Government shutdown looms as U.S. budget talks enter final minutes

Issue of federal funding for abortion hindering bi-partisan compromise

Budget talks in the U.S. enter their final minutes on Friday as a government shutdown deadline approaches, with Democrats and Republicans unable to come to a compromise over federal spending cuts, particularly in the area of women’s health. Democratic Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid said that while both sides had agreed to $38-billion in spending cuts, they were unable to come to a consensus on federal funding for abortion. “This has been a moving target but now we’ve come to realize that the moving target is now focused on a bull’s eye on women in America,” said Reid. Republicans, led by House Speaker John Boehner, have been pressured by the conservative Tea Party movement to secure at least $60-billion in spending cuts, but Democrats, who initially accepted only $33-billion in cuts, say the amount demanded by the Republicans would hinder U.S. economic growth. Should talks stall and the government shut down, 800,000 government employees, including U.S. troops, would have their pay suspended. The last government shutdown happened in 1995, when the Republican Congress led by Newt Gingrich, in a dispute with President Bill Clinton, forced a 20-day shutdown.

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Government shutdown looms as U.S. budget talks enter final minutes

  1. *ahem* The headline says that the disagreement is about federal funding for abortion. In fact, none of the money goes to fund abortion. Not. A. Single. Penny. Rather, it goes to a large number community health clinics that provide general health services to low income people. One of those many providers – Planned Parenthood – gets about 25% of the total funds involved, with the other 75% going to other providers. In turn, Planned Parenthood spends 3% of its overall budget on abortion services; again, however, the funding for abortions is completely separate from the funding in question here, which is for low-income people's general medical needs.

    Got it now?

  2. *ahem* The headline says that the disagreement is about federal funding for abortion. In fact, none of the money goes to fund abortion. Not. A. Single. Penny. Rather, it goes to a large number community health clinics that provide general health services to low income people. One of those many providers – Planned Parenthood – gets about 25% of the total funds involved, with the other 75% going to other providers. In turn, Planned Parenthood spends 3% of its overall budget on abortion services; again, however, the funding for abortions is completely separate from the funding in question here, which is for low-income people's general medical needs.

    Got it now?

  3. Here's an article that examines what might trigger a debt crisis in the United States and when that could occur:

    http://viableopposition.blogspot.com/2011/04/trig

    Let's hope that Congress takes swift and severe action. So far, the proposed cuts are a tiny fraction of what is needed to reach balance over the coming decades as unfunded entitlement program expenses rise.

  4. Here's an article that examines what might trigger a debt crisis in the United States and when that could occur:

    http://viableopposition.blogspot.com/2011/04/trig

    Let's hope that Congress takes swift and severe action. So far, the proposed cuts are a tiny fraction of what is needed to reach balance over the coming decades as unfunded entitlement program expenses rise.

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