Hand over gun registry data, Quebec Superior Court tells Ottawa

MONTREAL – Quebec has won the latest stage in its legal battle against the federal government to keep long-gun registry data for the province.

MONTREAL – Quebec has won the latest stage in its legal battle against the federal government to keep long-gun registry data for the province.

Justice Marc-Andre Blanchard of the Quebec Superior Court sided with the province and ordered the federal government to hand over the information.

It’s just one more step in the battle over what to do with the remnants of the now-defunct federal gun registry — a fight that could end up before the Supreme Court of Canada.

Today’s decision comes after the province obtained a series of temporary injunctions safeguarding the Quebec data. That meant long-guns continue to be registered in this province, a process that has ended elsewhere in the country.

The bill to end the federal long-gun registry received royal assent on April 5, fulfilling a longstanding promise by the Harper government to decriminalize non-registration of long guns.

In Quebec, where there is a strong current of support for gun control, the provincial government has sought information from the registry and it plans to start its own provincial long-gun registry with data from that province.

Quebec argues that it has a right to the information because its taxpayers helped build and pay for it.

The Harper government is opposed to relinquishing any data, which it is determined to destroy. It says Quebec can start from scratch if it wants to build its own registry.




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Hand over gun registry data, Quebec Superior Court tells Ottawa

  1. A Quebec judge siding with Quebec on a matter that a) was democratically
    decided in Canada, and b) is 100% federal matter, as decided by the
    Supreme Court of Canada during the Bill C-68 debates. (re: Alberta
    wanting to opt out).

    Plus, thousands of guns have changed hands
    legally since the registry was scrapped. The data was useless and
    incomplete to begin with, now it’s worse.

    Simply put, this is judicial grandstanding from our whiniest province.

    • Simply put, this is one poster who has no idea how the judicial system works!

      • How so, Oliver?

    • OK, I get that you are opposed to the gun registry. Your side won. But the people of Quebec feel differently – as is their right. They are requesting only the data pertinent to their province. They paid for that data with their (federal) taxes. Even if – or especially if – it is useless, as you claim, what’s the big deal about giving it to them?

      Other, that is, than the childish desire to piss on one’s opponents?

      • Keith, the gun registry falls under the Criminal Code of Canada, and failure to register a gun is a CC offence punishable by jail time. The anti-gun gang wanted it that way when C-68 was enacted. Alberta wanted to opt out of the registry, but the Supreme Court ruled that since the law was part of the CC, the jurisdiction fell to the federal government, not the provinces. (Provinces have no CC, only civil codes). So, if the gun registry data was ruled to be federal when AB wanted to opt out, it follows that it’s federal now, not Quebec’s or any other province’s.

        • Provices may enact quasi-criminal offences (often known as “provincial offences”) which can be punished by jail time of up to two years less a day.

          You’re welcome.

    • Did you know that Harper appointed this judge?

  2. One word for Quebec re it’s dictates to Canada-UP !!!!!

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