"I'm sorry to tell you there is no money" - Macleans.ca
 

“I’m sorry to tell you there is no money”

British Labour minister’s parting words infuriate successor


 

Upon arriving at his new office, British Chief Secretary to the Treasury Liberal Democrat David Laws was expecting constructive advice from his predecessor. What he got, observes the Daily Mail, was more like a “final two-fingered salute.” In a handwritten note, his forerunner in the position, Labour minister Liam Byrne left him with these parting words: “Dear Chief Secretary, I’m afraid to tell you there is no money. Kind regards and good luck!” Though Byrne maintains the note was meant as “a joke from Chief Secretary to another,” Laws is reportedly furious, pointing to the national debt, which has been revealed to be nearly $3 trillion, as evidence that Labour has left the country’s finances in an “utterly ruinous state.” There is, of course, some truth behind every joke.

Daily Mail


 
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“I’m sorry to tell you there is no money”

  1. The only thing that would have made that even funnier is if Byrne started off with "Sorry old chap,……"

  2. Shouldn't a joke be, you know, funny? Is there anything funny about the pathetic financial health of so many allegedly grown-up countries?