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Heath at the Walrus


 

Don’t tell Wells, but the Walrus has a pleasantly long interview with Joe Heath that’s worth checking out.  You’ll get more out of it if you’ve read Filthy Lucre already; they talk mostly about the relationship between the left and economic thought.


 
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Heath at the Walrus

  1. they talk mostly about the relationship between the left and economic thought.

    No they don't. They mostly drag out tired old canards about the left and economic thought.

    • I was wondering… since you're right all the time why hasn't MacLean's offered you a position on their staff? You certainly spend enough time here.

      Maybe that's saying something without words.

        • Arguably because of the title of this blog post: http://myblahg.com/?p=2294

          Incidentally my last post was deleted because of the words I'd quoted from your blahg.

          • or this one:
            http://myblahg.com/?p=1932

            Robert McClelland Says:
            March 4th, 2007 at 2:07 pm | |

            When the State starts rounding up my Jewish neighbours, I'll speak up

            Not me. People like Klownsella, Chernyuk and Smeagol the Jew have taught me it's not worth getting involved. When next they come for the Jews I doubt I'll even be able to muster up a “what a shame”.
            "

            You are a despicable person and everyone here needs to know that.

          • You are a despicable person and everyone here needs to know that.

            You don't know the half of it. I once told a racist joke. There, now you have twice as much evidence to support your claim that I'm despicable.

          • As it should have been. Taken out of context the title is offensive. In context though, it concisely summed up what the post addressed.

          • Incidentally my last post was deleted because of the words I'd quoted from your blahg.

            As it should have been. Taken out of context the title is offensive. In context though, it concisely summed up what the post addressed.

          • Incidentally my last post was deleted because of the words I'd quoted from your blahg.

            As it should have been. Taken out of context the title is offensive. In context though, it concisely summed up the attitude that the post addressed.

  2. Great interview and I did like Filthy Lucre. Unfortunately, what motivated it is similar to what I deduced with Rebel Sell:

    "I could give a really technical example of this: take the book The Corporation and the movie that came out with it. I thought that the movie was essentially duplicitous, and the book as well, in the sense that it was consciously misleading and intellectually irresponsible."

    It's again a reaction to something novel or interesting (if not exactly unassailable) long after the critique would have been useful. Hindsight is always 20/20, but what we need is clarity before a crisis occurs, not after it.

    But, that's how you grab the spotlight, I suppose. Find the parade and get in front of it.

      • Good gawd, that was even worse than the interview. Why do allegedly intellectual writers believe that inserting crackpot terms like "the left" do anything but alert readers that what they're about to say should not be treated seriously. And why do allegedly intellectual writers not understand that documentaries are made to introduce ideas and provoke discussion, not solve the world's dilemmas.

        • "Allegedly?" lol Maybe try out Heath's other recent book, "Following the Rules: Practical Reasoning and Deontic Constraint."
          Words like "intellectual" are a bit loaded, but Heath is generally regarded as one of the best moral & political philosophers of his generation.

          • Heath is generally regarded as one of the best moral & political philosophers of his generation.

            Is that supposed to be praise for Heath or condemnation of his generation? Given the level of self righteousness Heath displays in the examples of his work provided in this post so far I don't see how he could be regarded as the best of anything.

      • Yes, I read that long ago. I know he's been riding on The Corporation's notoriety for quite some time.

        • My point was that your complaint was that this critique came out "long after it would have been useful," when Joe published that essay the same time it came out.

  3. Thanks for linking to the interview. It was good. A nice follow up and summary of Filthy Lucre, which I couldn't put down a couple months ago.

    I found his answer as to the impact of his philosophical background interesting and something I have thought about a few times, particularly in some of grad school economic classes.

  4. I read this over the weekend and thought it was really interesting. Heath's thinking generally resonates with me, even while he "blames the victim", in a contemporary historical sense, he's preforming a laudable public service by toughening up the Left. I especially enjoyed his Left Hobbesian appellation, and the notion that large forms of social cooperation are intrinsically difficult enterprises.

    To push back, though, and cherry pick the final sentence from the 2004 piece that you just linked to, "If public ownership is not the solution, then private ownership can not be the problem", I'm not ready to swallow this line of argument. Private ownership, broadly speaking, can be the problem, particularly when there's too much of it. To a certain extent I subscribe to Micheal Heller's argument that too many property rights, the Tragedy of the Anticommons, actually inhibits innovation and under-utilizes socially valuable resources. I suspect that I'm being unfair to Heath, but I'm really just making a general point.

    Otherwise, if anyone has some free time, I thought this talkwith Heath was really, really interesting.

    • I watched the first twenty minutes by which time Heath had already savagely beaten a dozen strawmen.

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