Montreal firm bid far less than competitors for Parliament Hill reno - Macleans.ca
 

Montreal firm bid far less than competitors for Parliament Hill reno

New docs show bid was nearly $2 million below second-lowest estimate


 

The Montreal construction company that was awarded the now-contested $8.9-million contract for a Parliament Hill renovation project bid $2 million below the second-lowest estimate, new documents show. That’s a big margin, given that the four other bids came in within $500,000 of each other. How LM Sauve, the construction company, made it to the shortlist for the reno, and then won over other much larger companies, is the question at the heart of the controversy over the contract. The RCMP is investigating a possible breach of lobbying rules and anti-corruption laws but Paul Sauve, head of the company, maintains that his firm was qualified for the job, citing past work on federal office buildings in Montreal, and upcoming project on Vancouver’s city hall. He says he hired Tory-connected Quebec businessman Gilles Varin to help get the work and paid him $140,000 for his efforts. Though LM Sauve won the job in 2008, the company went bankrupt a year later and lost the contract.

Toronto Star


 
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Montreal firm bid far less than competitors for Parliament Hill reno

  1. So now how are the idiots going to blame harper for this company getting the contract? The other companys wanted biger profits because like any goverment bid its all ways much higher for the goverments.That is all there was to the story.

  2. You know what they say… "If it seems too good to be true…"

  3. Some more contracts!

    Name & Title Organization Top Salary*
    Harold Varmus, M.D., President/CEO Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center $2,677,306
    Wayne LaPierre, Executive VP/Ex-Officio National Rifle Association & Foundation, respectively $1,281,635
    Donald Thomas, Deputy CEO American Cancer Society $1,212,293
    Robert J. Mazzuca, Chief Scout Executive Boy Scouts of America – N.O. $1,163,472
    Michael Friedman, M.D., President/CEO City of Hope $1,134,737
    M. Cass Wheeler, Past CEO American Heart Association/American Stroke Association $1,090,769
    Includes $300,000 severence payment.
    Brian A. Gallagher, President/CEO
    United Way Worldwide $1,037,140
    Includes "non-qualified pension imputed income of $410,131."
    Edwin J. Feulner, President Heritage Foundation $1,008,094

  4. Roxanne Spillett, President/Governor Boys & Girls Clubs of America – N.O. $988,591
    Includes $363,000 supplemental executive retirement plan contributions and $385,500 deferred compensation.
    Ernest Allen, President/CEO National Center for Missing & Exploited Children $983,919
    Includes a "catch-up" amount for under-funded retirement benefits in previous years of $315,847 and $403,050 deferred compensation.
    Richard Kahn, Chief Scientific & Medical Officer American Diabetes Association $972,772
    Includes $585,734 deferred compensation, which includes a one-time accrual for salary to be paid in 2009 and 2010, before Dr. Kahn's planned retirement.
    Edward J. Benz, M.D., President Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Jimmy Fund $940,850

  5. Steven E. Sanderson, President/CEO Wildlife Conservation Society $938,199
    Jonathan W. Simons, M.D., President/CEO Prostate Cancer Foundation $903,442
    Chester Tylkowski, M.D., Chief of Staff Shriners Hospitals for Children $845,951
    Howard Rieger, President/CEO Jewish Federations of North America $801,866
    David A. Harris, Executive Director American Jewish Committee $796,353
    James E. Williams, Jr., CEO Easter Seals $781,000
    William E. Evans, Director/CEO St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/ALSAC $742,718
    Robert J. Beall, President/CEO Cystic Fibrosis Foundation $740,057
    Harry Johns, President/CEO Alzheimer's Association $737,430
    Includes $510,068 deferred compensation.
    Christopher DeMuth, Past President American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research $731,787

  6. John P. Howe, III, M.D., President/CEO Project HOPE/People-to-People Health Foundation $730,506
    Myra Biblowit, President Breast Cancer Research Foundation $717,174
    Rabbi Yechiel Eckstein, President
    International Fellowship of Christians & Jews $696,737

    * Includes “Compensation,” “Contributions to employee benefit plans,” “Expense accounts and other allowances,” and deferred compensation earned in reporting year, as reported to the IRS. Compensation of medical professionals may include fees for patient care in addition to salary.

  7. Top management heavy, bloated already city of
    Montreal is launching a hiring and training drive to counter infrastructures
    projects municipal corruption by “strengthening” the municipal civil service.
    The city now ill be hiring and training personnel in departments where the city
    doesn’t have enough skills, personnel expertise to monitor spending, the quality
    of work by outside firms and hopefully it will prevent collusion in contract
    bidding. One quarter of all City of Montreal contracts EVEN in the LAST five
    years have been awarded to the same 10 companies, a situation Mayor Gérald
    Tremblay said the city was already aware of FOR YEARS BUT HAD NOT PROPERLY
    ADDRESSED IT YET. Unacceptable. MUCH TOO LATE FOR A CITY THAT HAS BEEN MANAGED
    FOR OVER 350 YEARS.When it comes to contract awarding, ethics and the management
    of major projects the city of Montreal for decades even has dropped the ball. It
    seems the Montreal-area municipalities are now paying as much as 40 per cent
    more for work than other cities in Canada.”The city of Montreal is launching a
    hiring and training drive to counter municipal corruption by “strengthening” the
    municipal civil service. The city of Montreal
    , apparently still relies too heavily on the decency, ethics of outside
    contractors who we tend to know they cannot be trusted The city of Montreal
    falsely claims The city of Montreal now only admits it lacks personnel to
    adequately deal with projects, even to compare bids with the price of work
    performed in other cities, and now the city of Montreal
    only now wants to invest in Project management hiring, training training, such
    as even how to write contract specifications in a way that ensures adequate
    competition, These essential
    resources next hopefully should bring about a decrease in projects costs through
    better project management and provide even a better control over prices and bids
    that now should have been part of all bid tenders, issuing already. Project
    management and project engineering by far is not a new science but has already
    been elsewhere a standard practice for bid tendering’s, management for deadest
    too. The city of Montreal says that now now it will be hiring and
    training personnel in departments where the city doesn’t have enough skills,
    personnel expertise to monitor spending, the quality of work by outside firms
    and thus hopefully it will prevent collusion in contract bidding. Present city
    of Montreal vulnerable bidding, purchasing areas include the city’s finance,
    purchasing, legal, computer-systems departments and in project-management and
    urban planning. Project managers in the rest of Canada have even already now
    existed the last 50 years..so why has the city been dragging it’s heals here for
    deadest even?