Austerity regime met with protests in Greece - Macleans.ca
 

Austerity regime met with protests in Greece

Cars smashed, buildings firebombed in violent clashes


 

Rioting in Greece has reached a fever pitch in the worst clashes between protesters and police since the start of Greece’s financial crisis. Hundreds of protesters took to the streets and clashed with riot police across central Athens, smashing cars and sidewalks, hurling gasoline bombs into buildings, and burning cars during a nationwide labour protest against the government’s latest austerity measures. Police fired tear gas and flash grenades as the violence escalated. But that failed to stop people wearing black masks and ski goggles, who used sledgehammers to smash paving stones and hurled the rubble at police. The protest was provoked by a vote in parliament on new labour reforms that include deeper pay cuts, salary caps and involuntary staff transfers at state companies. The new law also reduces unions’ collective bargaining power in the private sector, allowing employers to substantially cut salaries.

CBC News


 
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Austerity regime met with protests in Greece

  1. Hundreds of protesters took to the streets and clashed with riot police across central Athens, smashing cars and sidewalks, hurling gasoline bombs into buildings, and burning cars during a nationwide labour protest against the government's latest austerity measures.

    That'll free up a few dollars.

  2. You've got to give it to the Greeks. Disagree with the rioting all you want, at least when their government does something they don't like they actually /do/ something.

    • Yeah, destroying public property is really a great way to cut expenditures. They're making soccer rioters look intelligent.

      • You're right. They should organize a campaign to send strongly worded letters to their representatives en masse. Or they could wait a few years and elect a fresh batch of liars to rescue them from their troubles.

        When all avenues for effectual participation in politics have been closed off, there's little else one can do besides break stuff.

        • In the end it will result in more cuts, not less. The money is gone… gone… gone. Breaking things won't solve that. This is just a child's temper tantrum.

          • The point of rioting isn't to generate money. It's supposed to be punishment for those responsible for the austerity measures. Like when you spank a child that's done something wrong – it doesn't necessarily do anything to improve the immediate situation, but it gives them an idea of what to expect if they decide to do it again.

            Personally I think there are more constructive things they could be doing, but I've got to give them credit for caring enough to actually do something. I guess I take it as a truism that someone who cares about democracy should take action when their government enacts a deeply unpopular policy. It's just good to see that people in Greece actually care.

          • "The money is gone"

            In which case the Greeks should separate themselves from the EU, reestablish their own central bank and currency and distribute money directly to businesses and individuals at low interest rates. Seeing as the Greek government will be creating the money it will be debt-free and not burdened with the IMF structural adjustment plan designed to put average people and their national government's further into debt bondage by undemocratic institutions.

  3. good to see yesterday's evil culture finally being brought to their Knees

  4. Protests? Rioting? Pshaw!

    That's just a collective popular effort to bring some much-needed Keynesian stimulus. Dig a hole, repair a hole. Break a window, repair a window. Firebomb a business, rebuild a business. Destroy a couple city buses, order a couple more buses. Kill a few bank tellers, …, …, …, uh…

  5. "…hurling gasoline bombs into buildings…"

    The clip I saw on the news showed at least one molotov cocktail thrown AT the police. It exploded right by an officer's feet. That 's a great way to get someone (police, protester, or innocent bystander) killed.