RCMP to release details about investigation into missing and murdered women

SPENCES BRIDGE, B.C. – Madeline Lanaro says she already knows today’s police announcement into the investigation of 18 missing and murdered women and girls in British Columbia won’t shed any new light into her daughter’s death.

SPENCES BRIDGE, B.C. – Madeline Lanaro says she already knows today’s police announcement into the investigation of 18 missing and murdered women and girls in British Columbia won’t shed any new light into her daughter’s death.

Lanaro, the mother of Monica Jack who was found dead in 1978, said she was informed by the RCMP last week that there would be an announcement about the investigation today.

“He said that the announcement wouldn’t have anything to do about my daughter,” said Lanaro, during an interview Monday. “It was about another family.”

So far, little is known about today’s news conference, only that the RCMP have said it relates to an investigation dubbed E-Pana.

That probe was launched in 2006 to investigate cases of missing and murdered women in the province’s north and central regions.

Those cases include Highway 16, a notorious stretch of road between Prince Rupert and Prince George that’s been nicknamed the “Highway of Tears” because of disappearances in the area.

A news release stated the RCMP’s news conference will feature investigators, a family member and an official from the United States.

Eighteen girls or women have disappeared or been murdered along the Highway of Tears over the past 20 years.

Police also plan to issue a plea for information from people in British Columbia and the United States.

Sally Gibson, whose niece Lana Derrick went missing in 1995 and has acted as a family spokeswoman, said she was shocked to learn there would be an announcement today, after listening to a broadcasted media report.

“My heart was beating down by my toes at that part,” she said, noting she’s in the dark about the announcement.

She said police have not been in contact with her.

Meantime, Lanaro said while she knows police have been working on the case and have been trying new things, the death of her daughter never escapes her.

In fact, Lanaro said she has to keep busy to keep sane.

“It’s always there everyday,” she said.




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