Do the DEET - Macleans.ca
 

Do the DEET

Still considered the “gold standard” of insect repellents


 

Despite recent debate about the health risks associated with DEET-based bug repellents, recent articles encourage its use. In its April issue, the Journal of Travel Medicine stated that DEET is the “gold standard” of repellents and a “key strategy” in fighting bites from mosquitoes, ticks and anthropods. The July issue of Consumer Reports includes four DEET-based repellents in its top six choices of bug sprays (picaridin and oil of lemon eucalyptus round out the list). Even the American Academy of Pediatrics has approved the use of repellents containing 30 per cent DEET for children as young as two months old.

Newswise


 
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Do the DEET

  1. i would rather try the lemon eucalyptus stuff which has no health effects

  2. You mean "arthropods", not "anthropods". Anthropods are bipedal humanoids (i.e. us) and unfortunately DEET is useless in repelling humans; believe me, I've tried wearing the stuff to cocktail parties more than once. DEET, however, does work on arthropods, which are creepy crawly biting things with exoskeletons.

  3. i don't think people would go near you if you smelled like DEET, that stuff stinks something like pine and gasoline