Vanier Scholarships by the numbers - Macleans.ca
 

Vanier Scholarships by the numbers

Which schools got the most $150,000 research awards?


 

Stephen Harper presented 167 Vanier Graduate Scholarships last week at McMaster University. At $150,000 apiece, they’re the most highly sought after prizes for doctoral students studying in Canada.

Schools may only nominate a set number of students based how much money they have received in the past, which gives established PhD programs a clear advantage.

That said, the distribution of the awards tells us something about where the country’s most highly sought after researchers have chosen to study. Here’s the school-by-school breakdown.

Toronto — 28
British Columbia — 25
McGill — 25
Montréal — 12
Alberta — 11
Ottawa — 9
Calgary — 8
McMaster — 6
Western Ontario — 6
Waterloo — 5
Simon Fraser — 4
Laval — 4
Polytechnique Montréal — 3
Queen’s — 3
Dalhousie — 2
UQAM — 2
York — 2
Guelph — 2
Manitoba — 2
Victoria — 1
Concordia — 1
Sherbrooke — 1
Trent — 1
Regina — 1
Saskatchewan — 1
Saint Mary’s — 1


 

Vanier Scholarships by the numbers

  1. I would be interested in seeing the “per capita” breakdown…obviously larger universities like U of T are going to receive more scholarships.

  2. Hi

    Like most of the federal granting and scholarship programs, the Vanier Scholarships favor institutions and provinces that are already advantaged. The province of Manitoba, for example, has about 3.7% of Canada’s population but received only 2 of 167 awards (1.2%). The federal programs are increasingly designed to exacerbate regional disparities.

  3. Apart from the asymmetric distribution, the other big problem with the Vanier’s is the colossal waste of money. The large stipends lavished on a relatively small number of recipients could be much better applied to the underfunded PGS program. There are much better ways to benefit HQP training in Canada.