Students suspended for draping themselves in duct tape - Macleans.ca
 

Students suspended for draping themselves in duct tape

Catholic school board says uniforms too revealing


 

A Windsor high school student says she and several others were unfairly punished after they donned duct tape uniforms to a hockey game in December. The students were suspended when school reopened after the break because of a policy at St. Joseph’s school that prohibits the uniforms. Wearing the costumes had previously been an annual tradition during the Father Zakoor Catholic Cup, but they had been banned in response parent complaints that they were becoming too revealing. Carole Farah told Postmedia that her and the other participating girls wore t-shirts under the duct tape and that no skin was showing.


 
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Students suspended for draping themselves in duct tape

  1. Although it sounds like the girls took every precaution to be modest, a ban is a ban and they broke the rules. That’s not to say that it probably wasn’t a fun tradition however.

  2. When deciding on a uniform policy, all schools are expected to give high priority to cost considerations. No school uniform should be so expensive as to leave pupils or their families feeling excluded.

    The cost of a uniform should not stop parents from sending their child to the school of their choice. Governing bodies should consult parents for their views and concerns before changing or deciding on a new uniform policy.

    In England some local authorities provide discretionary grants to help with buying school uniforms. Local authorities that offer these grants set their own criteria for eligibility.

    Schools can help limit the expense of uniforms by choosing a colour scheme rather than a full uniform or by ensuring that the uniform chosen is widely available in high street shops rather than a sole supplier.