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Death by global warming: Quebecers at risk


 

Global warming doesn’t just put polar bears at risk. Researchers at Quebec City’s Université Laval predict that, by the year 2080, the province could see its mortality rate jump by up to 15 per cent in the summer months—meaning an extra 540 deaths per summer in Montreal alone, compared to the city’s 1981-1999 average (see graph below). This isn’t a new concept—studies in the U.K. have shown similar results for summer mortality, The National Review of Medicine reports.


 

Death by global warming: Quebecers at risk

  1. Deterrence has both a specific and general element – it’s supposed to not only stop others in the future, but the perpetrator as well. What message do we send this self-absorbed blowhard if the chief result of his misdeeds is that the ‘leader of the free world’ hand-picks him for special treatment not accorded the hoi polloi, telling him he need not worry because his friends are there for him?

    • Mike T. For the record, the first 20 or so people pardoned by GWB at the end of 2008 were the hoi polloi. No big names picked for “special treatment” in that group at all.

      As for Black, he is now, and always will be, prevented from running a public company whether he is in jail or not. Is that not deterrence enough? Not enough blood for you?

      • if the first part is indeed true (it may very well be, in fact),please consider the comment amended to “not GENERALLY accorded the hoi polloi”.

        As for the second, that raises an interesting point – would a full pardon allow him to run a company again?

        But no, a mere ban on directing a company is not enough. Black acted in a manner no better than a crooked three card monty dealer, and deliberately disobeyed court orders. He deserves what he got.

  2. Let out the thousands of people imprisoned for 20 years or more for minor drug offences in the USA first, and you might get some sympathy from me for Conrad.

    • Amen, brother.

    • M@, Would you be so kind as to tell us just how many people there are who have been imprisoned for 20 years or more for “minor” drug offenses? And maybe you could tell us what “minor” is.

      • Possession of marijuana, for instance: in a state with a “three strikes” law that can mean life in prison.

    • Your not American M@. So why would you care how many people are in prison in the US for “minor” drug offenses? As for Conrad Black-he ran up against a United States Attourney-they have alot of power south of the border. Not even the Canadian government could of come to his rescue. So let’s be real & pragmaric here.

      • He is not a Canadian citizen. Why would our govt go to bat for him? I didn’t see Great Britain standing up for him. He has moved on to bigger and better things. Let him enjoy the fruits of his labour…too bad it isn’t hard labour…convicted felon…thief…

  3. “Much of his personal fortune has been decimated by his long and ongoing legal struggle.”

    I think he lost much more than that. “Annihilated” would be more appropriate.

    See http://www.lssu.edu/banished/archive/2008.php

    • How much from legal fees, and how much from the discovery that he was fleecing his shareholders?

  4. The public antipathy toward Black in this country is fuelled by wounded national pride at his decision to walk away from his citizenship, and a sense of grievance over his personal style and politics.

    Not me. Black displayed contempt for Canada and Canadians themselves. He described Canada has a nation suffering from a “pandemic of spirit envy” and described our social safety net as “a hammock,” “dragnet for the aggrieved” and “endowed martyrdom.” It would have been fine if he had directed his withering disdain at the people with whom he associated. I don’t know why the rest of us had to be condemned.

    Now public antipathy isn’t a reason to keep him locked up; that’s what the sentence is for. Given the rash of corporate fraud lately, I am unmoved entirely by his plight. Besides, the prison sounds a lot nicer than the hammocks plenty of people are stuck with, if they’re lucky to have a hammock at all.

  5. “Leaving him parked in a jail cell only adds one more broken life to the tab of America’s overburdened prison system.”

    This guy i no where near the front of the line of those aggrieved by the legal/penal system in the US. starting with him makes clear there is one system for the rich and another for everyone else.

  6. What have you got against Britain? What have we done to deserve Canadian crooks being dumped on us? We have quite enough of our own, thank you!

    • Fintan……I can’t help but think that you might have a serious personal problem with the Black’s. You obviously read everything by, and about, them and rarely fail to comment. Evidently they have a greater power over you than they ever had at any time, and you seem to take them far more seriously than they even take themselves. Should Black be deported to Britain after his sentence is complete, and choses to live in law abiding obscurity, or simply fades away as you claim to wish for, you won’t have a thing to do with your time.

      The funny (sad) thing is that while you obsess about Conrad and Barbara, they haven’t got a clue of your existence….unless, of course ,you are one of those true nut cases who send letters directly to, and stalk, the people they can’t seem to get out of their minds.

      • What a silly comment, Louise! I happen to have plenty of time on my hands, a really fast broadband connection, and enjoy having a good snigger at that absurd pair. Believe me, I have lots of other interests as well. But thank you for your concern. LOL

        I am hardly the only person who has observed the antics of the Blacks over the years and is now indulging in a little – well, OK, actually a lot of – Schadenfreude at their self-inflicted misfortune.

        I really must comment when a columnist recommends the pardoning of a person who is clearly guilty and had the best possible defence, while others who had no chance at all and stole far less than Lordy languish in prison with no one calling for them to be given a break.
        .
        By the way, you are incorrect when you write [Lord Blackula and Morticia] “haven’t got a clue of your existence….unless, of course ,you are one of those true nut cases who send letters directly to, and stalk, the people they can’t seem to get out of their minds…”

        They know exactly who I am, and I have never sent a letter to them or any other person in the public eye with whom I am not acquainted.

        Enjoy your weekend.

    • I believe British is the only citizenship he has left. Having repudiated his Canadian citizenship, he is no longer a ‘Canadian’ crook.

      • That was a reply to Tony’s post. Haven’t quite got the hang of this reply thing yet.

    • What have we done to deserve Canadian crooks being dumped on us?

      You called us boring.

      Words hurt!

      • We should sue.

    • Yes, well, sorry about that.

      But we TRIED to warn you.

  7. What a silly comment, Louise! I happen to have plenty of time on my hands, a really fast broadband connection, and enjoy having a good sn1gger at that absurd pair. Believe me, I have lots of other interests as well. But thank you for your concern. LOL

    I am hardly the only person who has observed the antics of the Blacks over the years and is now indulging in a little – well, OK, actually a lot of – Schadenfreude at their self-inflicted misfortune.

    I really must comment when a columnist recommends the pardoning of a person who is clearly guilty and had the best possible defence, while others who had no chance at all and stole far less than Lordy languish in prison with no one calling for them to be given a break.

    By the way, you are incorrect when you write [Lord Blackula and Morticia] “haven’t got a clue of your existence….unless, of course ,you are one of those true nut cases who send letters directly to, and stalk, the people they can’t seem to get out of their minds…”

    They know exactly who I am, and I have never sent a letter to them or any other person in the public eye with whom I am not acquainted.

    Enjoy your weekend.
    .

  8. It is depressing to see the vindictive and petty pleasure that people take from Conrad Black’s conviction and imprisonment. Of course there are thousands of Americans just as or even more worthy of a pardon, but that is hardly a reason to continue to keep him locked up.

    The whole affair is a sad indictment of a justice system (one which we are starting to emulate here in some respects) which is grinding up vast numbers of lives in pursuit of no worthwhile purpose.

    I applaud Conrad Black’s refusal to deal or negotiate with this system; he is in prison simply because he declined to confess to the fantasy crimes he was accused of, and has since refused to give up his claim of innocence. No-one has to like or admire him, no-one has to agree with his political views, no-one has to respect his business dealings to recognize that it is absurd that he is serving over six years in prison.

    • ” … he is in prison simply because he declined to confess to the fantasy crimes he was accused of, and has since refused to give up his claim of innocence…”

      Wrong, Bill, they are not “fantasy” crimes. That he committed them was established by a jury after a four-month trial in which he enjoyed the assistance of a defence team that cost him and, especially, others millions of dollars. Many believe that same defence team did a sterling job in getting him off on the other charges. Good for them, but how many of those who could be described as unjustly incarcerated in the USA had that kind of defence? And how many columnists are suffering bleeding heart attacks over them?

      Then his appeal was shot down and it looks extremely unlikely that the Supreme Court will even deliberate his case, must less quash his conviction.

      That is why he is in prison.

      He could have done like his accomplice David Radler did: recognise that the jig was up, come clean, save the authorities a lot of bother, do his porridge and get on with his life, but His Lardship seems to like a battle rather than act reasonably.

      I also disagree with you when you write. “Of course there are thousands of Americans just as or even more worthy of a pardon, but that is hardly a reason to continue to keep him locked up.”

      Unless those equally or more worthy of a pardon are pardoned before he is or at the same time, it will send out a completely wrong message. If they are let out, then by all means let him out, too.

      His Lardship is perfectly entitled to maintain his claim of innocence, but American society is just as entitled to protect itself from unrepentant wrongdoers.

      As for British society, read some UK papers and see how much people complain about courts there being too soft on criminals.

      The Daily Torygraph was not famous for its liberal policy with respect to criminals when he was running the show there.

      • Fintan, Once my response to Mike (above) is vetted by the moderators, you can read the links I posted from MSNBC listing over 30 people (some by name and crime, others just by their crime) who were pardoned by President Bush in November and December, 2008. I would be interested to know whether or not you considered these individuals “equally or more worthy of pardon” that Black is…..and why you think you have the ultimate say :-)

        • Dear Louise, I do not have anything like the detailed familiarity with the cases of the 30 pardoned persons that I have with the Black case (you chided me earlier for reading “everything by, and about,” Lord Crossdresser and Morticia, which I would have thought is a good thing to do when one wishes to comment on anything LOL) and therefore have no opinion as to whether they deserved their pardons, but the lack of any public outcry would indicate that they did.

          Anyway, good for them. They are among the lucky few if, as some have said, there are thousands of unjustly incarcerated unfortunates in the USA.

          I can find the links you mention on my own.

          And where did you get the idea that I think I have the ultimate say? In what? Please don’t impute views to me that I do not hold. I am more than capable of expressing those that I have.

          However, we live in the Internet era and nowadays even ordinary people like me can say our tuppence ha’penny worth, unlike in the days when a “letter to the editor” of one of the newspapers or magazines controlled by His Lardship had no hope of being published if it did not conform to his view of the world.

          Too bad if it upsets you!

          Now, have a nice Friday evening.

          • “Anyway, good for them. They are among the lucky few if, as some have said, there are thousands of unjustly incarcerated unfortunates in the USA.”

            As you know, pardons, commutations of sentences and clemency are all given (almost simply) at the pleasure of the person occupying the position of President of the United States. The person receiving the pardon, however, may not necessarily have been “unjustly incarcerated”. That is why Mr. Maich has argued (well IMO) that Black should be released from prison..”. not because he’s innocent, but because there is nothing more to be achieved from his incarceration”…….. except to please the vindictive and petty people out there who have nothing better (or positive) to think about or comment on.

            With that I shall indeed have a nice Friday evening. And wish the same to you…..

          • “except to please the vindictive and petty people out there who have nothing better (or positive) to think about or comment on”

            Dear Louise, you really should try not to be so quick to label people with words like “vindictive” and “petty”, just because they express views that do not please you. And, if it’s OK with you, I’ll choose what to comment on, free citizen that I am. Naturally, I respect your right to do the same.

            Now, it’s way past my bedtime and I really need my beauty sleep, so it’s off to the scratcher for me.

          • “except to please the vindictive and petty people out there who have nothing better (or positive) to think about or comment on.”

            Of course, there is the small matter of satisfying the gods’ thirst for vengeance. Ask yourself this: do you really want us all to suffer from the plague, famine, and leprosy they would unleash if Lord Black were pardoned? Not so easy to choose now, is it?

    • I think he should be paroled, although he shouldn’t have been imprisoned in the first place. What he’s been incriminated with hardly makes him a danger or menace to the society.
      The fact that he lost his fortune, his good name and his business was harsh enough, this is without getting into the legal and juridical aspects of the issue.
      Speaking of justice, there are millions of scumbag wife beaters out there who never get sentenced to prison, because they play the “guilty and send me to anger management, and I will change” card, but yay, at least they jailed a senior citizen who allegedly stole lots of money from his wealthy accomplices. God bless America!

      • He stole money from his shareholders! It’s no different than if you or I were to pluck purses off old ladies’ arms in the street.

        • It’s a curious tendency among certain people to grandly demonstrate charity and mercy only with respect to figures who are also grand. Lord Black of Crossharbour is larger than life; his travails, whether it be incarceration or indigestion, are more impressive per se, and thus his need for compassion and forgiveness, more acute and pressing.

          • If he were St. Francis of Assisi, I might buy into that. But when a man spends most of his life glorifying capitalism at its most selfish, together (I have no doubt) with many a raillery at the pusillanimity of the justice system (his style is infectious), how on earth can he or his apologists beg for mercy from the “cruel” system after he gets nailed for being an overly selfish capitalist?

            What’s interesting, as you say, is that not everyone who wants Black out of the clink has been bought & paid for. I guess there are a lot of people out there who wish they were worthy of being bought & paid for. One thing you have to hand it to Milord & Milady for: they’ve made ancient Roman satire of the parasite class seem like it was written yesterday.

            The tired clients wend their homeward way
            (Though hope for dinner is the last to say
            Goodnight) to buy their cabbage and their fuel;
            Meanwhile their king o’er fish and fowl will drool,
            Supping alone (though empty tables spread
            About are wide, antique, unblemishèd),
            His appetite his patrimony’s doom,
            His parasites endangered; yet to whom,
            Does luxury so miserly not stink?
            Down what a gullet can a whole boar sink?
            The beast was born for friendly cheer and drink!
            And yet you’ll pay when to the bath you puff
            With bloated belly, into which you’d stuff
            That unchewed peacock meat; then in the buff
            Alack! It’s death, without a testament:
            The happy news around the room is sent,
            Your funeral starts with cheers of ill-intent.

    • And no one has to let him out. What is absurd about it? An arrogant ass got caught, if not with his hand in the cookie jar, at the very least thumbing his nose at the justice system when he removed boxes of files from his office. Why on earth shouldn’t the justice system thumb him back?

      I don’t know of many people incarcerated who have a column in the Financial Post. Did you even read his wife’s take on the recession? So out of touch with reality as to be absurd. Oh! The poor country club! Give me a break. Until we, the hoi polloi, force these upper crust imbeciles to see that the world is not their oyster alone, they will continue to act as if it were. Their entitlements grow larger each year and if even one of them looks at Conrad Black sitting six years in a prison cell and thinks better of his actions, it will be worth it. If Lord Black sees the error of his arrogance in the meantime, so much the better.

    • Is Conrad incarcerated because he is unpopular or because he broke a law? How many people lost money due to his illegal acts? The miss-justice of Black’s languishing in a U.S. prison is that ,if his case was tried 10 years ago, the prosecution would not have obtained a guilty verdict. Being his own man, and not prone to take advice, he got caught up in the generational change. He forgot that there is no humour attributed with political correct! He is in jail because he defied a court order and removed his files. His contribution throughout his life to world intellectualism is his biggest ally. Brian should talk to George W to put an end to this miscarriage before January 20th..

  9. This is a guy who does not think he did anything wrong, as witnessed by his appeal to the US Supreme Court. I did not notice any articles regarding freeing the Enron or Worldcom guys so what is so special about Black. This is a person who bought his way into the House of Lords. Screwed thousands of his employees and share holders, has never acknowledged that he did anything wrong and was lucky that his former side kick did such a poor job that he got away with a conviction on only a few of the several counts. From last reports he seems to be finding prison life quite interesting and the only reason for his appeal is self vindication that he never did anything wrong. Let the guy enjoy his time there. we may even get an autobiography when he gets out.

  10. It’s not at all about taking ‘petty pleasure at his conviction and incarceration.’ That’s smoke and mirrors.
    It’s about justice, doing the allotted time for the crime, and as the article states, deterrence and retribution.
    If he still doesn’t think he’s done anything wrong, why should he be let out early? People that feel a sense of entitlement and experience no internal epiphany post-crime are not good candidates for early release based on their seemingly deluded failure to come to terms with reality. Those types are more likely good candidates for recidivism.

  11. Half my comments end up in the unmoderated moderation queue. What’s with the Conrad Black protection society at Maclean’s?

    Convinces me more than ever that the man needs to remain in prison for the full sentence. Anybody who scares journalists so much needs to be kept under lock and key, for their own protection. Are there any journalists left who haven’t been either cowed or bought by this kleptocrat?

    • jack M – The reach of Conrad is indeed long and his wrath terrible. You must try to remember he is a lord after all and due our deference.

      • Indeed, kc, his reach is long, but he finally overstretched himself, which is why he is now at Bubba’s beck and call. As for being a lord, he is an acute embarrassment to the House of Lords and even the Tories have withdrawn the whip = disowned him. Even someone like him, who undoubtedly has a neck like a jockey’s bollocks, will hardly dare show his disgraced face in the House after he is released and deported to Britain around October 2013 – if the British haven’t abolished the ridiculous and undemocratic upper house before then. Karma be praised!

        • karma be praised – not sure conrad will be abashed and is probably in good company in the HOL. the only way you can offend a man like him is to undo his lordship, so to speak. Which is why Chretien withheld it. Anybody but conrad would NOt want a pardon signed by W, he’ll wear it like a badge of honour. The only thing that seriously bugs me about Conrad is his blithe trading in of his citizenship for Whatever. His experience in prison will get him a few free meals on the look at what i’ve been doing in my spare time circuit. Just don’t just hand him back his citizenship.

  12. Most humans are petty and vindictive,. Especially when they deal with those who have accomplished more than they themselves can even “think” of achieving. Let’s face it, international business is far from a clean endeavor as we are discovering almost on a daily basis. And it’s not about to get any cleaner any time soon. It takes guts, cunning, and a certain amount of roguishness to succeed on a planetary level. What Conrad Black may or may not have done is nothing compared to what others have gotten away with. I DO enjoy the fact that the US government doesn’t get the irony of wasting vanishing tax dollars to house a foreign millionaire. I say, let him out. He’s learned about as much of a lesson as he is likely to learn and his family suffers more from his incarceration than he does. So I’m calling on Americans to get a sense of priority (maybe they can find one at WalMart – on sale) and send Mr. Black home.

    • Are you seriously suggesting that prison should only be for “losers” , that the successfull folks of this world should get a ” do not go to jail card”? Accountability has to start somewhere, why not at the top for a change.

    • Most humans are petty and vindictive,.

      That’s much truer of the elite than of the masses and ultimately, we have to thank Conrad Black for at least making that clear to the rest of us lesser beings.

      • Yeah, I really believe you’re a member of the masses Ti-Guy.

    • Conrad? is that you?

  13. I was astounded when Black was jailed. My estimation of the quality of American justice took a nose dive. He should go free immediately. He should not have been jailed for more than 30 days. What will Black write before he dies? And how long do I have to wait to see the movie… ‘Black’?

    • “What will Black write before he dies?” asks James Short.

      Unashamed and unrepentant scoundrel that he is, probably something like “Non, je ne regrette rien” – unless, of course, he can find some way of saying the same thing in 1,000 pages of turgid, pompous, sesquipedalian prose.

  14. Hee, hee, hee … His Lardship is always good for a good guffaw, but he has surpassed even himself in his latest offering in the Nazional Post:

    http://network.nationalpost.com/np/blogs/fullcomment/archive/2009/01/10/conrad-black-chicago-s-torquemada-claims-another-victim.aspx

    How lovely that he has finally found fault with any aspect of the USA and has even gone so far as to describe (in the second paragraph) Canada as an “advanced country”. Phew, what a road to Damascus thing, when he always found Canada a place to be ashamed of.

    You really don’t miss the water till the well runs dry, do you?

  15. What a delectable bit in His Lardship’s latest column in the Nazional Post (about Eddie Genson):

    “He is the archetypal small-office criminal lawyer, in a pre-First World War building, rarely having ever represented an innocent, or even a respectable client.”

    Well, he sure didn’t stray from form when he represented the crook CB, who is neither innocent nor respectable.

  16. Conrad Black is a successful business man. Keeping him locked up is a waste of taxpayer’s money and deprives society of an important business resource. America needs his genius now. Let him go!

  17. After reading all the stories on the death of J.Pelletier today, I wonder Steve if you or anyone else wants to make the same case for Chuck Guite?

    The crux of your arguement is: “If the goal of the justice system is to identify the guilty, to punish, deter and produce contributing members of society, then the prosecution of Conrad Black has achieved all it can.

    It seems quite likely that these points likely apply as much to Guite as they do to Black: 1) deterrence being ineffective in high stakes crime is as applicable here likely as it is in the private sector; 2) rehabilitation is an non-issue as he will never get the change to pull the same criminal activity again.; 3) his reputation and career are shredded; 3) Guite’s personal life has been subject to scorn and ridicule.

    And I beleive CG has served a greater proportion of his sentence than Sir Black. Should we set Chuck free? Isn’t keeping him locked up just vindictive? If no, why not?

    Supporters of Black and haters of the Liberal Party will jump all over this with ‘Chuck was worse!’. They are perhaps factually accurate, but they are ad hominem here. Although Steve allows that there are some crimes that are worse then others, severity of the crime barely enters into Steve’s arguments for keeping CB’s release. Those arguments are concentrated as discussed above about what the justice system has/could achieve via incarceration and the issue of vindictiveness.

  18. Hmm, the “reply” thing ain’t workin’, I see. Perhaps there are too many posts in the moderation queue.

  19. Am i the only one who finds CB’s prose a little turgid. I know i don’t have to read him and rarely do, although in fairness his take does occasionally surprise me. But that prose, the self regard. Sorta like Churchill but with none of the wit that makes the great man still readable. just in case you’re reading Conrad;” the great man”, it’s no you.

  20. If every CEO on wall street is not guilty, then neither is Conrad Black. Obviously the rules don’t apply to everyone. You bunch of hypocrites. And yes he is Canadian and we want him back. And I would say he could start another business as long as he follows the rules, after all he has the same amount of honesty and integrity as the rest. It’s just too bad he was the only one to go to jail, it is obvious he had a lot of help in the business community and they should all be with him.

    • And yes he is Canadian and we want him back.

      Speak for yourself.

      I actually don’t care where he ends up living, just so long as he serves out a decent portion of his sentence like any other felon.

    • Sylvia:

      “Obviously the rules don’t apply to everyone. ”

      Actually, Sylvia, they do, at least in a state governed under the rule of law. There are some, like His Lardship, who don’t believe that, and act accordingly. Not all are caught, and he got away with a lot of things for a long time, sailing very close to the wind, but then the karma avalanche began and he veered across the line, the other players cried “foul” and the referee gave him his walking papers.

      The fact that others get away with worse crimes does not justify ignoring his or failing to punish him.

      Would you argue that someone who is caught stealing $10,000 in Toronto should not be punished just because there are x number of unsolved murders, rapes and other serious crimes in the city?

      Some criminals get caught, others don’t. That’s the way the cookie crumbles!

      Your assertion that everyone on Wall Street and in business generally is crooked does a great injustice to the many members of the business community, almost certainly the majority, who act in accordance with the law and ethically, and who do not allow their greed to blind them to their obligations to society.

      • Fintan
        See this from CB’s pov. He trades in his citizenship for a Lordship. Surely it’s reasonable to assume when he entered that courtroom that his lordship, trumped her honourship. What’s the pt of poncing around in all that rediculous HOL’s finery if it doesn’t doesn’t privelege you above the hoi ploi [sp] ?

        • Right, kc, the fool obviously thinks a life peerage makes someone into the next best thing to immortal. The whole thing is so phoney, even the “ermine” in the robes, which is actually bleached rabbit!

          By the way, fate does not treat Lords with a colour in their name very kindly. Last year saw Lord Black sent to the hoosegow, Lord Brown booted out of the top job in BP because of a dalliance with a Canadian rentboy and the complications thereof, whilst the late Lord White was involved in a scandal a few years ago over beating up his decades-younger trophy wife.

          The really sad thing about His Lardship is that he probably believes he has something to contribute to British society, whereas most of the British people he knew drank his and Morticia’s fine wines (I would have too, given the chance) but sniggered behind their backs at the antics of what they saw as gauche, social mountaineering bombastic colonial hicks.

          That he thought his peerage cut any ice with the judge in a US courtroom is just another example of how detached from reality the poor fool is, and how badly in need of a comeuppance he was.

          P.S. Excuse the mixed sporting metaphor in my last post. I’m getting as bad as His Lardship. LOL

          • Well it did get him his own batman. “You live by the lord, you die by the lord.”[couldn’t resist, there goes my peerage]

    • This is a joke, right, Syliva? You say, “Obviously the rules don’t apply to everyone.” as if that is a good thing, or as if being rich and powerful is SUPPOSED to make you above the law.

      But of course it is a joke. “He is Canadian and we want him back.” Hahaha! Good one!

  21. Fintan: ““What will Black write before he dies?” asks James Short. Unashamed and unrepentant scoundrel that he is, probably something like “Non, je ne regrette rien””

    Ahem.

    Non, rien de rien
    Non, je ne regrette rien
    Ni l’argent que j’ai pris, ni ma femme
    Tout ça dont on me blâme!

    Non, rien de rien
    Non, je ne regrette rien
    Humilié, incarcéré, blasphémé
    Je serai bien disculpé!

    Avec mes adjectifs
    J’ai gâté l’égoisme
    Prétentieux gérondifs
    Mésurés dans l’abîme
    Mésurées les amendes
    C’est adieu aux limos
    Au revoir les chauffeurs
    Je repars à vélo

    Non, rien de rien
    Non, je ne regrette rien
    Ni l’argent que j’ai pris, ni ma femme
    Tout ça dont on me blâme!

    Non, rien de rien
    Non, je ne regrette rien
    Car vos vies, car vos joies
    Aujourd’hui recommencent avec moi!

    • Heh.

    • Jack, my French is terrible, but I get the gist. ROFLMAO

    • CB is a little large to be a little sparrow…

    • It was inspired. Jack, are you a native French speaker?

    • Thanks, guys! It would certainly sound great in Milord’s baritone, eh? And, no, Ti-Guy, I’m anglophone, but I lived for a good while in Montreal (ah, blissful days!) and have been trying to read more French poetry lately. Very flattering question, though, thanks!

      • Can i have a translation? Not the same i’m sure.

        • Original

          No, nothing at all
          No, I regret nothing
          Neither the good they’ve done for me, nor the bad
          It’s all the same to me

          No, nothing at all
          No, I regret nothing
          It’s paid for, swept away, forgotten
          I’m through with the past

          With my memories
          I’ve started fires
          My frustrations, my pleasures
          I don’t need them any more
          Swept away are my loves
          With their quaverings
          Swept away for ever
          I’m starting from scratch

          No, nothing at all
          No, I regret nothing
          Neither the good they’ve done for me, nor the bad
          It’s all the same to me

          No, nothing at all
          No, I regret nothing
          Since my life and my joy
          Begins today with you

          Crossharbour version

          No, nothing at all
          No, I regret nothing
          Neither the money that I took, nor my wife
          Everything they blame me for!

          No, nothing at all
          No, I regret nothing
          Humiliated, incarcerated, blasphemed
          I will be well vindicated!

          With my adjectives
          I indulged in egoism
          Pretentious gerunds
          Measured in the abyss
          When the fines are measured
          It’s good-bye to the limos
          See you later, drivers
          I’m heading off on a bicycle

          No, nothing at all
          No, I regret nothing
          Neither the money that I took, nor my wife
          Everything they blame me for!

          No, nothing at all
          No, I regret nothing
          For your lives and your joys
          Begin again today with me!

  22. HEY, HEY, HEY hear your Mr. Madoff (or is that Lord Madoff) the American who stole over 50 billion from
    American investors isn’t going to jail, he gets to stay in his penthouse( oh boy oh boy) is that because he’s American???? Where as Black was taking money from his own company. Get it yet. And yes in Canada we do believe there is a difference, we have a prison for white collar crimes. Maybe you ought to practice what you preach. No special treatment here, yeah right. And how about that Martha Stewart, gets out of jail and goes right back to work. Well if that don’t beat all.

  23. Good discussion, but some points are mute, Under the guidelines for Presidential pardon, Lord Black is not eligable.

    Who Can Apply for a Pardon.

    No petition for pardon should be filed until the expiration of a waiting period of at least five years subsequent to the date of the release of the petitioner from confinement or, in case no prison sentence was imposed, until the expiration of a period of at least five years subsequent to the date of the conviction of the petitioner.

    In some cases, such as those involving violent crimes, violation of narcotics laws, gun control laws, income tax laws, perjury, violation of public trust involving substantial sums of money, violations involving organized crime, or other crimes of a serious nature, no petition should be filed until the expiration of a waiting period of seven years.

    The waiting period may be waived in cases of aliens seeking a pardon to avert deportation.

    Generally, no petition should be submitted by a person who is on probation or parole.

    Offenses against the laws of possessions or territories of the United States.

    Applications for pardons shall relate only to violations of laws of the United States. Applications relating to violations of laws of the possessions of the United States or territories subject to the jurisdiction thereof should be submitted to the appropriate official or agency of the possession or territory concerned.

    For those who wish to help the Lord Black, the instructions for submitting a pardon request can be found at – http://www.silicon-valley.com/pardonme/index.shtml.

    Fair Winds,
    PB Lovin-

  24. President Bush pardoned a turkey last Thanksgiving. Enough already.

  25. A child rapist gets 2-4 years, out in much less, and no one really cares. No one gets angry or screams that he should remain in jail for the full sentenct. Yet, many lives have been permanently destroyed. Conrad should never have spent a day in jail. That does not mean he did not do questionable things, but who does it help to have him behind bars? Waste of American tax payers money (maybe this is why so many Canadians are gleeful?) Meanwhile “Maddog” is living in his penthouse, while people whose lives he destroyed (some have committed suicide). American justice, what a joke… Here is hoping some sanity prevails and Conrad is let go…

  26. This comment was deleted.

    • Actually, Steve I think you’d make a fabulous criminal defence lawyer. Sean on the other hand…
      Maybe you should do your homework, studies have shown for as long as I can remember that incarceration doesnt really acheive the objective of detterence ( specific or general), it does more to satisy the anger of people like you….so let’s be honest about why you want to keep Black locked up.

  27. Radler is a rodent….and rodents don’t “come clean” as one blogger suggested but rather smell an opportunity which he wisely did. Although I don’t have a lot of sympathy for Connie, I think that the US judicial system is a farce and even more pitiful than the Canadian system…. which is nothing to be proud of.. No level playing field there. Just another witch burning akin to Martha. We all kinda envy the wealthy. Too bad for Connie that the jurors weren’t actual “peers”.

  28. What is with the Canadian gov’t shooting down Connie’s request to have his Canadian citizenship back? Is this typical? Or are they being ‘hands off’ because of his incarceration? Or is he being punished for having snubbed his Cdn roots? Does anyone know?

  29. A lot of people are impressed by his education and intellect, not me. I know a lot of very smart people working in all waks of life that aren't as self-serving and greedy as this man is. There are two tendancies in humans, to be selfish or to be altruistic. As far as I'm concerned, Mr. Black has a lot of catching up to do in the 'working for others' department …

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  30. Black was found guilty of three counts of fraud and one count of obstruction of justice after a four-month trial. The U.S. Court of Appeals in Chicago granted Black's petition for bail last month while it considers his appeal, following a U.S. Supreme Court decision in June.

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