Household net worth highest in mid-sized cities - Macleans.ca
 

Household net worth highest in mid-sized cities

Calgary homes deepest in debt in 2009, says survey


 

Mid-sized Canadian cities like Quebec City, Winnipeg, Halifax and Saskatoon saw household net worth jump by nearly 10 per cent in 2009, according to WealthScapes 2010, a national survey of household financial statistics. Canada’s commercial hubs, like Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal, posted net worth growth that hovered around or below the national average of 6.7 per cent. Calgary’s average household income, at $119,681, was $23,000 higher than any other city, but the figures can be misleading: The average household in Calgary had $184,850 dollars of debt. That’s nearly $25,000 more than Vancouver, and more than double Montreal. Cities where household net worth grew the most maintained the lowest levels of household savings. The level in Saskatoon grew 9.6 per cent in 2009, while each household has managed to save about $35,696 total. Torontonians have saved the most over all, with an average of $118,388 per household.

Globe and Mail


 
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Household net worth highest in mid-sized cities

  1. You guys are so bizarre. As usual you do stuff about 'Canadian Cities' and make a point to avoid including Ottawa. We're 4th largest in the country, but somehow you manage to talk about 8 cities stats without mentioning #4. Kind of like the 30min American documentary about icebergs I once watched where they never once mentioned Canada. At some point it's not just improbable, it's pointed.

    • We're in the great smokey shadow of Toronto I guess. That we're also the nation's capital doesn't seem to count for much.

    • Ottawa is actually fifth now in size and Calgary was more of a standout than Ottawa anyways. Ottawa was sticking pretty close to the national average, so even in silly surveys we are a sleepy town…

    • Yes, if only Macleans paid more attention to Ottawa…

  2. Ottawa is a twisted city, nor representative of Canada as a whole what with its huge civil servant class who, it goes without saying(But I will anyway), are pampered, protected, pension goldilocks insulated from the real world.