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Charest seeks to deter student protesters with threat of hefty fines


 

Quebec Premier Jean Charest has proposed legislation that will crack down on student protesters and the unions that support them.

He is seeking tough new measures that would bar demonstrations inside and within 50 metres of university buildings, the Globe and Mail reports. Additionally, any protester found guilty of causing the cancellation of classes could be fined between $1,000 and $5,000. If the same offence is committed by a leader of a student organization, the fine could be as much as $35,000. If a group or student federation stops others from attending class, it could be forced to pay up to $125,000. For protesting groups of  10 or more people, there will also be a requirement to inform police at least eight hours in advance of a demonstration.

The legislation, called Bill 78, is expected to pass through Quebec’s National Assembly on Friday, but it will expire on July 1, 2013, the Globe and Mail reports.

Stéphane Beaulac, a constitutional expert at the University of Montreal, told the CBC that the law is one of the most repressive he has ever seen, but that it doesn’t appear to violate the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. “On the face of it, it does not constitute in my view blatant infringement of freedom of association, freedom of expression,” he was quoted as saying.

Student groups, unsurprisingly, have rallied against the bill, setting up a website for people to sign an anti-Bill 78 petition. “This is actually a declaration of war against the student movement and not only against the student movement, but it restricted the liberty of speech, the liberty of association,” said Martine Desjardins of the university students’ federation, the FEUQ, quoted by the CBC.


 
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Charest seeks to deter student protesters with threat of hefty fines

  1. Canadas version of Les Miserables.

  2. It time for a revolution and send that
    thievish clown (Premier Jean Charest) in retirement.

  3. It was never been made clear enough to the greater Québec population (who actually agreed +/- 70% with the government) that this noisy, intrusive “student movement” really only represented a very small sample; at last count, +/- 20% of radical students (mostly in sociology, philosophy, poly /sci and comparative literature) who actually finally voted to continue their “strike” ( which really should have been considerd just a boycott of classes?). These young idealistic students, who will probably eventually find work within the closed network of CEGEP (the Québec “free” college system) teachers, union-organisers and NGO community organisers, are presently being encouraged, incited, abetted and groomed to become the next generation (la relève) who will continue to promote the redundant/irrealistic/anti-capitalist/anti-government manifestations of the chronically unsatisfied leftists. The PQ (Parti-Québecois) also recently and recklessly jumped into the frenzy, hoping to make political points for a future election. Multiple surveys in the last 3 months confirmed again and again that more than 2/3 of the students and the general population had reluctantly accepted the inevitable but necessary rise in tuition fees even if they would obviously prefer to pay less (and who wouldn’t?) The media, hungry for sensational news, hung onto every word from the arrogant, yet eloquent, student leaders of the 20% protesters as they encouraged (with the help of the unions) the naive, over-agitated students towards civil disobedience, all in the name of what they claimed as “Democracy”. The Government, like many of us Québecers, had done little hoping that reason and common sense would eventually prevail. Think again, we are in Quebec. In the name of political correctness, individual rights, partisan politics etc. we have finally allowed anarchy to take over our streets to the point that we are now obliged to respond by become a repressive, police state. How did the Hell did we manage to get here?? I am ashamed to be a Quebecer.
    continue their “strike” ( which really should have been considerd just a boycott of classes)?. These young idealistic students, who will probably eventually find work within the closed network of CEGEP (the Québec “free” college system) teachers, union-organisers and NGO community organisers, are presently being encouraged, incited, abetted and groomed to become the next generation (la relève) who will continue to promote the redundant/irrealistic/anti-capitalist/anti-government manifestations of the chronically unsatisfied leftists. The PQ (Parti-Québecois) also recently and recklessly jumped into the frenzy, hoping to make political points for a future election. Multiple surveys in the last 3 months confirmed again and again that more than 2/3 of the students and the general population had reluctantly accepted the inevitable but necessary rise in tuition fees even if they would obviously prefer to pay less (and who wouldn’t?) The media, hungry for sensational news, hung onto every word from the arrogant, yet eloquent, student leaders of the 20% protesters as they encouraged (with the help of the unions) naive, over-agitated students towards civil disobedience, all in the name of so-called “Democracy”. The Government, like many of us Québecers, had done little hoping that reason and common sense would eventually prevail. Think again, Quebec. In the name of political correctness, individual rights, good politics etc etc. we have finally allowed anarchy to take over our streets to the point that we are now obliged to respond by become a repressive, police state. How did the Hell did we manage to get here?? I am ashamed to be a Quebecer.

    • please ignore redundant second paragraph = computer error :-(

  4. Isolationism, tribalism, entitlement, and academic marxist indoctrination= useful idiots.

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