Scientists discover genetic signature of longevity - Macleans.ca
 

Scientists discover genetic signature of longevity

150 unique genetic variations can predict a long life past 100


 

Scientists from Boston University say they have found the genetic signature of longevity. After analyzing the genes of the world’s oldest people (1,000 who lived over 100) the scientists say that they have found variations in the genes that contribute to a longer life. Though the trait is complex, scientists hope that they will be able to predict an individuals inclination to a longer life. For example, a gene called FOX03A can triple the changes of a person living past 100. In total the study found that there were 150 unique genetic variations that, when put together, boost a chance of fighting off the wear and tear of age.

Wall Street Journal


 
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Scientists discover genetic signature of longevity

  1. Hilarious. It's not science at all. They can tell if people have the "genetic signature" if the person is under 5'4".

  2. With all due regard to the little guy above… this is quite a big deal in the long term. While the short term result will be a flurry of people interested in getting their personal genome done, over the longer term it provides a roadmap of where (and in who) to look for clues about significantly accelerating the extention of the human lifespan.