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Egyptian government officials join anti-Mubarak protests

Demonstrators gather in Cairo for “Friday of departure”


 

With no sign of the government supporters who clashed with protesters in Cairo two days ago, hundreds of thousands of people gathered in Tahrir square for an eleventh straight day of demonstrations against Hosni Mubarak’s government. Several government officials, including Amr Moussa, secretary general of the Arab League and a former foreign minister, and Mohamed Rafah Tahtawy, spokesman for Egypt’s highest state-run religious authority, appear to have aligned themselves with the protesters. The military has begun to gain some control over the chaos of the previous days. The government has also said it is open to negotiations with the outlawed Muslim Brotherhood, who in turn said they would not be presenting a candidate for the next election in September. “It is not a retreat,” said Mohammed el-Beltagui, a leading spokesman for the Brotherhood, said, “it is to take away the scare tactics that Hosni Mubarak uses to deceive the people here and abroad that he should stay in power.”

New York Times


 
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Egyptian government officials join anti-Mubarak protests

  1. Here is one of the biggest economic issues facing Egypt now, and in the future, with or without President Mubarak:

    http://viableopposition.blogspot.com/2011/02/egyp

    With young, highly educated Egyptians facing unemployment rates approaching 20 percent (and far higher if they are young females), it is no wonder they are disaffected with the current political state of the country. I suspect young people living in Western countries would feel no different if they were responsible for 90 percent of their county's unemployed.

  2. Here is one of the biggest economic issues facing Egypt now, and in the future, with or without President Mubarak:

    http://viableopposition.blogspot.com/2011/02/egyp

    With young, highly educated Egyptians facing unemployment rates approaching 20 percent (and far higher if they are young females), it is no wonder they are disaffected with the current political state of the country. I suspect young people living in Western countries would feel no different if they were responsible for 90 percent of their county's unemployed.

  3. Mubarak needs to be involved in a road side boomb. He has hurt his people so damn bad he should be put to death. He is worth 70 billion dollars and half of his people live on $4.00 per day. The people of Egypt should end him with in the hour.

  4. Mubarak needs to be involved in a road side boomb. He has hurt his people so damn bad he should be put to death. He is worth 70 billion dollars and half of his people live on $4.00 per day. The people of Egypt should end him with in the hour.

  5. The only side fearing Mubarak's fall is Israel. The reason is clear, Mubarak is their strongest ally in the region, and they have been counting on dictators in the region to keep the anti-Israel masses capped. The giant is out of the bottle, and will not go back. Israel has too much time to reach peace with the Palestinians and other Arabs, but they failed to grasp the opportunity. Now, they will pay so much for their atrocities committed with endorsement of these regimes.

  6. The only side fearing Mubarak's fall is Israel. The reason is clear, Mubarak is their strongest ally in the region, and they have been counting on dictators in the region to keep the anti-Israel masses capped. The giant is out of the bottle, and will not go back. Israel has too much time to reach peace with the Palestinians and other Arabs, but they failed to grasp the opportunity. Now, they will pay so much for their atrocities committed with endorsement of these regimes.

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