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RCMP commissioner will step down in July

William Elliot faced heavy criticism from top brass


 

William Elliot, the beleaguered RCMP commissioner who became the first civilian chief of the force in 2007, announced on Friday that he will step down next July. Complaints began to surface in July of last year from RCMP officers who said that Elliot was abrasive, bullying and difficult to work with. Former CSIS director Reid Morden was later hired for $28,000 to produce a “workplace assessment” of the force. Many of Elliot’s critics were replaced, such as Deputy Commissioner Raf Souccar. CTV News’ Don Martin expressed surprise at Elliot’s resignation, saying “he seemed to have won,” while noting that Elliot himself had previously stated that “the mood of the senior leadership of the RCMP is very positive.” Liberal public safety critic Mark Holland says that with Elliot’s resignation, it is an opportune time to reform the RCMP.

CTV News


 
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RCMP commissioner will step down in July

  1. Perhaps Liberal Senator Colin Kenny (the oft-quoted and copiously opinionated "expert" on the RCMP) should be selected? He knows the political systems inside-out and he's an "expert" on the RCMP who has authored reports on how to fix the malaise… and he is unlikely to be a lapdog and apologist for the Conservatives…

  2. Perhaps Liberal Senator Colin Kenny (the oft-quoted and copiously opinionated "expert" on the RCMP) should be selected? He knows the political systems inside-out and he's an "expert" on the RCMP who has authored reports on how to fix the malaise… and he is unlikely to be a lapdog and apologist for the Conservatives…

  3. "RCMP commissioner will step down "
    Thank goodness. The last two commissioners were disasters. Elliot did nothing to improve the situation. However a commissioner from inside the force may not be a good idea. He may have bias for the RCMP and not place the peoples' interests in priority.

  4. "RCMP commissioner will step down "
    Thank goodness. The last two commissioners were disasters. Elliot did nothing to improve the situation. However a commissioner from inside the force may not be a good idea. He may have bias for the RCMP and not place the peoples' interests in priority.

    • Elliott should not have been hired in the first place. Aside from not being qualified to manage such
      a complex organization, his temper tantrums and hurtful demeanor to all levels of staff could have been determined
      prior to his RCMP appointment. He, like for Zaccardelli, leaves in disgrace with a poor record.

  5. Elliott should not have been hired in the first place. Aside from not being qualified to manage such
    a complex organization, his temper tantrums and hurtful demeanor to all levels of staff could have been determined
    prior to his RCMP appointment. He, like for Zaccardelli, leaves in disgrace with a poor record.

  6. Speaking of National Security, here is another related item.

    Sent: Mon, January 17, 2011 4:30:37 AM
    Subject: CSIS involvement in politics

    January 2011

    Dear Senator:

    Would it affect your vote if you learned that the Rt. Hon. Stephen Harper was a CSIS operative in the late 1980s and early 1990s?

    This interesting-but-not-scandalous information (as once described by Jeff Sallot, a noted journalist and now teaching media at Carleton University) has been deemed by the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) as an item of ‘national security,' and I, in turn, was deemed as “prejudicial to the safety and interests of the [Canadian] state” under the Security of Information Act (SOIA). My career was ruined as a result.

    So, congratulations… you are now privy to a national-security secret.

    If, after a moment of contemplation, you find something fishy about this ‘secret,' as if Canada's security wouldn't change one iota if it were broadcast around the world, you are privy to what this package is really about: the lack of judgment by CSIS, their dirty tricks, harassment and above all, their denial of basic justice to innocent Canadians.

    The Liberal Party of Canada is aware of this information, but according to a letter from Michael Ignatieff's office (copied to the Evidence directory), the Liberals are not interested in this issue. The reasons for the Liberal's lack of interest may include the fact that CSIS may have also protected a Liberal Prime Minister from another ‘national security secret' – i.e., a brief affair with a Peterborough woman in or around 2005 – by harassing her to an extreme degree. Read the article about her ordeal at the hands of CSIS in the Evidence directory (#23a and b).

    This package is a book proposal seeking a publisher. Four chapters and an introduction tentatively entitled Life Under CSIS Rule are included, as well as a book synopsis and letter to a prospective literary agent. A series of magazine articles are also feasible, as is internet publication. The Gangstalker Directory contains “About Gangstalkers” to explain the role of ‘gangstalkers' – simply, a network of louts recruited to harass a whistleblower – including some photos of them in action. The phenomenon of gangstalking has been developed very well at the website, gangstalkingworld.com, to which I refer the reader. In my case, CSIS has rented apartments in my neighbourhood to house them, so I enclose some photos of those houses as well.

    My resume and a photograph of my wife and I are included to identify us, as well as a Contact sheet to warn of the difficulties of communication when you are under CSIS investigation. My proposed book isn't as important as the country. If you don't want my experiences in Life Under CSIS Rule to be a regular occurrence in Canada, all under the excuse of ‘national security,' please pass my story along. Please accept my legal permission to do so.

    Sincerely,

    Gareth Llewellyn

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