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Sarkozy’s mixed message

French Muslims are “citizens like any other” but must avoid religious “ostentation or provocation”


 

The French president’s call, in a statement published by Le Monde newspaper, reflected concern that a government-sponsored debate on France’s “national identity,” seemed to be contributing to expressions of anti-Muslim sentiment and generating resentment among Muslim citizens and immigrants. “I will combat any form of discrimination,” Sarkozy said, but added he also wanted to tell Muslims “that in our country, where Christian civilization has left such a deep trace, where republican values are an integral part of our national identity, everything that could be taken as a challenge to this heritage and its values would condemn to failure the necessary inauguration of a French Islam.” Sarkozy said he understood the fears of many native French at the growing visibility of Muslims. France has Europe’s largest Muslim population, estimated at well over five million. That, he said, is what led him to propose the national-identity debate managed by Eric Besson, the minister of immigration, integration and national identity. “This muffled threat felt by so many people in our old European nations, rightly or wrongly, weighs on their identity,” Sarkozy added. “We must all speak about this together, out of fear that, if it is kept hidden, this sentiment could end up nourishing a terrible rancor.” Some political commentators see Sarkozy’s entry into the controversy against the background of regional assembly elections in March, in which the governing coalition is seeking to make inroads into provincial Socialist Party strongholds. The extreme-right National Front, which could drain votes from Sarkozy’s party, is openly calling for a Swiss-style decision to ban minarets, towers beside mosques from which Muslims are called to prayer.

Washington Post


 
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Sarkozy’s mixed message

  1. “I will combat any form of discrimination,” Sarkozy said… Sarkozy later clarified, any but his own.

    • I agree. If one was going to be concerned about ones "Christian heritage" and "republican values" one should have been concerned about it before allowing the influx of a large Muslim population. Now that they are here, and they were promised religious freedom, the state should actually live up to their promises.

      • France has always had strong distiction between church and state they continue to do so. Muslims should build there own successful and thriving nation in whatever country they came from or join in the with the rest of their chosen countries citizens. No matter what your religion is you should be grateful that you were able to chose to be accepted into a new country and show some gratitude. Not spend your new found wealth of freedon and money to change your new home to be more like your old. Obviously the old one wasn't so great or you would dtill be there.

  2. The leading force for violence today is Islam. Not "Radical Islam", Islam pure and simple. It's not a religion, it's an ideology of perpetual war against non-Muslims. It's the closest thing in the world today to the NAZI ideology . Violence, mayhem, and when circumstances permit, oppression of non-Muslims are not isolated incidents, it's the whole point of Islam. If there was such a thing as "Moderate Islam", there would be at least a few majority-Muslim nations with a reasonable standard of living as well as democracy and human rights. There are none.

    We all know how the NAZI's of the 20th century had numerous collaborators who helped them achieve their goals. The collaborators of today are political, educational, social and religious leaders who are always making excuses for Islam and singing the praises of "diversity", knowing full well that Muslims don't tolerate any diversity at all when in power. They then go on to stress the great "need" we have for even more immigration, knowing full well that this increased Al-Qaeda's recruiting base every year.

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