5

Near catastrophe for Canadian military

Heads of navy, army and air force were on plane that just missed a mid-air collision


 

The Toronto Star has reported that in April, Canada came close to losing nine of its most senior military leaders in the near-collision of a government Challenger jet and a commercial jetliner over British Columbia. In light of the incident, questions are being raised as to why the military allowed several military officials to travel together. “It is common sense not to have your key leaders together in one vehicle or one plane,” said Susan Gurley, executive director of the U.S.-based Association of Corporate Travel Executives. “Most global corporations have these very clear travel policies in place and they enforce them because they won’t want to be in the position where something happens and the company is rudderless.” But Canadian Forces do not have a policy to restrict the travel of senior leadership, a failing that exposes the military to serious risk in the event of an accident. One official said yesterday that the military does consider splitting up commanders when they travel abroad, but not in a “domestic, everyday-type context.” That could change, he said. Passengers on the jet included Vice-Admiral Drew Robertson, then head of the navy; Lt.-Gen. Angus Watt, head of the air force; and Lt.-Gen. Andrew Leslie, head of the army.

Toronto Star


 
Filed under:

Near catastrophe for Canadian military

  1. Not a near-catastrophe. http://www.avherald.com has no record of this incident, meaning the seriousness was quite low. It is normal for aircraft to stray closer than the multiple-miles-horizontal and 100-feet-vertical limits, and the story says nothing about horizontal separation. The planes could have been five miles apart and still had alarms go off.

    It shouldn't be ignored, but a headline like "near-catastrophe" here and "near-disaster" from the Star might be a bit much.

  2. Not a near-catastrophe. http://www.avherald.com has no record of this incident, meaning the seriousness was quite low. It is normal for aircraft to stray closer than the multiple-miles-horizontal and 100-feet-vertical limits, and the story says nothing about horizontal separation. The planes could have been five miles apart and still had alarms go off.

    It shouldn't be ignored, but a headline like "near-catastrophe" here and "near-disaster" from the Star might be a bit much.

    • Oops — 1000-feel-vertical, sorry about that. I blame the new keyboard.

  3. Canada is in a shooting war with an elusive non-traditional secretive enemy with global reach. I don't care whether there was a close near-miss, a distant near-miss, or no near-miss at all. To have NINE senior members of our armed forces in the same place at the same time anywhere on Earth should have people fired, demoted, reprimanded, whatever. That is incredible. If it happens a second time the Minister should be signing the resignation letter.

  4. Once again, it all comes back to standard Canadian cheapness.

    "THEY TAKE THEIR OWN PLANES? WHY NOT PUT THEM ALL ON THE SAME COACH FLIGHT, LIKE THE REST OF US?"
    -Canadian Voter.

Sign in to comment.