2010 University Student Surveys: web-exclusive charts

Students tell what they really think about their university, from the quality of their profs to whether they feel they get the runaround.

Here you will find additional results from the Canadian University Survey Consortium (CUSC).? The CUSC survey, which was commissioned by the universities, asks more than 100 questions about specific aspects of the undergraduate experience—inside the classroom and beyond—designed to provide universities with data to help them assess programs and services.

Each year, the survey targets one of three student populations: first-year students, graduating students and all undergrads. In 2009, 34 campuses took part, administering an online questionnaire to a random sample of approximately 1,000 graduating students at each university. Institutions with fewer than 1,000 graduating students surveyed them all. In total, more than 12,000 students took part for an overall response rate of 45 per cent.

Each chart lists the universities in descending order of achievement. Responses are ordered according to the percentage of survey participants who chose the highest level of satisfaction (e.g., “very satisfied”).

Complete 2010 University Student Survey results available here.

For past year’s results, see here

The CUSC survey is an annual survey with a focus on student satisfaction. In 2009, 34 campuses took part, administering an online questionnaire to a random sample of approximately 1,000 graduating students at each school. More than 12,000 students responded to questions about everything from academics to support services.

MOST OF MY PROFESSORS ENCOURAGED STUDENTS TO PARTICIPATE

IN CLASS DISCUSSIONS



The CUSC survey is an annual survey with a focus on student satisfaction. In 2009, 34 campuses took part, administering an online questionnaire to a random sample of approximately 1,000 graduating students at each school. More than 12,000 students responded to questions about everything from academics to support services.

MOST OF MY PROFESSORS WERE REASONABLY ACCESSIBLE

OUTSIDE OF CLASS TO HELP STUDENTS


The CUSC survey is an annual survey with a focus on student satisfaction. In 2009, 34 campuses took part, administering an online questionnaire to a random sample of approximately 1,000 graduating students at each school. More than 12,000 students responded to questions about everything from academics to support services.

MY ACADEMIC LEARNING EXPERIENCES AT THIS UNIVERSITY HAVE BEEN INTELLECTUALLY STIMULATING


The CUSC survey is an annual survey with a focus on student satisfaction. In 2009, 34 campuses took part, administering an online questionnaire to a random sample of approximately 1,000 graduating students at each school. More than 12,000 students responded to questions about everything from academics to support services.

I SOMETIMES FEEL I GET THE RUNAROUND

AT THIS UNIVERSITY


The CUSC survey is an annual survey with a focus on student satisfaction. In 2009, 34 campuses took part, administering an online questionnaire to a random sample of approximately 1,000 graduating students at each school. More than 12,000 students responded to questions about everything from academics to support services.

SATISFACTION WITH THE OVERALL QUALITY OF THE EDUCATION

YOU HAVE RECEIVED AT THIS UNIVERSITY


The CUSC survey is an annual survey with a focus on student satisfaction. In 2009, 34 campuses took part, administering an online questionnaire to a random sample of approximately 1,000 graduating students at each school. More than 12,000 students responded to questions about everything from academics to support services.

SATISFACTION WITH YOUR UNIVERSITY’S COMMITMENT TO

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY


The CUSC survey is an annual survey with a focus on student satisfaction. In 2009, 34 campuses took part, administering an online questionnaire to a random sample of approximately 1,000 graduating students at each school. More than 12,000 students responded to questions about everything from academics to support services.

HAS YOUR EXPERIENCE AT THIS UNIVERSITY EXCEEDED, MET, OR FALLEN SHORT OF YOUR EXPECTATIONS?





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2010 University Student Surveys: web-exclusive charts

  1. This is a silly survey. There is NO strong relationship between these “feely” questions and issues of academic excellence, intellectual challenge, and the quality and level of information you are getting. If you think that a prof from Redeemer is even close to having the expertise and intellectual power of prof from, say McGill or Toronto, they you are living in goo-goo land and have no idea about how universities operate. The best students go to the best universities where the best profs teach. And that is that. For example, the very first question seems to suggest that class discussion is to be valued extremely highly. Nonsense. If you go, say, Harvard, easily the best university in the world, you may have a large lecture class, with no “discussion” at all–oh, and it may be taught by someone who has won the Nobel prize.

  2. I thought I’d recently read results from Queen’s University about this same survey (unless it was a very very similar one)…

    However I don’t see Queen’s U listed here – not even “declined to make this information public”. WTH?

  3. Some people assume that the status of the professor (Nobel Prize, academic honors) is a measure of the quality of education that his/her students receive. Education is a much broader experience than that of a talking head in a class of 500 students. Small universities are indeed succeeding in the educational enterprise precisely because students feel more directly involved in their education, more able to have personal access to their professors, more likely to have discussions in class, and more likely to have their questions answered. Do these elements trump the status of big-name academics in big institutions? Surveys like this one are saying “yes.” Don’t forget that students are no dumbies. They know what a good education should look like, just as they understand when their education is being dumbed down or when they are being disengaged from their own learning by enormous classes or professors who cannot get involved in their lives.

  4. Good point Rajil, but with the “student is customer, and customer is king” mindset of many university administrations, the administrators and recruiters do pay attention to these unscientific polls.

    Redeemer University students seem to be a resolutely postive and unified crew: 99, 100, 97, 97 96 and 96 percent “agreed” on all the positively worded questions. It must be a happy place! Trinity Western, another religious university, is also not far behind.

  5. Rajil and Brian, you both have valid points; moreover, in addition to the more renowned professors, these larger institutions often have greater resources available to the student. However, I believe that the “feely” aspects of an education are of great importance. I am a very proud, recent graduate of Trinity Western University, as Brian points out, a “happy,” “religious university.” However, I also had the opportunity of spending a semester as a visiting student at Oxford University, a school right up there with Harvard. The quality of education that I received at TWU easily compares with that which I experienced at Oxford.

    While smaller institutions do not have the same reputation or the same resources, I miss the library at Oxford, they have ‘amazing’ faculty members. The faculty may not publish as much as those world famous scholars that are held in such reverence, but it is usually because they focus on teaching their students, and they love what they do. The faculty members at TWU that I worked closely with, often one on one, are qualified scholars, pursuing expertise in their particular field; however, they are equally interested in the academic pursuits of their students. They are passionate about educating others. This translates into an atmosphere in which students and faculty are mutually encouraged. Please, do not underestimate the value of being satisfied, content, and happy with you education. As the old adage goes, “a happy worker is a productive worker.” When students are content with their education they are inevitably moved to greater effort and success, than a student who is dissatisfied and feeling ignored.

  6. Here it comes again — the ever-predictable responses based in the ridiculous notion that religious conviction nullifies academic excellence.

    Rajil — I’ll have you know in my time at Redeemer obtaining my B.A., I was taught by faculty members who obtained their PHDs at Oxford, Mac, UofT, University of Waterloo and Harvard to name a few. These faculty members were regularly publishing materials respected and used by global and local, secular and religious communities. Many of them routinely traveled the globe to broaden their knowledge base, and then returned present only the highest quality material to their students.

    I’m currently perusing my Masters at York U, and feel completely prepared by my studies at Redeemer University College. The quality of education I received their is 100% comparable to the education I’m receiving now. I think most of the Redeemer Alum perusing further education at other universities would agree. Maybe you should ask a few of them.

    Now, tell me, have you ever attended a “touchy feely” school like Redeemer in order to give your opinion some clout?

  7. Julia: “The quality of education I received their is 100% comparable to the education I’m receiving now”

    Haha! “There”, not “their”! Unfortunate timing. The ironing is delicious.

  8. I caught that as soon as I posted it. I longed for an Edit: Undo function. Darn!

  9. Yes, I just love the taste of fershly ironed clothes…was that last spelling error intentional, or just even more irony?

  10. Google “ironing is delicious”. Then you’ll see what I did their. Apparently no one watches the Simpsons anymore.

    LAWLS!

  11. The best university for the best education? In my experience some of the best prof’s are the one’s who aren’t the top in their respective field. It really doesn’t matter which university you attend at the undergraduate level so who cares about that. If anything it’s better to go to a smaller and less well known school during your undergrad, I went to a small university and I was able to do research and got an NSERC after my second year! I don’t think that would have happened had I gone to the more bigger and well known universities. At the graduate level it’s really dependent on who you’re supervisor is and what your project is on. Of course I’m speaking from a science point of view doing a thesis based MSc or PhD.

  12. I’m with Rajil on this one. I suspect that the vast majority of undergrads have only ever attended the one university they are currently enrolled at. Thus, to put it bluntly, they don’t know what they’re missing. As someone who did a milk run of schools to get my transfer credits, I’m often astounded at the positive rankings given to mediocre schools and the mediocre rankings given to good ones. If anything, I’m inclined above all to take this as a measure of critical thinking levels among the school’s students.

    I must respectfully disagree with Bill on this. If I may be so un PC as to say it, I think some schools’ students are, on average, quite dumb. That’s why they have ended up in certain schools to begin with and that is why they are not able to spot an unqualified professor or a course that has been “dumbed down.” After all, why do you think it was dumbed down to begin with?

  13. I think any type of “ranking” is always going to be too subjective. I also believe it really depends on the specific programme. How can anybody say that U of “X” is better than U of “Y”? It’s just too general a statement. “X” might be a great school for Science, but not for Performing Arts. “Y” might be a very good place to study Engineering or Technology, but their Health Sciences programmes might not be as strong.

    I know plenty of students who end up choosing a specific school based solely on rankings and status, and it’s really a shame. My niece for example, chose a specific school just because it has a rather high “status symbol” air about it, and it’s also where most of her friends chose to go. There is nothing special about her programme of study, and many good schools in the province also offer the same programme. However, her choice is putting her family under great financial stress, just so she can be with her friends, and tell people she goes to “_______ University.”. In fact, she chose the school first, and then had to decide on the area of study, based on what this particular school offers.

    I think families should spend more time looking at all the options, and looking at the schools that offer the programme that the student is interested in. Weigh all the factors, including cost, distance from home, class sizes, staff to student ratios, facilities and resources, and if possible visit as many of the schools as possible so you can get a feel for each one. As every student is different and learns in a different way, what is best for one student is not necessarily best for another. Some students thrive under pressure and enjoy the energy of being part of a large group. Other students do better in more intimate relaxed settings. Some students are better prepared to study (and succeed) away from home than others.

    Don’t base your choice on a published ranking, or a popularity contest.

    Find out which school best suits YOUR academic and career needs. Who cares what anybody else thinks?

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