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Mubarak supporters confront protesters in Cairo

More than 100 wounded in violent clashes


 

The day after President Hosni Mubarak announced he would not stand for reelection in Egypt’s upcoming elections, protesters clashed with Mubarak supporters in Cairo on Wedneday. More than 100 people were reportedly wounded when groups of pro-government supporters entered Tahrir square and both sides began throwing rocks and other debris at each other. Mubarak opponents accused the pro-government demonstrators of being paid off by Mubarak to provoke and disrupt the crowd. The government’s supporters, meanwhile, are calling the anti-government protesters “thugs” who have brought anarchy to a once stable nation. Opposition leader Mohamed ElBaradei has called for military intervention over fears the scene could “turn into a bloodbath.”

Al Jazeera English


 
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Mubarak supporters confront protesters in Cairo

  1. This could easily escalate to a civilian war. Edan Aharony

  2. This could easily escalate to a civilian war. Edan Aharony

  3. It's unreasonable for protesters to demand that Mubarak step down immediately.

    It will take months to introduce Suleiman and the new management to the torture-cell inmates, and Suleiman has to wait for his appointment on the advisory of the Knesset, and tighten up his liaison connections with MOSSAD.

    Haste makes waste. It takes time to repackage the same-old same-old. Besides, if Obama rushes Mubarak, he might find Egypt, et Middle-East al, will find another willing supporter of State-terror realpolitik, that doesn't make big speeches about freedom and democracy: Beijing.

  4. It's unreasonable for protesters to demand that Mubarak step down immediately.

    It will take months to introduce Suleiman and the new management to the torture-cell inmates, and Suleiman has to wait for his appointment on the advisory of the Knesset, and tighten up his liaison connections with MOSSAD.

    Haste makes waste. It takes time to repackage the same-old same-old. Besides, if Obama rushes Mubarak, he might find Egypt, et Middle-East al, will find another willing supporter of State-terror realpolitik, that doesn't make big speeches about freedom and democracy: Beijing.

    • I kind of question whether terrorism is supported by those Middle Easts and Asian dictators who cling on power (hopefully, I am wrong on this). They have more to gain by the continued survival of those Islamic extremists. Afterall, the continued support of the West for these dictators (instead of forcibly pushing for reforms and replacing them with democractic ones) is due to the western fears that Islamists might gain power if the hold of these dictators are weakened. Isn't it then to these dictators' advantage for the terrorists to flourish (to increase and strengthen those fears), to keep those Western support(financial and otherwise) continuing? More and more we see evidence of radicalization sponsored by governments like Saudi Arabia's Ministry of Education like the books for students which were exported to UK and who knows where else. Financial supports for terrorists came from countries that are suppose to be tightly controlled by these dictators. Radical Clerics /Imams and radical mosques are financed and imported to western countries thanks to Saudi Arabia. Recently, the Mubarak thugs (supporters) instigating these recent violent clashes of most of the time peaceful demonstrators are seen vocally as spouting anti american and western garbage/hateful messages (exactly the same as the terrorists) even going further in harassing foreigners and media. These most recent events in Egypt are strenghthening my suspicion that the terrorists receive under the table support from those who are suppose to be our allies in the Middle Easts (Much like Pakistan's Military – extra double face). I just hope that the replacements are really for democracy and not much of the same or even worse (reminds me of Iran). Islamic adherents all over the world should ask a critical question of Bin laden/Sickos Corporation, are they puppets or working secretly for these dictators whom many people wanted to replace? Can you imagine a religion being successfully hijacked by political ambitions of the mentally challenged and morally corrupt. No wonder those people do not want nor encourage their followers to develop critical thinking – it is easier to lead them by their noses (by blind obedience). After Egypt, next stop Saudi Arabia?

  5. I kind of question whether terrorism is supported by those Middle Easts and Asian dictators who cling on power (hopefully, I am wrong on this). They have more to gain by the continued survival of those Islamic extremists. Afterall, the continued support of the West for these dictators (instead of forcibly pushing for reforms and replacing them with democractic ones) is due to the western fears that Islamists might gain power if the hold of these dictators are weakened. Isn't it then to these dictators' advantage for the terrorists to flourish (to increase and strengthen those fears), to keep those Western support(financial and otherwise) continuing? More and more we see evidence of radicalization sponsored by governments like Saudi Arabia's Ministry of Education like the books for students which were exported to UK and who knows where else. Financial supports for terrorists came from countries that are suppose to be tightly controlled by these dictators. Radical Clerics /Imams and radical mosques are financed and imported to western countries thanks to Saudi Arabia. Recently, the Mubarak thugs (supporters) instigating these recent violent clashes of most of the time peaceful demonstrators are seen vocally as spouting anti american and western garbage/hateful messages (exactly the same as the terrorists) even going further in harassing foreigners and media. These most recent events in Egypt are strenghthening my suspicion that the terrorists receive under the table support from those who are suppose to be our allies in the Middle Easts (Much like Pakistan's Military – extra double face). I just hope that the replacements are really for democracy and not much of the same or even worse (reminds me of Iran). Islamic adherents all over the world should ask a critical question of Bin laden/Sickos Corporation, are they puppets or working secretly for these dictators whom many people wanted to replace? Can you imagine a religion being successfully hijacked by political ambitions of the mentally challenged and morally corrupt. No wonder those people do not want nor encourage their followers to develop critical thinking – it is easier to lead them by their noses (by blind obedience). After Egypt, next stop Saudi Arabia?

  6. Yes, it was quite interesting to see pro-Mobarak protesters decrying the US while at the same time the anti-Mobarak protesters protecting and sheltering foreigners. Not to mention the stories recently about reciprocal commitments, and actions, of cooperation and protection between Muslims, Coptic Christians, and atheists.

    And, still, you hear from western media / analysts repeated comments of fear about the Muslim Brotherhood. I wonder how condescending that sounds to Egyptians?

  7. As to Muslim Brotherhood, the suspicion on this group is quite justified. This group is playing 2 factions against each other. They did not initiate the revolt/protest, they came in later hoping to cash in. Egypt has many better choices, it does not have to contend between Mubarak and Muslim Brotherhood. Should that happen, there is a possibility that they might find themselves jumping from the frying pan into the fire – it happened in Iran, I hope it will not be so.

  8. As to Muslim Brotherhood, the suspicion on this group is quite justified. This group is playing 2 factions against each other. They did not initiate the revolt/protest, they came in later hoping to cash in. Egypt has many better choices, it does not have to contend between Mubarak and Muslim Brotherhood. Should that happen, there is a possibility that they might find themselves jumping from the frying pan into the fire – it happened in Iran, I hope it will not be so.

  9. As to Muslim Brotherhood, the suspicion on this group is quite justified. This group is playing 2 factions against each other. They did not initiate the revolt/protest, they came in later hoping to cash in. Egypt has many better choices, it does not have to contend between Mubarak and Muslim Brotherhood. Should that happen, there is a possibility that they might find themselves jumping from the frying pan into the fire – it happened in Iran, I hope it will not be so.

  10. As to Muslim Brotherhood, the suspicion on this group is quite justified. This group is playing 2 factions against each other. They did not initiate the revolt/protest, they came in later hoping to cash in. Egypt has many better choices, it does not have to contend between Mubarak and Muslim Brotherhood. Should that happen, there is a possibility that they might find themselves jumping from the frying pan into the fire – it happened in Iran, I hope it will not be so.

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