Pope justifies use of condoms to help stop spread of AIDS - Macleans.ca
 

Pope justifies use of condoms to help stop spread of AIDS

Vatican’s first exception to policy banning contraceptives


 

Condom use can be justified in some cases to help stop the spread of AIDS, Pope Benedict XVI has said, marking the Vatican’s first exception to its policy banning contraceptives. The statements were made in interviews with a German journalist to address some criticisms of his papacy. The Pope’s statement was limited; he didn’t approve of their use, or suggest the Roman Catholic Church was changing its stance prohibiting birth control. The one example he cited in which condom use might be appropriate was by male prostitutes. Even so, observers call the statement a real change for the Pope, who was criticized last year when he said condoms didn’t help prevent the spread of AIDS while en route to Africa, where the disease represents a health crisis.

New York Times


 
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Pope justifies use of condoms to help stop spread of AIDS

  1. This seems quite insignificant to the reality-based, by whom I mean those who understand that condoms can contain disease and improve the ability of individuals and families to choose their path, even if you don't like the idea. But as Andrew Sullivan points out, it's actually a huge sea change that just made its first tiny movement.

    And so Pandora's box opens. If it represents a "moralization" when a male prostitute wears a condom, would it be another step in his moralization to give up prostitution for a non-mercenary sexual and emotional relationship? In such a relationship, would it be more moral for such a man to disclose his HIV status or not? If he does, would it not be more moral for him to wear a condom in sex than not?

    We all know the answer to these questions. They're obvious. The new thing here is that the Church has stumbled backward into acknowledging that gay men exist, that within our lives as gay men, there are constant gradations of moral choices; and so Catholic teaching must apply to us in the gray areas of moral and sexual choices and nuances. Until now, no such guidance was really provided except general prohibition: y'all be celibate, and if you're miserable and alone, so was Jesus on the cross. Now, by conceding one small gradation of moral life, that between a rubbered prostitute and a bareback prostitute, the Pope has moved from his arid abstractions to real morality that might be able to guide real people.

    Full post: http://andrewsullivan.theatlantic.com/the_daily_d

  2. This seems quite insignificant to the reality-based, by whom I mean those who understand that condoms can contain disease and improve the ability of individuals and families to choose their path, even if you don't like the idea. But as Andrew Sullivan points out, it's actually a huge sea change that just made its first tiny movement.

    And so Pandora's box opens. If it represents a "moralization" when a male prostitute wears a condom, would it be another step in his moralization to give up prostitution for a non-mercenary sexual and emotional relationship? In such a relationship, would it be more moral for such a man to disclose his HIV status or not? If he does, would it not be more moral for him to wear a condom in sex than not?

    We all know the answer to these questions. They're obvious. The new thing here is that the Church has stumbled backward into acknowledging that gay men exist, that within our lives as gay men, there are constant gradations of moral choices; and so Catholic teaching must apply to us in the gray areas of moral and sexual choices and nuances. Until now, no such guidance was really provided except general prohibition: y'all be celibate, and if you're miserable and alone, so was Jesus on the cross. Now, by conceding one small gradation of moral life, that between a rubbered prostitute and a bareback prostitute, the Pope has moved from his arid abstractions to real morality that might be able to guide real people.

    Full post: http://andrewsullivan.theatlantic.com/the_daily_d

  3. How can men who " "abstain" " from sex or reproductive side of life be a source of wisdom on this and any reproductive control issues?

  4. How can men who " "abstain" " from sex or reproductive side of life be a source of wisdom on this and any reproductive control issues?

  5. Wow…the times they are a changin'…

    First the Vatican agrees to baptize space aliens (should they show up)…now, condoms aren't made in hell.

    It's getting hard to know what I am allowed to do vs what will score me eternal damnation…..can the Pope publish a Wiki perhaps?

    Source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2010/sep/17/pop

  6. Wow…the times they are a changin'…

    First the Vatican agrees to baptize space aliens (should they show up)…now, condoms aren't made in hell.

    It's getting hard to know what I am allowed to do vs what will score me eternal damnation…..can the Pope publish a Wiki perhaps?

    Source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2010/sep/17/pop

  7. About god damned time.

  8. About god damned time.