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PM Harper to attend Lac-Megantic memorial mass


 

Prime Minister Stephen Harper will be among the dignitaries at tomorrow’s memorial service for victims of the Lac-Megantic disaster.

The prime minister and Gov. Gen. David Johnston will be there with their spouses, as will Quebec Premier Pauline Marois and Maine Gov. Paul LePage.

The service will be held at 11 a.m. at Ste-Agnes Church.

The mass will be presided over by Luc Cyr, the archbishop of Sherbrooke.

Organizers have reserved 700 places in the 1,000-seat church for loved ones of the derailment victims. Remaining pew spots in the church have been set aside for locals, volunteers and dignitaries.

Two big-screen TVs will be set up outside the church and will broadcast the ceremony live.

An estimated 47 people were killed in the explosive July 6 train derailment, an event that has sparked several lawsuits, a police criminal investigation and a probe by federal transportation-safety officials.

The federal government has promised $60 million for emergency assistance and longer-term reconstruction help for the town. It has also revamped some rules on train transport, following the advice of the federal Transportation Safety Board.

It will be Harper’s second visit to Lac-Megantic since the tragedy. In his first visit, he compared the devastated downtown to a “war zone.”


 

PM Harper to attend Lac-Megantic memorial mass

  1. Let’s hope he doesn’t pocket the host this time.

    • Hopefully his aide has briefed him, because he is protestant, that he cannot take the host, but can simply ask for a blessing which would be given.

      • He can take it, but he has to eat it not stuff it in his pocket. Better to remain seated and avoid the whole thing.

        • As a non Catholic he cannot take the Host.

          • I have done so. Chance for a convert? You betcha.

          • Then you’d most welcome to come to the faith Emily.

          • I should have mentioned that was years ago, when I was high anglican

          • Never to late to become RC

          • Bob it was too late in the 12th century

          • 12th century? You really are old aren’t you.

          • LOL no, but the church certainly is.

  2. Claude Mongeau, CN chief executive, warned the unusual sequence of
    events that led to the disaster in the Quebec town earlier this month
    has yet to be determined.

    “We don’t know at this point exactly what happened,” Mr Mongeau said
    on a conference call Monday. “Suffice it to say, it’s much more
    complicated than just finding out how many handbrakes were set.”

    We don’t know at this point exactly what happened

    He said there were many questions remaining, including what caused
    the fire in the locomotive, why the air in the independent brakes let
    out in minutes not hours, and why the required reset safety control did
    not play a role in stopping the train.

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