Say that in English, please. - Macleans.ca

Say that in English, please.

Quebec teachers’ union says English CEGEPs are having a ‘negative’ impact on French

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Despite laws that require non-anglophones to attend French primary and secondary schools, an increasing number of students in Quebec are pursuing post-secondary education in English.

A Quebec teachers’ union commissioned a study to investigate this “worrisome” situation. The results of the study, which were released Thursday, indicate that most students who attend English CEGEP (a two- or three-year program that’s the Quebec equivalent of junior college) are planning on continuing their education in English or working in English.

Although only the children of parents who studied English in Canada are permitted a primary and secondary education in English, after high school students can attend school in any language they want. Faced with this choice, many Quebec students are turning towards English, supposedly with the motivation of becoming perfectly bilingual.

The study concludes that “In light of the results presented in this report, it appears clear that the linguistic impact of English CEGEPs is having negative repercussions on the objective of making French the common language in Quebec society.”

Say that in English, please.
Study finds an increasing number of Quebec students switching to English after high school

Despite laws that require non-anglophones to attend French primary and secondary schools, an increasing number of students in Quebec are pursuing post-secondary education in English.

According to an article from the Canadian Press, a Quebec teachers’ union commissioned a study to investigate this “worrisome” situation. The results of the study, which were released Thursday, indicate that most students who attend English CEGEP (a two- or three-year program that’s the Quebec equivalent of junior college) are planning on continuing their education in English or working in English.

Although only the children of parents who studied English in Canada are permitted a primary and secondary education in English, after high school students can attend school in any language they want. Faced with this choice, many Quebec students are turning towards English, supposedly with the motivation of becoming perfectly bilingual.

The study concludes that “In light of the results presented in this report, it appears clear that the linguistic impact of English CEGEPs is having negative repercussions on the objective of making French the common language in Quebec society.”