Blatchford wanted to speak amidst protest - Macleans.ca
 

Blatchford wanted to speak amidst protest

Says police should have removed students occupying stage


 

Globe and Mail columnist Christie Blatchford regrets not being able to give a scheduled talk at the University of Waterloo on Friday. Her speech was cancelled after a group of protesters occupied the stage and taunted Blatchford as a “racist” from the audience. The protest was in reaction to Blatchford’s new book Helpless: Caledonia’s Nightmare of Fear and Anarchy, and How the Law Failed All of Us. Blatchford’s publicist and university security did not permit her to take the stage for fear they would not be able to protect her. The columnist would have handled things different if she were in charge, according to the Waterloo Record. “If it had been my university, I would have had the police remove them from the stage,” she said


 
Filed under:

Blatchford wanted to speak amidst protest

  1. ahh.. the irony.

    I guess Blanchford and the protesters both proved their points, and the university officials are worse than useless, and should be fired and black-listed for incompetence.

  2. I certainly can’t blame the protesting students. The political thought (such that it is) displayed by these young people is celeberated by the academics that teach them – in our universities and now, increasingly, in our high schools.

  3. The protesters call themselves the “Anti Racist Action” and, according to their web site, they didn’t want me to hear what Ms. Blatchford had to say because they thought her comments would “divide our community on the basis of race and class” and “poison the minds” of those in attendance. Thank goodness I have these people around to protect me from making my own assessment of what I find racist or acceptable. They saved me from myself. Quite the public service. Very similar to the service so generously offered to the people of North Korea, Myanmar, Iran, China, and so forth.

  4. I blush to think that it was the university where I taught for 41 years (and still do, a bit) where this happened. And I second the comments of “Clancy” above. Mindless protests seem to be the order of the day, once again….

  5. Cha-ching!!!

    I can hear the cash register bells ringing as this book starts flying off the shelves!!!

    Why? Because a small group protested it.

    Christie will be laughing all the way to the bank!!!

  6. Again, the apparent tolerant ones illustrate how hypocritical they are and self-indulged, shame on you for trying to build a resume! I live the horror and continue to deal with the fall out in my town, the book is not racist at all, it is about the absence of the rule of law and how it is to be applied to all, and “was” not in Caledonia.

  7. I heard Jim Richards speak with the students spokesperson Tallula Marigold and her condesending voice that made we wince.

    How Ricards kept his cool throughout the segment was a miracle.

    I am not sure what her message and agenda was but it was not to listen to the facts about the lack of law enforcement at Caledonia and the students would be better served by someone without her agenda and horrible voice with an attitude.

    The students were not well served and certainly learned free speech at it’s worst.

    That’s it Tallula Marigold says it all.

  8. Although I somewhat approve of Tallula Marigold, I propose, in solidarity with the masses, that she go on a long march of at least 1000 miles, to rid her diseased mind of residual Soviet-style brainwashing.

  9. Christie Blatchford dismisses Aboriginal rights, in her myopic version of “rule of law” in Canada. However, her racism is in characterizing Six Nations people as “native thugs”.

    She regurgitates Gary McHale’s distorted tales, a dubious source, making victims out of people who harassed Six Nations.
    And what’s with the burning cross on the cover?