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Mass protests rock Egypt

‘Day of revolt’ brings thousands out onto streets of Cairo


 

On the heels of the Tunisian protests that saw President Zine al-Abadine Ben Ali ousted, police struggled to push back an unexpected number of protestors in the streets of Cairo on Tuesday. Such anti-government demonstrations are rare in Egypt, where strongman President Hosni Mubarak has ruled authoritatively for thirty years. The call for a ‘day of revolt’ was organized on Facebook, with tens of thousands saying they would attend. But the turnout was far greater than expected, with police struggling to contain the size and fury of the crowd. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton expressed support for the right of the Egyptian people to demonstrate their right to peacefully protest, but called for restraint from both sides, saying the Egyptian government is “looking for ways to respond to the legitimate needs and interests of the Egyptian people.” There are also reports of similar protests in the cities of Alexandria and Ismailya. The Egyptians have similar grievances to the Tunisians, with government corruption, rising food prices and unemployment.

BBC News


 
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Mass protests rock Egypt

  1. Haha, "restraint from both sides"? The Israel-Palestine style rhetoric seems to have spread. Seriously though, that nonsensical rhetoric doesn't work or apply there, what on earth would give her the idea it would work or apply for Egypt?

  2. Haha, "restraint from both sides"? The Israel-Palestine style rhetoric seems to have spread. Seriously though, that nonsensical rhetoric doesn't work or apply there, what on earth would give her the idea it would work or apply for Egypt?

  3. Dominoes.

    I'm hoping Saudi Arabia is next.

  4. Dominoes.

    I'm hoping Saudi Arabia is next.

  5. Cool….

    The more time these Muslim backwaters run by dictators and thugs spend beating down their own people……

    the less time they have to plan for attacks on ours.

  6. Cool….

    The more time these Muslim backwaters run by dictators and thugs spend beating down their own people……

    the less time they have to plan for attacks on ours.

    • You forgot the part where it syas "Aided and abetted by the United States of America". The Americans support the most brutal dictators like Hosni Mubarak and then when they are deposed by the people, they cry "radicals have taken over!"
      When the US supported monarchies like Saudi Arabia, Jordan and the Emirates crumble under the weight of popular uprisings, the Americans and the Israelis are going to have their hands full!

      • Yeah, the US has supported brutal dictators for years and are then surprised anyone objects!

        It's time the US went home and minded it's own business, and let other people deal with their own affairs.

        • Emily wrote:
          "It's time the US went home and minded it's own business, and let other people deal with their own affairs. "

          Ummm…..you do realize, that if the USA followed your advice not too long ago…….Europe would be speaking German right?

    • you are an ignorant SOB

    • Actually, the more those leaders require a distraction the more there is going to be a motivation for attacks on 'our' countries.

  7. You forgot the part where it syas "Aided and abetted by the United States of America". The Americans support the most brutal dictators like Hosni Mubarak and then when they are deposed by the people, they cry "radicals have taken over!"
    When the US supported monarchies like Saudi Arabia, Jordan and the Emirates crumble under the weight of popular uprisings, the Americans and the Israelis are going to have their hands full!

  8. I can list at least 35 more countries where the people have been treated similar to the Tunisians. Countries where the rich get richer and the poor get poorer.
    Countries where unemployment is high,
    Countries where the governments are run by big money and corporations.
    Countries where tthe poorer people have no access to proper health care.
    oooops. I seem to be describing the U.S. Sorry about that.

  9. I can list at least 35 more countries where the people have been treated similar to the Tunisians. Countries where the rich get richer and the poor get poorer.
    Countries where unemployment is high,
    Countries where the governments are run by big money and corporations.
    Countries where tthe poorer people have no access to proper health care.
    oooops. I seem to be describing the U.S. Sorry about that.

  10. John and Ralph…..

    spoken like True Liberal party members.

  11. John and Ralph…..

    spoken like True Liberal party members.

    • If everyone who ever disagreed with you was actually a 'Liberal party member' we wouldn't have any other parties in the country.

  12. Yeah, the US has supported brutal dictators for years and are then surprised anyone objects!

    It's time the US went home and minded it's own business, and let other people deal with their own affairs.

  13. If everyone who ever disagreed with you was actually a 'Liberal party member' we wouldn't have any other parties in the country.

  14. So…I've yet to decipher whether this (and the events in Tunisia) are a good thing…or a bad thing…

    Remember that the overthrow of the Shah of Iran was engineered and executed by "progressives" in the society…but ultimately (rather quickly actually) the Islamic clerics stepped in to fill the void and installed a repressive theocracy.

    I'm wondering if the same pattern is about to be repeated in Tunisia and Egypt? Protest by people against an autocratic regime…looking for democracy, modernization, improved human rights and economy….resulting in just about the exact opposite.

  15. So…I've yet to decipher whether this (and the events in Tunisia) are a good thing…or a bad thing…

    Remember that the overthrow of the Shah of Iran was engineered and executed by "progressives" in the society…but ultimately (rather quickly actually) the Islamic clerics stepped in to fill the void and installed a repressive theocracy.

    I'm wondering if the same pattern is about to be repeated in Tunisia and Egypt? Protest by people against an autocratic regime…looking for democracy, modernization, improved human rights and economy….resulting in just about the exact opposite.

    • The Shah's overthrow was engineered by the Ayatollah….they had worked for years to accomplish it, so naturally they were able to step into place.

      There hasn't been any hint of that in Tunisia or Egypt so far. But since most 'progressives' have ended up in jail in those countries….or dead….it could certainly take place again.

    • Generally power will find its way to the strongest element in situations like these. Without outside assistance, the strongest element is generally going to be people who you wouldn't want running your store let alone your country.

      It's a process but it's definitely taking the hard route to get there.

  16. The Shah's overthrow was engineered by the Ayatollah….they had worked for years to accomplish it, so naturally they were able to step into place.

    There hasn't been any hint of that in Tunisia or Egypt so far. But since most 'progressives' have ended up in jail in those countries….or dead….it could certainly take place again.

  17. It's poor journalism not to note that the Tunisian and now Egyptian populist liberation movements have been aided by only one western group in their moment of need, the hactkivists who are acting as 3rd party proxy sources and mirroring twitter and facebook, so the revolutionaries can continue to chat with each other even after the fascist states have blocked citizen access to those sites. After decades of the left & right blathering on about human rights and failed states, a bunch of e-nerds are the only ones with the courage (or apparently the knowledge) to assist the Tunisians' and Egyptians' free speech.

  18. It's poor journalism not to note that the Tunisian and now Egyptian populist liberation movements have been aided by only one western group in their moment of need, the hactkivists who are acting as 3rd party proxy sources and mirroring twitter and facebook, so the revolutionaries can continue to chat with each other even after the fascist states have blocked citizen access to those sites. After decades of the left & right blathering on about human rights and failed states, a bunch of e-nerds are the only ones with the courage (or apparently the knowledge) to assist the Tunisians' and Egyptians' free speech.

  19. you are an ignorant SOB

  20. Generally power will find its way to the strongest element in situations like these. Without outside assistance, the strongest element is generally going to be people who you wouldn't want running your store let alone your country.

    It's a process but it's definitely taking the hard route to get there.

  21. Actually, the more those leaders require a distraction the more there is going to be a motivation for attacks on 'our' countries.

  22. Vatro noted:

    “Actually, the more those leaders require a distraction the more there is going to be a motivation for attacks on ‘our’ countries.”

    Actually, that’s a very good point. They’ve been using Israel for that for a long time already……..

  23. Vatro noted:
    “Actually, the more those leaders require a distraction the more there is going to be a motivation for attacks on ‘our’ countries.”

    Actually, that’s a very good point. They’ve been using Israel for that for a long time already……..

  24. Emily wrote:
    "It's time the US went home and minded it's own business, and let other people deal with their own affairs. "

    Ummm…..you do realize, that if the USA followed your advice not too long ago…….Europe would be speaking German right?

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