Former MI5 chief blasts Iraq invasion - Macleans.ca
 

Former MI5 chief blasts Iraq invasion

Refutes 9/11 – Hussein link and says invasion radicalized a generation of Muslims


 

Eliza Manningham-Buller, director of the MI5 between 2002 and 2007, gave a damning testimony in the UK Chilcot Inquiry (also known as the Iraq Inquiry, an ongoing public inquiry into the UK’s role in the 2003 Iraq invasion). The former spy chief said that the attack increased the terrorist threat to Britain by radicalizing a generation of Muslims. Manningham-Buller also said the focus on Iraq detracted from efforts in Afghanistan to quell al-Queda and that resources became stretched too thin. “Arguably we gave Osama bin Laden his Iraqi jihad, so that he was able to move into Iraq in a way that he was not before,” she said.

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Former MI5 chief blasts Iraq invasion

  1. Radicalized a generation of Muslims? As head of MI5, she was in charge of UK internal security. Had she never visited "Londonistan" with someone who could translate for her? British Muslims were already radicals. However, they refrained from attacking inside Britain.

    What she really means is that the invasion of Iraq ended the tacit agreement between the Crown and radicals about terrorism inside the UK.

    • No I have a funny feeling she meant what she said, she is a bright woman who probably knows where the skeletons are buried.
      The second gulf war was founded on lies. Blair and Bush knew they were lieing but invaded anyway. Al Qaeda were given the chance they needed to avoid total destruction. And all the radical clerics all over the world were given the ammunition they needed to create a lasting hatred amongst their young.
      Yes I lived amongst immigrant populations in London for a fair while in the 80s. They were great folk with a sense of community and included me in this community. It is the stupidity of people who only look to the short term that has allowed radicals to drive a wedge between parents and their kids.
      Phillips book was terrible, the fact that you quote its title indicates the level to which you know how those streets operated then and work today.

  2. She's absolutely right.