MS patient dies after neck surgery in Costa Rica - Macleans.ca
 

MS patient dies after neck surgery in Costa Rica

Controversial vein treatment isn’t approved in Canada


 

An Ontario man who had multiple sclerosis died in October after controversial surgery to open up a blocked neck vein that he believed was causing his disease. St. Catherines resident Mahir Mostic, 35, died one day after Costa Rican doctors tried to fix a blood clot that emerged shortly after his original surgery in June. Mostic had a fast-moving type of MS that prevented him from walking, so he was willing to risk neck vein surgery, which is not approved by Health Canada. After the surgery, “He started feeling better and got his energy back,” his girlfriend, Bedrana Jelin told CBC News. Then, his symptoms worsened again and he tried to see a specialist in Canada. “They didn’t want to touch him because he was done outside of Canada,” Jelin said. That’s when he flew back to Costa Rica, where Dr. Marcial Fallas treated him with blood-thinning medication to remove a clot that had formed. Fallas says the blood thinners likely caused his death. Dr. Barry Rubin, the head of vascular surgery at Toronto’s University Health Network, says it would have been safer to leave the clot alone. He also said he treated an MS patient recently who had blood clots after receiving neck vein surgery in Mexico. In Canada and the U.S., there are several research studies underway to determine whether vein narrowing surgery is safe and effective.

CBC News


 
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MS patient dies after neck surgery in Costa Rica

  1. What the article fails to mention about this death, is that the patient had a stent. That increases the risks of clotting considerably. What is mind-boggling is that he couldn't get follow-up care here…do we not treat people from other countries if they fall ill here?

    The procedure is not experimental…the idea of using it to allieve symptomology of MS is.

    Coincidentally, my GP just phoned all her MS pts to tell us she is totally onside if we choose to get the angio. She has seen improvements in her two pts that have already gone.

    Canada…wake up…I never thought I'd have to go to the US for health care…

  2. What the article fails to mention about this death, is that the patient had a stent. That increases the risks of clotting considerably. What is mind-boggling is that he couldn't get follow-up care here…do we not treat people from other countries if they fall ill here?

    The procedure is not experimental…the idea of using it to allieve symptomology of MS is.

    Coincidentally, my GP just phoned all her MS pts to tell us she is totally onside if we choose to get the angio. She has seen improvements in her two pts that have already gone.

    Canada…wake up…I never thought I'd have to go to the US for health care…

  3. Treatment and trials can be done here in Canada just as easily as is now occurring in the United States. Doctors here can also start helping those who have developed complications, those forced to go elsewhere for treatment, those Dr.'s can very well treat patients who come home and have complications. This man did not have to die. Doctors here in Canada have zero compassion. What a joke. Time for a new health minister, time for a new government.

  4. Treatment and trials can be done here in Canada just as easily as is now occurring in the United States. Doctors here can also start helping those who have developed complications, those forced to go elsewhere for treatment, those Dr.'s can very well treat patients who come home and have complications. This man did not have to die. Doctors here in Canada have zero compassion. What a joke. Time for a new health minister, time for a new government.

  5. his symptoms worsened again and he tried to see a specialist in Canada. “They didn't want to touch him because he was done outside of Canada,”

    I agree with Wheelie, what is shocking is that Canadian doctors refused to help him with follow-up care.

  6. his symptoms worsened again and he tried to see a specialist in Canada. “They didn't want to touch him because he was done outside of Canada,”

    I agree with Wheelie, what is shocking is that Canadian doctors refused to help him with follow-up care.

    • That might not be the real reason why they do not want to touch him. As veins are closer to the surface and thinner compared to arteries, vein stents are a dangerous thing, and complication abounds from them collapsing and rupturing of the veins. If that patient died in the doctor's office, that Canadian doctor will be the professional who will face the consequences of litigations which will very much increase (fault or no fault) his/her liability insurance cost, let alone has to face the media and professional fall out. It's a very sad situation but it is very difficult to blame the doctor for his/her refusal.

  7. Having a stent placed in veins increase the risk of more blockage and collapsing stents. As veins are closer to the surface than arteries, stent could easily collapse from pressure and certain movements of the neck, and may even cause vein ruptures. They should instead address the root cause of vein blockage or what really causes MS, instead of this band aid treatments that only give temporary relief but risky long term effects.

  8. Having a stent placed in veins increase the risk of more blockage and collapsing stents. As veins are closer to the surface than arteries, stent could easily collapse from pressure and certain movements of the neck, and may even cause vein ruptures. They should instead address the root cause of vein blockage or what really causes MS, instead of this band aid treatments that only give temporary relief but risky long term effects.

  9. That might not be the real reason why they do not want to touch him. As veins are closer to the surface and thinner compared to arteries, vein stents are a dangerous thing, and complication abounds from them collapsing and rupturing of the veins. If that patient died in the doctor's office, that Canadian doctor will be the professional who will face the consequences of litigations which will very much increase (fault or no fault) his/her liability insurance cost, let alone has to face the media and professional fall out. It's a very sad situation but it is very difficult to blame the doctor for his/her refusal.

  10. This has gone completely out of hand since the treatment was announced. I have a colleague who went to Europe at her own expense for the treatment. She was off work for months before going and now she is doing so well that she is back at work, excercising at the gym and managing her life again.

    All the talk of the Liability associated with treating people that have had surgery out of country goes against the idea that is the basis of the CANADIAN MEDICAL PROTECTIVE ASSOCIATION. It is GROUP insurance and does NOT raise the premiums based on an individual doctor being sued.

    This article explains it completely: http://news.injuryboard.com/canadian-malpractice-

    Not to mention that in not every case does the Doctor even pay these premiums. The publicly funded hospital he works for does.

    When are Canadians going to crawl out from under the wool blanket we are so comfortable under? The only time it happens is when we personally get sick, or have a loved one that has been failed by the system is my guess.

  11. This has gone completely out of hand since the treatment was announced. I have a colleague who went to Europe at her own expense for the treatment. She was off work for months before going and now she is doing so well that she is back at work, excercising at the gym and managing her life again.

    All the talk of the Liability associated with treating people that have had surgery out of country goes against the idea that is the basis of the CANADIAN MEDICAL PROTECTIVE ASSOCIATION. It is GROUP insurance and does NOT raise the premiums based on an individual doctor being sued.

    This article explains it completely: http://news.injuryboard.com/canadian-malpractice-

    Not to mention that in not every case does the Doctor even pay these premiums. The publicly funded hospital he works for does.

    When are Canadians going to crawl out from under the wool blanket we are so comfortable under? The only time it happens is when we personally get sick, or have a loved one that has been failed by the system is my guess.

    • I absolutely agree! The medical system in Canada is broken (or at least very ill). I think Canadians have used the "at least we're not as bad as the American system" as an excuse to ignore how poor our health care has become. I don't think that Tommy Douglas intended our current system of health "care" when he promoted universal health coverage. I think it's time we started looking elsewhere for comparison of how universal health care should be.

  12. I absolutely agree! The medical system in Canada is broken (or at least very ill). I think Canadians have used the "at least we're not as bad as the American system" as an excuse to ignore how poor our health care has become. I don't think that Tommy Douglas intended our current system of health "care" when he promoted universal health coverage. I think it's time we started looking elsewhere for comparison of how universal health care should be.

  13. Currently , what is the rate of Success around the Globe , if it's plus 60% , improvement in Patient's , then the doctor's the are doing this prodedure , must be onto something. Have the Patiend's write a 3 month,6 months , 9 month & One Year Progress ( Report ) , then we can determine if they are living Better ( Post MS Surgery ) , than what they were living Prior to this Surgery. If 60% have shown Improvement , then we are on to something , & need to prefect this system. The folk's that don't have ( MS ) , will Sit Back & wait , bacause it doesn't effect them Personally. Thank You , Robt. D. Miles

  14. Currently , what is the rate of Success around the Globe , if it's plus 60% , improvement in Patient's , then the doctor's the are doing this prodedure , must be onto something. Have the Patiend's write a 3 month,6 months , 9 month & One Year Progress ( Report ) , then we can determine if they are living Better ( Post MS Surgery ) , than what they were living Prior to this Surgery. If 60% have shown Improvement , then we are on to something , & need to prefect this system. The folk's that don't have ( MS ) , will Sit Back & wait , bacause it doesn't effect them Personally. Thank You , Robt. D. Miles

  15. Everything in health care has its risks, could be something as simple as an allergic reaction from medications, or heart surgery that only gives soo much of a percentage for survival…Why should this be treated any different? If it helps give people with MS a better life for however long that may be, and they are willing to take that risk, just like they make us sign off on those risks for major procedures in the hospitals, than let them live a better life!!!