Sask government to go after Thatcher - Macleans.ca
 

Sask government to go after Thatcher

Justice minister confirms plans to seize money made from convicted killer’s book


 

Justice Minister Don Morgan has confirmed the Saskatchewan government will attempt to seize money made from former provincial cabinet minister Colin Thatcher’s book, Final Appeal: The Anatomy of a Frame, published earlier this month and recently excerpted in Maclean’s, the Saskatoon StarPhoenix reports. Thatcher, convicted in the murder of his ex-wife JoAnne Wilson in 1983, spent 22 years in prison but has consistently maintained his innocence. Morgan told reporters his officials have examined the book and would soon dispatch letters to Thatcher and his publisher, Toronto-based ECW Press, seeking monies generated from its sale. “If co-operation isn’t forthcoming, then they would make an application to the Court of Queen’s Bench,” Morgan said.

The Star Phoenix


 
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Sask government to go after Thatcher

  1. Is this profit from crime? The publisher says he is not retelling the story of his conviction, so apparently not. Has he done his time? Yes.

    Maybe this is more about a government making a political move rather than a principled one.

  2. This guy is either a psychopath….or he's telling the truth. He's a politician. Need we say more!

  3. What worse than making money off a murderer? Using legislation to take it for yourself.

    Government a moral beacon in our society.

  4. What's worse than witnessing someone make money off a murder? Using legislation to take it for yourself.

    Government a moral beacon in our society.

  5. This is very simalar to the US GOP going after the Democrats, they just do not know when to quit.

  6. As I commented elsewhere, such legislation, if enacted, would also prevent Steven Truscott from earning any proceeds from the sale of his story, should he choose to publish it. Both Thatcher and Truscott, in the eyes of the law, are convicted murderers who have served their sentences. The difference is that, in hindsight, Truscott's conviction was almost certainly a tragic miscarriage of justice, while Thatcher's conviction still appears solid.

    However, the application of the law will not and cannot recognize such subtle differences. If "convicted murderers" are not allowed to benefit from telling their story, then it will apply to both Thatcher and Truscott. That isn't acceptable. Better to allow a thousand creeps to publish than prevent one innocent man from doing so.