As many as 600 detainees may have been handed over - Macleans.ca
 

As many as 600 detainees may have been handed over

British government releases figures on detainee transfers


 

Just how many detainees did Canadian soldiers hand over to Afghan authorities who, according to Canadian diplomat Richard Colvin, more than likely tortured them? The government isn’t saying, but based on numbers released by the British government, it could be as many as 600. British authorities claim their soldiers took 97 Afghans into custody before transferring them to Afghan officials between the start of 2006 and the summer of 2007. During his testimony before a Commons committee, Colvin said Canada had transferred six times as many as the British, putting the Canadian tally somewhere around 600. Colvin also testified many of the detainees transferred by Canada had likely committed no crime. “Some of these Afghans may have been footsoldiers or day fighters,” he said, “but many were just local people, farmers, truck drivers, tailors, peasants, random human beings in the wrong place at the wrong time, young men in their fields and villages, who were completely innocent, but were nevertheless rounded up.”

Ottawa Citizen

 


 
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As many as 600 detainees may have been handed over

  1. Sigh…food chain…time for lunch.

  2. According to the Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission, who conducted a survey of some 10,000 people who had contact with the Afghan justice system, "torture and other cruel, inhuman, and degrading treatment are a commonplace practice in the majority of law enforcement institutions and that at least 98.5% of interviewees believed they had been tortured by these institutions."
    http://www.aihrc.org.af/english/Eng_pages/Researc

    That suggests more than 600 X 0.985 = 591 war crimes, in which Canadian soldiers are now implicated.

    What the HELL are we doing over there?

    Bring our troops home.

    • I don't think any one really believes our soldiers are implicated, – or they shouldn't be. You'd have to prove intent as well as prior knowledge for that. However, Colvin's testimony among others certainly raises the possibility that people higher up the food change did or ought to have known, and may well have participated in a cover-up. The average soldier is likely to be as offended by the notion that innocent Afghans may have been abused as a reult of our negligence, as any one on these boards…indeed more so.

      • No one in Canada will see our soldiers as implicated but I expect the Afghans who have been tortured see that differently – I would in their shoes. Our forces are there supporting a corrupt regime and (however unknowingly) the torture of its citizens. Similarly, Canadians don't fly the drones that shell and kill civilians but I doubt we stand out as being any different from the US forces who do.

        Bring them home.

  3. torture and other cruel, inhuman, and degrading treatment are a commonplace practice in the majority of law enforcement institutions and that at least 98.5% of interviewees believed they had been tortured by these institutions.

    Ergo, we should leave them to their fate?

    I do not follow.