveying a cross-section of employees. The picture always looks prettier to those on the outside looking in. Do I agree with the Top 100 chosen? Off course not.

    ….Judy

  27. I am curious how much research you actually did before you rated a company. Did you just take the information supplied to you by the company's HR and take it on face value. Case in point is HP. This is a company that cuts its employee pay even when the company is making a profit. This also a company that continues to lay off people so that they can move the jobs off shore. I believe in some sections of the company they want a 70/30 mix. That is 70% off shore and 30% on shore.This is a company that continues to cut employee benefits while it allows its executives to use its private fleet of planes for personal use. I believe Mark Hurd racked up approx $136,000 in personal use of the planes and another $7,472 in travel expenses for Hurd's family. In fact the taxes the Mark Hurd owes for the private use of the planes is also coverd by HP. Mark has his mortgage, and home security covered by the company while benefits, pay and other employee compensations are cut. I used to work for another company that never made your list but I could go for a dental check up every 3 mths and it was 100% covered. HP is 6 mths and 90%. Sure there is no waiting period but what are the benefits that are offered? In fact I have to buy my own pens since we are no longer allowed to order office supplies.

    • I agree. HPs CEO Mark Hurds management style is one of fear and lies. Please remove HP from the list.

      • Agreed, this company does one thing after another to ensure the morale is in the toilet

    • John: As an HR Professional who completes these applications for companies, I can tell you with 100% certainty that they DO NOT survey employees or fact-check. They base the results on applications submitted by the company (corporate HR typically) and then create a list based on their unreleased criteria (ask them for reasons why other than the PR stuff and they clam up quickly). This list is a joke!

  28. Bell Canada should also be placed on the worst place to work list. After 31 years of service, I was basically forced to retire…If .I stayed past 2011, I would lose my benefits. Over the past three years, they have been royaly screwing over their employees who now hate the company with a passion. They continue to outsource and micro manage jobs from their head offices in Toronto and they know nothing about the jobs they try to micro manage. They gave ovation awards to managers who out source call centres from Canada to India, causing many Canadians to lose their jobs and alienating many others by their poor service. I was so proud to be an employee when I started in 1978….I never thought I would leave the company on such a low note.

  29. This site should include the worst employers. The worst company in Ontario has to be Americredit Corp. You don't have to go to Asia to work in a sweat shop. This call center is a nightmare. They do everything possible to intimidate their employees, they harass them continually all day long. Employees are intimidated into not using the washrooms except on break or lunch, they are given demeaning performance appraisals every month and spoken to in the most condescending manner. You are not allowed to speak with other reps except at breaks and lunch. Most employees are resentful and hate working for this corporation but need jobs so continue to stay. This type of company should be sent back to America where they allow this atrocious corporate behavior. Employees here are constantly sick with nerves and depression. What happened to companies treating their employees with respect and dignity…. Obviously Americredit and a lot of other corporations don't have a clue how to treat their employees these days.

  30. Are you kidding me… Canada Post as a top employer !! I work for Canada Post and I ask you, how did it get in the topp 100 ? Never before have I worked in a place where you are treated so badly. The mgmt is in such a mess and out of contact with reality that when my wife ( who works for a top 3 company ) heres about what happens it makes her sick to her stomach. But I forgot it is only mgmt who sends in their reasons to be in the top 100, you never ask the employees. And as for our hockey it was disolved years ago and benefits after retirement cost you so much most of the retires cant afford them.

    • I too work for Canada Post and couldn't agree with you more.

    • I do believe you have an annual employee survey where you can spew your venom. As a former employee and happy retiree, I know for a fact that CPC does listen to and resolves many 'ee concerns. However, just like the Titanic, it takes time for a ship this size to turn on a dinghy-sized rudder. I must agree that line management in the delivery environs in many instances are out of control and being so far removed from area managers, they seem to run counter to the corporate plan. More scrutiny in this area would be a prudent move for mgmt at senior levels.

  31. I am in shock that Omni Heathcare made this list I would like to know who is receiving a nap room ,and in house child care, and top ups to UI and redused summer hours this must be management it sure isn't the employees I personaly think this is BS

  32. Interesting and useful article

  33. I worked for Royal Bank and I was impressed with their corporate culture. However working in the branch I saw employees come in to work on their day off for an hour or two, or in the morning before the branch opened. It seemed to me that in order to do the job the way they wanted it done you needed to put in 4-5 hours extra time/ per week. I am speaking generally now. I have a problem with the pervasive corporate culture of free overtime being mandatory. This is because if you don't do it, someone else will. Everyone is in a Catch22. If you do it, it's not right and you're giving away your life energy to rich exploitative companies and benefiting THIER shareholders, if you don't, your colleague that does work for free will be the one to get promoted. Parents need a nanny or unpaid worker (mother or mother in law) to help raise their kids when employees are expected to work beyond regular business hours regularily.

  34. Magna International should have made to #1 in the list (if favoratism was in fact included as a positive count). Let's face it people, you have to be connected period.
    p.s. connection needs to be to the top but rather from your bottom.

  35. Research In Motion should be rated number 1. They're amazing to work for.

  36. Flex Hours is code for 50+ hr work weeks, little recognition and little pay

  37. I know one that made the list and does not deserve to be there. Like others, I am wondering whether MacLean's takes the word of the marketing department/head of company or whether it actually does on-site examinations/employee surveys. If a company makes this list, then it has an advantage against a union in any later negotiating.

  38. CIty of Vancouver?!!:?

    Hiring freeze, demoralized work force, a huge axe about to swing through it, Olympic Chaos impending…

    god, everyone else's jobs must really suck…

  39. What a joke that Loblaws is in the top 100..I have worked for Zehrs for over 21 years and it was a great work place !! Now that Loblaws have taken over we have gone hill really fast..Doesn't help that the UFCW union is in bed with the company!! This last contract I lost $5.00 an hour because I work on the non food side of the store. I make 13.85 an hour while the fresh side of the store makes 17.00 and over. We lost all sick days, Christmas bonus, Sunday premuim but we have to Sundays along with 2 nights a week. The poor part time kids start off getting great hours until after they are done training and the if they are lucky they might get 6 hours a week..Then the company wonders why we have such a high turn over in staff. I would NOT recommend this company to anyone looking for a job..The morale in the store are so low I don't think they can get any lower, therefore nobody cares about customer service. Also they are pushing PC products or No Name products and not giving the customer choices in what they buy.. Take a look on the shelves and the National Brands are only 2 facings and everything else is pc on no name..TOP WORST COMPANY TO WORK FOR IS LOBLAWS!!

  40. I can't believe Canada Post made the list again. They are nothing but a slave labour company. Someone who sits behind a desk decides how long it should take to complete a mail route, regardless of volume. You are required to work until finished but only paid for the hours said number cruncher figures it should take you. I work at least 2 hours every day for free and there is absolutely nothing I can do about it. I need my job.

    • I have to agree with Gert who is likely employed in the RSMC realm which is a delivery employee w/o the benefits of a regular letter carrier. How can she do the same work as a letter carrier, but based on an arbitrary formula, be paid less?? However, as an employee who delivers via there personal vehicle, I'm not sure that volume should be as much of a criteria than that of an employee who delivers w/o a vehicle. I'm sure this factors into the process.

      • I'm sorry guys but let's be honest here. Canada Post is the only place where you can work an eight hour shift and get paid for 1.75 hours of OT within that eight hour shift. Not to mention that so many employees have second jobs due to the fact that they can finish their 8 hours in 5.5 to 6 hours. And they are not even tired after working SO hard. Hopefully that is all about to change….

  41. Canadian Blood Services is the worst company to work for. The government should check into their practices. Stressful job and very disorganized company. They do not care about the lives of their employees. Unreal considering the CEO gets paid more than the President of the US.

    If they treated their employees better they might be able to retain them!

    • That is for sure – the employees are unfriendly rude and act like bitter a**holes-

  42. What about Onatrio Teacher's Pension Plan board. heard good things but still not sure. Any light?

  43. Maybe Macleans should actually talk to the employees of the companies they are rating! I'm not talking about upper level management or supervisors…. I'm talking about the ones at the bottom of the totem pole. If you want to find out the truth about a companies culture you need to hear how they treat people at the bottom…. not the ass kissers or head steppers at the top. I know for a fact there are a couple companies on your list that are full of disgruntled employees….

    • I couldn't agree more!!!!!!!!!!

  44. Sounds like a disgruntled CUPW employee to me…

    • Sounds like he might have actually worked there and you haven't. If you did work there and still believe it's a great atomosphere, then you're likely part of the problem.

      It is not a good place to work. The treatment of workers is appalling.

  45. Canada Safeway is not the same either, they are always trying to get rid of the old staff that been there for years, then they have a hard time trying to hire staff then they quit, we spend time trying to serve our customers then trying to train while working which we should not do. I think head office should do this not us and not getting paid extra for this. The new employees have no respect for the old-timers that have been there for years. But, in my eyes I think that people have to work for a living but it's the employees that make it hard for you so I do not blame people that do not want to work. I also do not agree on these new immigrants coming to Canada and taking all our jobs for cheaper pay stay in your own country. sometimes I do not blame them because you have to make some kind of living but Vancouver is not the same as before back in the 70s and 80s. People now are money hungry and backstabbers (you know who you are). It makes me sick to think it about it. But, being a CDN born and raised here I hate that the CDN people are like sheep, they do not speak out at all. The white man do not work hard and they complain too much, change that. Why does the government let these people in??? Get rid of this government…. we need riots!!! Speak up CANADA!! No wonder I do not care if the world ends, I hope we all go… the whole world all at once!!!! F… U!!!!!!!!!

  46. Someone has made a terrible mistake and should have consulted the employees since Gamma Dyncare Medical Labs is on this list! The staff turnover is tremendous and the morale in most departments is abominable.

  47. Walmart is the WORST and always has been as an employer.
    It will probably never change from that.

  48. I used to work for one of these nameless companies and I quit because I thought it was a terrible place to work. Well the joke is on me cause I got a new job and it is far worse than the one i had.

  49. I've worked at Belden in Ville st-laurent QC.
    They fire people for NO REASON!!!!!!
    AND THEY ARE VERY SNEAKY ABOUT IT!
    Be carefull, you could thing you're doing a great job, but have no job the day after!!!

    And you will never know why!……

  50. i'm interested reading everything various people have to say about Loblaws….as both my parents have worked for that company their entire lives and both have nothing good to say about that company. both work in store, are both in management positions and both have been fighting for 20 years to keep their jobs as they make too much money. my mother has not taken more than 4-5 sick days in 30 years, has a very strong work ethic, is kind, and service oriented. she brings decrepid stores back from the grave with top national sales…and still, they want to get rid of her and hire only part time people, at 1/3 of the wage to replace her. and with that they can't find anyone williing to take on the demands of the work, practice showing up for shifts, or providing good customer service because they know (i'm sure) that they are being screwed over for no pay, and expected to want to work hard for their employers….
    Loblaws should be ashamed of themselves and be showing up the a different list of employers ratings.

  51. many companys use the buzz words like "respect" or "personal growth" or "empowerment" but its all crap. Leaders are looking to pad the bottom line for share holders and top managers at workers expense. These surveys are mostly crap and dont mean much unless you talk to the people at the bottom.

  52. There is a project, named Canada's Top 100 Employers project, a national competition to determine which employers lead their industries in offering exceptional workplaces for their employees. Employers are evaluated by the editors of Canada's Top 100 Employers using eight criteria, which have remained consistent since the project's inception: (1) Physical Workplace; (2) Work Atmosphere & Social; (3) Health, Financial & Family Benefits; (4) Vacation & Time Off; (5) Employee Communications; (6) Performance Management; (7) Training & Skills Development; and (8) Community Involvement. Employers are compared to other organizations in their field to determine which offers the most progressive and forward-thinking programs.

  53. Thank God Bombardier is NOT on that list! I've worked in many places and Bombardier Supply Chain is by far the worst in terms of politics within the work place. You could easily be promoted to manager without education, simply by getting drunk with the management. it's very sad.

  54. How does one get on this list? Do they buy their way on the list? I work for a company on this list and unlike what is stated they do not pay their employees any sick day and are anything but a top employer. Hogwash at it’s fines.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *