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First Tunisia, then Egypt, and now Yemen

Thousands gather to protest Yemeni government


 

Yemen is now the latest Arab state to see mass protests in its cities’ streets. On Thursday, led by opposition groups, at least 10,000 people gathered in the streets of Sana, Yemen to protest the government. In contrast to the violent demonstrations in Tunis and Cairo, the march in Sana was relatively peaceful, with carefully organized opposition factions marching in color-coordinated groups. The government reportedly dispatched a large number of security forces into the capital’s streets, while publicly denying it did so. Protestors are calling for the removal of President Ali Abdallah Saleh, who has ruled a divided Yemen for more than 30 years and is a key ally of the U.S. in the war on terror. He responded to the unrest by raising salaries for the army. Yemen is one of the poorest countries in the world and is rocked by regional divisions and active al-Qaeda elements throughout the country.

New York Times


 
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First Tunisia, then Egypt, and now Yemen

  1. While western countries with diplomatic postings in the Middle East are dazed and confused, they wouldn't be, if they had a greater awareness of history. In 1848, all the capitals of Europe were filled with protestors calling for an end to absolute monarchy and constitutional government. Most of the European countries ended up with absolute monarchy and no constitution when New Year's Day rolled around in 1849, but change eventually came to those countries, with varying degrees of pain and trauma. In the meantime, the West had better not get too attached to Arab leaders like King Mohammed VI in Morocco, or the FLN in Algeria, because their time is going to come. But not to worry: with online banking, the likes of Hosni Mubarak and Ali Abdullah Saleh can route money from their countries' treasuries into banks in Switzerland.

  2. While western countries with diplomatic postings in the Middle East are dazed and confused, they wouldn't be, if they had a greater awareness of history. In 1848, all the capitals of Europe were filled with protestors calling for an end to absolute monarchy and constitutional government. Most of the European countries ended up with absolute monarchy and no constitution when New Year's Day rolled around in 1849, but change eventually came to those countries, with varying degrees of pain and trauma. In the meantime, the West had better not get too attached to Arab leaders like King Mohammed VI in Morocco, or the FLN in Algeria, because their time is going to come. But not to worry: with online banking, the likes of Hosni Mubarak and Ali Abdullah Saleh can route money from their countries' treasuries into banks in Switzerland.

  3. It's all Bush's fault. (This time I'm serious.)

  4. It's all Bush's fault. (This time I'm serious.)

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