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Israel urges world leaders to stick with Mubarak

Ambassadors to U.S., Canada, Russia and China asked to stress Egypt’s stability


 

Israel is urging several countries to curb their criticism of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak’s regime, according to a report in Haaretz, an Israeli newspaper. On Saturday, Israeli ambassadors were asked “to stress to their host countries the importance of Egypt’s stability.” Americans and Europeans are being swayed by public opinion, one senior Israeli official told the newspaper, and aren’t carefully considering their own interests. “Jordan and Saudi Arabia see the reactions in the West, how everyone is abandoning Mubarak, and this will have very serious implications.” Egypt is a crucial strategic ally to Israel in the Middle East.

Haaretz


 
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Israel urges world leaders to stick with Mubarak

  1. So what does it mean for "Canada's Principled New Foreign Policy" (TM) — which comprises standing up for "The Only Democracy in the Middle East"(TM) and "Not Coddling Dictators"(TM) — when "The Only Democracy in the Middle East"(TM) asks Canada to please coddle a dictator?

  2. So what does it mean for "Canada's Principled New Foreign Policy" (TM) — which comprises standing up for "The Only Democracy in the Middle East"(TM) and "Not Coddling Dictators"(TM) — when "The Only Democracy in the Middle East"(TM) asks Canada to please coddle a dictator?

    • Turkey and Lebanon actually electing governments, but maybe not the RIGHT governments…

    • In 1976 when I toured the mid-east, it was after a war,where the Israelis had fought with Egypt. In the north a went to the peace keeping line where Canada was. Today Israel occupiesthe Golan Heights, yet Syria has not ceded it to them. When I surveyed the damage to Port Said, there was resement toward Israel. Politically do not count on anything, even recent peace agreements with out the past being dealt with. Mumbarak is the middle man caught with a bad regime behind him, and an uncertain future for Egypt. He had to take peace, or face more battles, either country could afford or risk. Yes, he played a reluctant hand made up for him, now the people want a new hand deal. Its a gamble, but why keep a loosing hand. Mumbarak wants to finish the game before he leaves. Israel should be nervous, when nobody knows who the players are or who deals the next round of of the game peace poker.

  3. Harper will end up doing exactly what Israel says he should. Just watch.

  4. Harper will end up doing exactly what Israel says he should. Just watch.

  5. Israel urges world leaders to stick with Mubarak.

    The kiss of death.

  6. Israel urges world leaders to stick with Mubarak.

    The kiss of death.

  7. Turkey and Lebanon actually electing governments, but maybe not the RIGHT governments…

  8. Guess Israel should have tried to make friends with its neighbours and treated the Palestinians better.

  9. Guess Israel should have tried to make friends with its neighbours and treated the Palestinians better.

  10. This is no time to encourage democracy in countries ruled by dictators. Our economic recovery is fragile and the global community simply cannot afford any new democracies at the moment. Perhaps if the people spontaneously unite to demand their dignity and self-determination in a few years, when the global economy and oil markets are calmer, we will be prepared to listen.

    Also, why won't those damned Egyptians think of our Western interests before rising up against their oppressors? They didn't even ask our permission!

  11. This is no time to encourage democracy in countries ruled by dictators. Our economic recovery is fragile and the global community simply cannot afford any new democracies at the moment. Perhaps if the people spontaneously unite to demand their dignity and self-determination in a few years, when the global economy and oil markets are calmer, we will be prepared to listen.

    Also, why won't those damned Egyptians think of our Western interests before rising up against their oppressors? They didn't even ask our permission!

    • So we're not against democracy in certain countries, it's just the pace of removing dictators we're worried about. Right.
      Talking point – orderly transition.

  12. Arab democracy – Israel's worst nightmare.

  13. So we're not against democracy in certain countries, it's just the pace of removing dictators we're worried about. Right.
    Talking point – orderly transition.

  14. Arab democracy – Israel's worst nightmare.

    • Islamists winning democratic elections and turning the neighboring country
      into a Muslim Waqfs and subjecting all women – humanity's worst nightmare.

  15. So we're not against democracy in certain countries, it's just the pace of removing dictators we're worried about. Right.__Talking point – orderly transition.

  16. Israel's interest in a stable Egypt run by Mubarak is obvious. Indeed, a stable Egypt makes sense for all of its neighbour and partners. The question, however, should be what makes sense for Egyptians?

    While the desire for a moderate, democratic country echoes on the streets of Cairo, the likelihood of a democratic election which results in a favourable outcome for the people of Egypt is dubious. The examples of countries with governments have been overthrown through popular insurrection which have managed free and fair elections and have maintained a system of democracy over an extended period are few. Rather, governments fall, leaders are voted in, and within a year, an authoritarian, often radical regime has replaced the previous stable, corrupt government.

    That's not to say that Egyptians should not rally for change. In fact it's not to say that the West, or East or Middle East should not support the will of the Egyptian population. Instead, perhaps an examination of the probable alternatives ought to be undertaken. Without a viable, moderate candidate, the future of Egyptian democracy remains uncertain regardless.

  17. Israel's interest in a stable Egypt run by Mubarak is obvious. Indeed, a stable Egypt makes sense for all of its neighbour and partners. The question, however, should be what makes sense for Egyptians?

    While the desire for a moderate, democratic country echoes on the streets of Cairo, the likelihood of a democratic election which results in a favourable outcome for the people of Egypt is dubious. The examples of countries with governments have been overthrown through popular insurrection which have managed free and fair elections and have maintained a system of democracy over an extended period are few. Rather, governments fall, leaders are voted in, and within a year, an authoritarian, often radical regime has replaced the previous stable, corrupt government.

    That's not to say that Egyptians should not rally for change. In fact it's not to say that the West, or East or Middle East should not support the will of the Egyptian population. Instead, perhaps an examination of the probable alternatives ought to be undertaken. Without a viable, moderate candidate, the future of Egyptian democracy remains uncertain regardless.

  18. Islamists winning democratic elections and turning the neighboring country
    into a Muslim Waqfs and subjecting all women – humanity's worst nightmare.

  19. The arrogant, "fool on the hill" Harper apparently, in his short-sighted rush to support Israel unconditionally and ignore the Palestinians rights failed to realize that he was also ignoring the millions of people living in the surrounding countries under despotic rulers. Neither Netanyahu or Harper will have any effect on the situation in Egypt as the Egyptian people will decide for themselves. In the end Harper's unilateral support for Israel and the US's double dealing in the peace processes will show that neither were very good friends of Israel.

  20. The arrogant, "fool on the hill" Harper apparently, in his short-sighted rush to support Israel unconditionally and ignore the Palestinians rights failed to realize that he was also ignoring the millions of people living in the surrounding countries under despotic rulers. Neither Netanyahu or Harper will have any effect on the situation in Egypt as the Egyptian people will decide for themselves. In the end Harper's unilateral support for Israel and the US's double dealing in the peace processes will show that neither were very good friends of Israel.

  21. In 1976 when I toured the mid-east, it was after a war,where the Israelis had fought with Egypt. In the north a went to the peace keeping line where Canada was. Today Israel occupiesthe Golan Heights, yet Syria has not ceded it to them. When I surveyed the damage to Port Said, there was resement toward Israel. Politically do not count on anything, even recent peace agreements with out the past being dealt with. Mumbarak is the middle man caught with a bad regime behind him, and an uncertain future for Egypt. He had to take peace, or face more battles, either country could afford or risk. Yes, he played a reluctant hand made up for him, now the people want a new hand deal. Its a gamble, but why keep a loosing hand. Mumbarak wants to finish the game before he leaves. Israel should be nervous, when nobody knows who the players are or who deals the next round of of the game peace poker.

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