27

It’s beginning to look a lot like … a fall election?

Tories hold campaign training conference, Liberals nominate candidates


 

Hey, remember that bullet that we thought we dodged in June, when Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff cut a deal with the Conservatives to join forces and save the employment insurance system, thus sparing the country from having to trudge to the polls this year? Turns out the celebrations may have been premature. The Hill Times reports that the Conservative Party has plunged ahead with plans to hold a two-day candidate training conference this week in Ottawa, which will school political hopefuls in “social media, voter contact methods, fundraising and dealing with the media,” among other things. Meanwhile, the Liberal Party has laid down the law in a letter to local riding associations, who have been instructed to hold at least one fundraiser this summer, and ensure that all currently vacant nomination slots are filled by fall.

The Hill Times


 
Filed under:

It’s beginning to look a lot like … a fall election?

  1. Liberal Party has laid down the law in a letter to local riding associations, who have been instructed to hold at least one fundraiser this summer = this is too funny!

    • Fundraising has been ongoing. According to the last elections canada report the national party is financially in good shape to run a national election. Fundraisers at the local level would be to ensure that the ridings can all contribute their fair share so that the national organisation would not have to carry the entire burden of an election.

    • Fundraising has been ongoing. According to the last elections canada report the party is in good shape to run a national election. Fundraisers at the local level would be to ensure that the ridings can all contribute their fair share so that the national organisation would not have to carry the entire burden of an election.

    • go back and read it again you are missing something – your date was from the previous one!

      • Why that can't be, because the legislation clearly states that the first one should be on October 19, 2009. Surely our conservative government wouldn't have wasted the valuable time of the House and Senate generating legislation that does absolutely nothing, after all.. it was a campaign promise!

        • I guess I had better stop paying GST too then…I remember an old grumpy man mumbling something about getting rid of the GST a long time ago.

          I wonder if that old man is in prison yet, he sure seemed like he could have been a criminal.

          • No worries, the guy who promised getting rid of that GST thing? He's no longer in office at all. I'm glad to see you agree that the guy who made this campaign promise shouldn't be in power anymore either.

          • please, dakota, stop. thwim is far too annoying to encourage. that's the dumbest exchange i've ever read.

  2. I highly doubt a fall election if the economy is picking up. Ignatieff will be too afraid of allowing Harper to claim credit for the recovery. He had his chance this spring but didn't pull the trigger and now Liberals everywhere are trying to put a negative spin on all the positive news.

    I predict a lot more huffing and puffing from Ignatieff but I can't see the house falling anytime soon.

    • spot on! – right now the way things are going Iggy will not be able to use the economy going into the toilet excuse for an election so he will have to either find or create an issue which requires creative thinking to which there has been little evidence of coming from him since he was crowned leader!

  3. Are you kidding me? Another election?

  4. The fall will be Ignatieff's last best chance, since unemployment will stabilize and decline after the fall. He may still lose the election, but he will almost certainly gain enough seats that the party will give him another kick at the can. Harper will have no incentive for a fall election, however, and may cut deals to avoid one.

  5. The tining of an election isn't up to Iggy as the BLOC and or the NDP would decide if Iggy tries …

  6. "…having to trudge to the polls this year"

    Nobody is forced to vote. Frankly, I think our government does way too much on my behalf that I would prefer it not to do. I am glad to have the chance to tell the government what I think of it with my vote, however insignificant that vote may be.

    If you really think that going to the polls is a "trudge", I suggest you stay home; that would make my vote worth that much more.

    • I agree, people complain about voting as if it is hard or onerous. I live abroad so it takes a bit of extra effort, but for most people it is an incredibly easy thing to do. It takes 15 minutes. The other common complaint is that elections are too expensive. Our government is spending 260 billion dollars this year. If the parties can't agree on a budget, it is absolutely worthwhile to spend at most 300 million so that the Canadian people can elect a government that (hopefully) can deliver a budget. Even if we had elections each year it would represent only .12% of all federal spending. That is a bargain when you consider the cost of deadlock.

  7. Meh, it sounds more like a Cold War style stockpiling of arms on each side. Can't let the other side have more candidates at the ready in silos, or the whole M.A.D. deterrent won't work.

    • Nice. Basically the Cuban Missile Crisis but with peanut butter sandwiches instead of nukes.

  8. Meh, it sounds more like a Cold War style stockpiling of arms on each side. Can't let the other side have more candidates stockpiled in silos, or the whole M.A.D. deterrent won't work.

  9. Not to be rude, but to everyone who is complaining about voting again: Shut up.
    Voting is not only a right and a responsibility, it is a privilege for which we should be grateful. Grateful for the fact that we live in a democratic system. Grateful for the opportunity to make our voices heard. Grateful for the fact that, issues with the system aside, our votes will all be counted and the government will reflect at least some of the will of some of the people, and that Parliament as a whole will reflect the will of the people.
    I welcome an election, because it makes me grateful that I live in a country where our voices matter.

    • I'm not sure that voting is a right and a privilege. It seems to me that rights are what a free nation of people establish in constitution and erect a government to protect. Privileges, on the other hand, are whatever gifts a good and gracious monarch decides to grant his/her poor, miserable subjects.

      Canada has always seemed to have yet decided whether it is a country of free citizens or a dominion of the British Crown. I think it might be time (actually, I think it has been time for a while) that we wash the queen's shrivelled, ugly face off our currency and send the Governor General hunting for seal hearts in the Arctic.

      • I agree about the monarchy, I am a republican in the traditional sense.
        However, when I referred to voting as a "privilege" I referred to what it represents: that we are privileged to live in a country where we have the right to vote, amongst the many other rights that Canadians enjoy.

  10. The only people who want an election are hard-core Liberal partisans although their desire for an election is directly related to their standing in the polls, which is why they've been wimping out on a continual basis since 2006. They've threatened an election continuously since January 2006 but could never screw up the courage to force one. Then, when the Conservatives gave the Libeals their chance in October 2008, Liberals complained that the Conservatives had precipitated an election. No wonder Canadians fled from the Liberals in droves in that election. Only 1 in 4 Canadians voted for them.

    The current crop of Liberals want power for power's sake. They want power without a platform, they want power despite having agreed with the Conservative agenda on virtually every important economic or social policy plank including the Conservative tough-on-crime agenda.

    • "Only 1 in 4 Canadians voted for them."

      Unlike the groundswell of support the Conservatives inspired with 1 in 3 Canadians voting for them.

      • Not to get all "math geek" on you, but 3 out of 8 is a more accurate ratio:

        1/3 = 0.333
        3/8 = 0.375
        Actual pop. vote share for the conservatives: 0.3765

      • Not to get all "math geek" on you, but 3 out of 8 is a more accurate ratio:

        1/3 = 0.333
        3/8 = 0.375
        Actual pop. vote share for the Conservatives: 0.3765

Sign in to comment.