First Nations University loses funding - Macleans.ca
 

First Nations University loses funding

Misspending, bad governance cited as reasons for redirecting funds


 

First Nations University of Canada will lose millions of dollars in federal funding as of April 1, but that funding will be redirected to help First Nations students elsewhere, says Indian Affairs and Northern Development Minister Chuck Strahl. The Saskatchewan government announced last week that it will also stop its annual funding of $5.2 million to the university. Citing serious problems related to governance and finances, Strahl said, “Finally, we had to take the step that we did, which is to decide to focus on student needs and look after the students in the shorter term … and then reinvest that money we had budgeted for the First Nations University to make sure it does a better job of meeting the needs of First Nations students.” Last year, Indian Affairs gave the university a $7.2 million operating grant.

CBC News


 
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First Nations University loses funding

  1. Most of those following this fiasco are saying "it's about time!" This institution has put its true purpose of education for students second (or lower) on the totem pole of priorities. It is about time that everyone breathed a sigh of relief that this has come to a head finally and express hope that aboriginal students can be educated at the same facilities as the rest of the population which seem to serve us quite well. My experience as a person who has been entrusted to hire many people for entry level positions is that aboriginal run schools are far behind the mainstream schools. Aboriginal students with grade 10, 11 or 12 transcripts are in fact no where near that level in actuallity. It is a shame that companies are forced to hire student who are less qualified that the rest just to meet quotas when the answer is to give aboriginal students a true education and let them enter the workforce as equals and with dignity,

    • pretty hard to succeed in a system meant for non-natives

  2. If natives were truly concerned about the education of their future generations they would insist on this rather than continue to foster the educational divide between their children and the rest of the population. If aboriginal studies were offered as optional courses in mainstream school curriculums so much the better but our future workforce needs the education that will allow them to be successful and prosper.

  3. in laymans terms there is an explanation…corruption and greed exists…its like this…okay,mr government the land was taken and its natural resources now its our turn… we are going to take the money you give us because basically the mob mentality rules…(peer pressure among employees…top down!)… and ….reservations are outdated political prisons meant to imprison the original peoples while plundering continued in the early 1800s….fine, but now 200 years later the 'indian act' or 'act indian' has to change …it is not working…another tool has to be devised if they desire to exist under the regime of parliamentary legislation ….liberation is a state of mind as such is imprisonment…. this explanation is intended to educate…presently am working on a book and a movie, investors are welcome…

  4. Seems like a double standard – run the only Aboriginal University in the country badly we cut your funding.

    Run your foreign-owned automobile company badly FOR DECADES and you will just need a bigger shovel for all the funding we give you.

    At least the university had the chance of improving the lives of young Canadians who frankly don't get the same breaks as the rest of us.

    I don't believe the same can be said for any GM product.

  5. It's about time! This scenario has played out far too many times in this country!

  6. That's a huge money to spend for a certain project though.