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Former ECB official likely to lead Greece

New PM will head national-unity government


 

Lucas Papademos, a former deputy head of the European Central Bank, emerged on Monday as the most likely candidate to replace current Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou. A non-political figure with a strong technical background in economic affairs would lead a new government of national unity until the country heads to the polls, Papandreou and the conservative opposition agreed on Sunday. Greek leaders are now expected to choose on a new prime minister on Monday. However, former conservative finance minister Stefanos Manos told Reuters that “the new prime minister will … not give the impression that he is in charge. Everyone will be looking to the two party leaders who will be running things behind the scenes.” He added: “The civil service won’t implement any decision and everyone will be waiting for the election.”

Reuters


 
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Former ECB official likely to lead Greece

  1. Great, so a bankster gets the top Greek position? So much for representing the will of the people. Where are the rioters and strikers when you need them the most? The Greek people should already be up in arms after Papandreou ripped the referendum away from them, and now to add salt to the wound they place a puppet of the banks in his stead.

    • Do they want to fix the situation or not?
       
      Rioting and voting certainly won’t.

      •  

        In a decision this important it should be up to
        the Greek people to take full responsibility for their own actions.
        They will have no choice in the matter if a servant of the banks
        takes over the rule of law, because bankers only cure one issue and
        they only cure it for themselves. If this banker attempts to whip the
        citizens into fiscal servitude for the next ten or twenty years then
        future riots will be much worse than anything you have seen to-date.
        Democracy at this point in time is of the utmost importance and it is
        impossible for me to believe that any person living in a democratic
        country could possibly feel otherwise. If the Greek people are
        allowed to vote and do actually take the bailouts then they will have
        to live with the consequences. If they vote not to take the bailouts
        then they must live with the consequences also. They are making a
        huge mistake not involving the citizens on any level because when the
        bankers austerity hits full force their government will rue the day
        that they missed this opportunity to be “of, by, and for the
        people”.

        • This is an emergency situation, and they don’t have time for election campaigns….so leaders will have to do the job they were already elected to do,  and make the tough moves themselves.

          It’s not like there are any other options anyway at this point.

          • The elected leaders are being pushed out, and a
            defacto ex-ECB banker is being promoted as a replacement. To what
            campaigns are you referring?The Greek court passed a law allowing
            referendum votes of national importance over a month ago. The
            decision the people should be allowed to make right now does not
            involve campaigning by parties, just a one question vote to convey
            the will of the people.
            The Greek court passed a law allowing
            referendum votes of national importance over a month ago. The
            decision the people should be allowed to make right now does not
            involve campaigning by parties, just a one question vote to convey
            the will of the people.

          • Papandreou was elected in 2009, and it’s his job to do. He even got a vote of confidence….but he chose to voluntarily step aside for a ‘national’ or ‘coalition’ govt. In other words he’s dumping the hard decisions on someone else.

            As to asking the people….the only thing they can ask them is if they want to be in or out of the Euro. Polls show most Greeks wish to remain in the EU rather than going back to the drachma.

            The EU will hurt less than the drachma, but there’s going to be pain either way.

            Maybe they’ll eventually learn to pay their taxes.

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