Men most likely to support decriminalizing prostitution - Macleans.ca
 

Men most likely to support decriminalizing prostitution

Prairie residents and younger Canadians most opposed


 

A new poll for QMI Media found that 60 per cent of Canadian men approve of decriminalizing prostitution, compared to just 38 per cent of women. The survey also found support for legal prostitution was higher among all Canadians over the age of 35, with 50 per cent support, compared to just 39 per cent support among 18-34 year-olds. Mario Canseco of Angus Reid told QMI that while the gender divide on the issue was known, but the age divide was a surprise. Support for prostitution was highest in Quebec (54 per cent) and lowest in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (23 per cent). The federal government plans to appeal the Ontario court ruling that struck down Canada’s prostitution laws.

Toronto Sun


 
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Men most likely to support decriminalizing prostitution

  1. And in other news….

    Pot smokers most likely to support decriminalizing marijuana.

    Young males most likely to support car insurance reforms.

    Women most likely to support tax free shoe sales.

    • Bad spellers most likely to misspell?

  2. As noted in the article, it is unsurprising that men support legalization in higher numbers. What is surprising is the differential between men and women (one would assume that women would resent being told what to do – or not do – with their bodies), and the age group difference.

    I would be interested to see a more information as to the motivation behind the opinions.

  3. Men want to know their daughters will have a source of income if all else fails, that's all.

    • If that was your attempt at humour, it stunk !

      • Pull that foot out of your mouth and try again!

    • speak for yourself, turd!!

  4. Well as a male from Saskatchewan… I am definitely NOT in favour of decriminalization of selling your body for temporary gain.

    • Temporary gain like going to university? What is your opinion on gold diggers? I ask because young women regularly exchange sex with older men for gifts, should this be illegal as well?

      • Selling sex was never illegal, negotating in public was!
        It is the pimp (male or female) that makes ir dirty.

  5. There is no general crime of prostitution in Canada, the exchange of sex for consideration is not criminal.

  6. there is no such THING as "decriminalize". It is a non-word meaning a non-thing. Something is either legal, or it isn't. regulated, or not.

    stop using the D-word. It means literally nothing.

    • Something can be illegal without being criminal. Like speeding.

    • decriminalize, decriminalise [diːˈkrɪmənəˌlaɪz]
      vb
      (Law) (tr) to remove (an action) from the legal category of criminal offence to decriminalize the possession of marijuana
      decriminalization , decriminalisation n

      ref: Collins English Dictionary

      • Coles Concise says; de- means reverse or undo. Bad laws must be de-ed.

  7. Prostitution makes sex cheaper for men. Increased supply undercuts the market for sex. That is why women don't like it, and men do. But making brothels illegal endangers the lives of women, so it should be legal, and not merely decriminalized. The government should not regulate either marriage or prostitution, and treat both as private contracts.

  8. Is it OK for boys to be prostitutes? There are such people. I am sometimes amazed at some women who think that only women can be or are P's. What about "cute" young guys who look after the "needs" of older women?
    Oh! You didn't know there were such people—wise up!

    • There's a much bigger market for cute young guys among gay males. Either way, so what?

      Prostitution and marijuana should both be legal, regulated (health standards) and taxed (just like everything else). Bring the money into the marketplace from underground, contribute to the economic tax base, and offer the protection (to sellers and buyers) of some basic minimum standards (like those on health care or spa practitioners, and those on food and pharmaceuticals).

  9. I believe the de-criminalization of prostitution, marijuana, etc……vices/habits that do not harm anyone but the user, is a good thing. Paying for sex is an individual choice and if a man/woman is over 18, it is none of our business and does promote income. Smoking marijuana is harmless and does not lead to heavier drugs in most cases – the heavier drugs are illegal and should remain so. Smoking marijuana is no worse than smoking cigarettes and we have not criminalized that vice which kills far more than prostitution and/or marijuana.

  10. Making prostitution illegal does nothing to eliminate it. Making it illegal does not prevent exploitation of women, it increases it. Making prostitution forces many women to break the law in order to feed and clothe themselves. Making prostitution does not prevent prostitutes and their customers from contracting STDs. Making prostitution illegal eases the conscience of those who seek to deny its existence and who find it easy to ignore the facts.
    If prostitution was decriminalized, some prostitutes might actually enjoy their work, use drugs less if at all, earn a higher income, work in a healthier and safer physical and mental environment, gain more long term job security, be able to seek help if abused, have access to healthcare, be able to consider themselves citizens not criminals.
    If prostitution was decriminalized, prostitutes would not have to be streetwalkers other than to serve the needs of clients who have that fetish. Prostitution services would be regulated, licensed, supervised, and located in designated areas.

    If prostitution was decriminalized, pimps would have to obtain honest work or pick another crime to apply their dubious skills to. Egocentric do-gooders who for years have ignored the facts about prostitution, would have to find another cause to occupy their time – why not actually talk to some prostitutes and try to help them rather than criminalize them?

    To ignore the facts about prostitution and continue to criminalize it is to support the needs of the pimps and drug pushers and ignore the needs of the many victims of child abuse who enter this industry (ironically) while trying to escape abuse and exploitation.