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Fighting intensifies in Libya despite air strikes

Pro-Gadhafi assault on Misrata resumes after coalition bombing


 

Pro-Gadhafi forces have resumed their assault on Misrata, Libya’s third largest city, after being temporarily driven back by coalition aerial bombings on Thursday. Four Canadian CF-18 fighter jets were involved in the aerial assault that bombarded Libyan armed forces in an attempt to stop pro-Gadhafi forces from attacking civilians. While the bombardments were initially successful, government forces soon regrouped and resumed their weeklong assault on Misrata, where an estimated 1,000 people were either wounded or simply taking shelter in the central hospital with no electricity. A spokesman for the National Council, the main opposition group, told reporters that government forces have been “targeting civilians and ambulances trying to enter the hospital from snipers on rooftops.” Meanwhile, Canadian Maj.-Gen. Tom Lawson, the deputy chief of air staff, told reporters at a briefing in Ottawa that Canada’s first bombing run since Kosovo succeeded in destroying an ammunition depot in Misrata, and that the attack “was very successful and their was no collateral damage.”

Toronto Star


 
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Fighting intensifies in Libya despite air strikes

  1. The suggestion was that the "West" would "level the field" by creating a no-fly zone. We were in fact taking sides in an internal civil dispute. Now that the no-fly zone has been established any further bombing is making our real motives clear. We are attempting to tip the "field" in favour of the rebels. We had no business being there in the first place and we should now bow out and let the Libyans determine their future.

  2. Your comment seems spot-on and in agreement with many others. Both sides are engaged in military operations whether or not they are wearing military uniforms. A case could be made for R2P but then a case could be made for just about any policy of engagement. What would make sense is if interference in this Libyan war was truly and obviously in Western interests.

  3. Your comment seems spot-on and in agreement with many others. Both sides are engaged in military operations whether or not they are wearing military uniforms. A case could be made for R2P but then a case could be made for just about any policy of engagement. What would make sense is if interference in this Libyan war was truly and obviously in Western interests.

  4. Oil

  5. Oil

  6. In the name of freedom, democracy and oil is the justification for this 'solidarity' amongst all nations against Khaddafi. Interesting…..Khaddafi must go but why are these humanitarian values not upheld for the Palestinians being killed by Israels and isolated in refugee camps for so long? Why no concern for the innocents being killed by the drone attacks in Pakistan? And other parts of Africa…well lets just forget about that area, nothing of value for the 'developed' world…until of course some great resource finds are made public.

  7. In the name of freedom, democracy and oil is the justification for this 'solidarity' amongst all nations against Khaddafi. Interesting…..Khaddafi must go but why are these humanitarian values not upheld for the Palestinians being killed by Israels and isolated in refugee camps for so long? Why no concern for the innocents being killed by the drone attacks in Pakistan? And other parts of Africa…well lets just forget about that area, nothing of value for the 'developed' world…until of course some great resource finds are made public.

    • KIR: Seems to me that the operations you mention are in support of humanity to interdict those who behave like savages.

  8. KIR: Seems to me that the operations you mention are in support of humanity to interdict those who behave like savages.

  9. By ousting Qaddafi, west is going to create a dozen more mini Qaddafis. Next stage would be the oil companies competing with each other for the resources using the local rivalries. West is in fact, compounding the existing problem

  10. By ousting Qaddafi, west is going to create a dozen more mini Qaddafis. Next stage would be the oil companies competing with each other for the resources using the local rivalries. West is in fact, compounding the existing problem

  11. This is a war where both parties (Gadaffi & the opposition) are extremely undesirables. The leader at the front for the opposition party is an Al-Queda fighter, sympathizer, and supporter. He also admitted that most of those who are at the front lines fighting the government are Al-Queda fighters. Are we embroiled on another Afghanistan (part II), where we helped and armed those who wish to destroy us? Read this shocking interview done by Telegraph UK:
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaa

    We should not interfere in any middle eastern/Islamic countries shout for military intervention. Let them solve problems of their own making. No matter what help is being given; they will still turn their backs on us and shout "Death to Infidels". Look at Egypt; it's turning to become the next Iran/Pakistan after their so called unfinished "revolution" – with the Muslim Brotherhood at the front and Egyptian army as enforcers. Tunisia, the Islamists are gaining grounds and clout to the dismay of their women and minorities. I could not see any difference in Libya, Syria and elsewhere. Ordinary citizens of these countries need to grow a brain before meaningful changes could take place. Until they realize that it's their interpretation of religion that suppresses and oppresses them, it will be business as usual if not worse, only with different faces at the front

  12. This is a war where both parties (Gadaffi & the opposition) are extremely undesirables. The leader at the front for the opposition party is an Al-Queda fighter, sympathizer, and supporter. He also admitted that most of those who are at the front lines fighting the government are Al-Queda fighters. Are we embroiled on another Afghanistan (part II), where we helped and armed those who wish to destroy us? Read this shocking interview done by Telegraph UK:
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaa

    We should not interfere in any middle eastern/Islamic countries shout for military intervention. Let them solve problems of their own making. No matter what help is being given; they will still turn their backs on us and shout "Death to Infidels". Look at Egypt; it's turning to become the next Iran/Pakistan after their so called unfinished "revolution" – with the Muslim Brotherhood at the front and Egyptian army as enforcers. Tunisia, the Islamists are gaining grounds and clout to the dismay of their women and minorities. I could not see any difference in Libya, Syria and elsewhere. Ordinary citizens of these countries need to grow a brain before meaningful changes could take place. Until they realize that it's their interpretation of religion that suppresses and oppresses them, it will be business as usual if not worse, only with different faces at the front

  13. Political analysts say that protecting civilians in Libya is actually the allied coalition's secondary priority. The primary one is eliminating the country's defenses and gaining control over Libya's oil-rich regions through civil war between tribes.
    The West needs oil and all means to obtain same are good.
    Here is a bit of history not taught in Western schools because it would be inconvenient and interfere with obtaining popular support for invasions and regime change.
    World War II was in essence a contest for fossil fuel. An energy-hungry Japan invaded China for its coal and Indonesia for oil reserves. Nazi Germany's blitzkriegs were aimed at oil fields in Romania, Libya and the Caspian Sea region. The United States and Britain fought the Axis Powers to retain their control over the world's fossil fuel, and they're still doing the same in conflicts with OPEC nations and to control Central Asia and East Asia's continental shelf.

  14. Political analysts say that protecting civilians in Libya is actually the allied coalition's secondary priority. The primary one is eliminating the country's defenses and gaining control over Libya's oil-rich regions through civil war between tribes.
    The West needs oil and all means to obtain same are good.
    Here is a bit of history not taught in Western schools because it would be inconvenient and interfere with obtaining popular support for invasions and regime change.
    World War II was in essence a contest for fossil fuel. An energy-hungry Japan invaded China for its coal and Indonesia for oil reserves. Nazi Germany's blitzkriegs were aimed at oil fields in Romania, Libya and the Caspian Sea region. The United States and Britain fought the Axis Powers to retain their control over the world's fossil fuel, and they're still doing the same in conflicts with OPEC nations and to control Central Asia and East Asia's continental shelf.

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