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I get press releases


 

Celebrate Punctuation Day with the iTunes Playlist from SpinVox

Party Down with Culture Club’s “Comma Chameleon,” Rihanna’s “Bracket Off” and More.

Hello,

National Punctuation Day (NPD) is September 24 and we thought you might be interested in sharing with your readers how they can celebrate a day that’s all about being grammatically correct with a few songs that might get them thinking about punctuation in a very fun and lighthearted way.

In the release provided below we have included an iTunes playlist compiled by SpinVox the mobile service that converts voice into text and then delivers the text as an SMS, email or blog entry. As a company that shares a passion for words and the way they appear on paper and electronically it seemed like a no brainer to help spread the word about NPD; especially since so many of us forget about punctuation when trying to shorten messages in our everyday lives.

If you wish to embed the playlist I would suggest using the link below rather than the one in the release.

[link]

Please let me know if you would like to hear more or if you have any questions.

Best,

Crisel

****
UPDATE: Here’s the only National Punctuation Day song you should be listening to. I loved this song, once upon a time:


 
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I get press releases

  1. “If you wish to embed the playlist I would suggest using the link below rather than the one in the release.”

    There should be a comma after the word ‘playlist’ in the above sentence. Isn’t It Ironic, don’t ya think?…

    Rock on.

  2. Putting a comma there is actually a stylistic choice as short prepositional phrases can go with or without commas. You’d typically do so if you wanted to emphasize the prepositional phrase about embedding the playlist.

  3. That may be, but it seems that there definitely should be a comma after “SpinVox” in the following sentence:

    “In the release provided below we have included an iTunes playlist compiled by SpinVox the mobile service that converts voice into text and then delivers the text as an SMS, email or blog entry.”

  4. Well, according to the Gregg Refernce Manual, you need to use the comma for prepositonal phrases when they are ‘infinitive’ (‘to play’). Also, I’m pretty sure the presence of a verb form demands it too.

    Now, am I supposed to pull the stick “from” or “out of” my ass? :)

  5. So Andrew, are you Paul Wells the grammarian?

    And Alex, isn’t SMS a kind of email?

    Sean: “Pull out of my ass the stick.”

    Can someone please remind me when to use an apostrophe in its? It’s driving me insane!

  6. Isn’t saying that only white people care about grammar sort of, well, insulting to everybody else?

    (Eats, Shoots, and Leaves was way funnier than that guy’s book anyway.)

  7. I’d like to note both the absence of Vampire Weekend’s “Oxford Comma” from the playlist, and the absence of an Oxford comma from the sub-headline.

    Is this one of those vast conspiracies?

  8. And what about 96 Tears, by Question Mark and the Mysterians?

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