Syria bans full-face Islamic veils at universities - Macleans.ca
 

Syria bans full-face Islamic veils at universities

Education minister says veils conflict with academic values


 

Syria’s education minister has banned female students from wearing the full-face veil at universities, saying the practice conflicts with academic values and traditions. Islamic head coverings have become increasingly popular in Syria in recent years, according to the BBC. In 2009, Egypt’s foremost cleric courted controversy when he banned students from wearing the full-face veil at a university. France’s lower house of parliament recently voted to ban the full-face veil in all public places.

BBC News


 
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Syria bans full-face Islamic veils at universities

  1. I certainly don't want debate on the Israeli-Palestinian question to be more restricted here than in Israel.

    Should I want women to be freer to wear a niqab here than in Syria?

    Hmmmm … something to think about.

  2. This thing is becoming a trend.

  3. Soon the spineless whimps in Ottawa will be the last ones on earth to allow the veil.

  4. So, even an Islam country knows this has nothing to do with religion but ideology?

  5. It's time for our political leaders in Canada to do the same thing, instead of kissing the feet of Radical Islamic leaders who are here to spread their ideology of hate and violence and will not rest until they form a majority voting block and can make any laws they want (so goodbye to the charter of rights and freedoms).

    Radical Islam, the thing the makes the Middle East a living hell is infiltrating Canada every day through immigration while collaborator politicians do all they can to keep the immigration pipeline open.

    A good source of information about Radical Islamic infiltration is the website, http://www.jihadwatch.org

  6. That's interesting. it wasn't long ago that the Toronto Star's resident Islamist, Haroon Siddiqui, was flapping his wings like a threatened turkey vulture regarding Quebec's decision to ban the veil at public institutions. maybe the Toronto Star, will send Haroon to Syria, to talk some sense into their liberal heads.

  7. 30 – 40 years ago it would have been rare to see the full veil even in the middle east, women wear it now due to violence from Muslim men if they don't. It's not a religious thing, it's cultural, some non-muslim women in Arab countries wear the veil, and even in France real french women have taken to wearing the veil so they won't get attacked by muslim men in the muslim owned areas of the country. Full covering niqabs, hijabs or whatever the uncivilized want to call them are as religious as Scottish Kilts.

    • I am highly suspicious of your claim.

    • LOL americans are really brainwashed
      amazing
      But now it's clear if a muslim want to wear the niqab he can come to the US

  8. The problem with veils is that they inhibit or retard communication. Hiding of the speakers face not only hides their emotional/facial expression but also takes away the assistance of lip reading that many of us do subconsciously when speaking to others in public settings. Both points would make university learning more difficult and may have driven the decision as much as anything.

    • It's a pretty minor inconvenience which actually doesn't arise that much (most university is listening to lectures) and can be overcome pretty easily by speaking a little louder when necessary. It's difficult to see how its worth overriding religious freedom for.

      • Religion? Even Imams agree that this has nothing to do with the Koran at all. Incovenience? Remember those idiots that trash Toronto, they are wearing mask, so they can't be identified. It has something to do with security. I believe it is time to teach radical muslim men to strengthen their character, and not to blame their weakness on their women. What a bunch of pathetic and whining men are those radical muslims.

        • Its not because of the identity it just said that in the quran. You guys wear like cross necklaces and shirts. So what? we cant wear our niqabs? its not like we have weapons. we do it cuz of our religion! If you call us radical or whiny muslims wait until you die

      • Often thirty or more other students are involved. Do their rights not matter because they a majority and get lumped together? Those are individuals whose learning maybe stunted or made more difficult because of one individual who choses not to participate on even ground.

  9. Certainly a bit ironic. I'm against it of course because I'm big on religious freedoms.

    But if, as some have suggested, wearing a head covering is part of a barbaric backwards practice that the best among us would not tolerate, keeping these people away from university is counterproductive.

    • Religious freedom? You are big in pride. You can not accept that you might be wrong in this instance. Religious freedom? Syria is an Islam country, so learn well.

    • Call it what you want but it's a choice.

  10. "Quite frankly, MPs, there's a £160bn debt; shouldn't they be busier worrying about what they're going to do about that, than a small piece of cloth that a few women choose to wear?" Catherine Heseltine on the ban of the niqab

    How does it hurt anybody else if a woman chooses to wear a small piece of cloth across her face?

    surely this says it all, if a woman chooses to wear the niqaab how does it affect those around her if it is her personal choice. Those supporting the ban only wish to hear the opinion of the minority of women who may be forced to wear the hijab/niqaab but not of those who wear it out of choice and personal freedom.

    to those above who dispute that the hijab and the niqaab is not religious but cultural, I suggest you go educate yourselves because it seems you are as brainwashed by the media as they come. Peace.

    • You are still free to wear it in your own house, mosque, and private places. You can even go to Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Middle East countries to wear them. We are after all have freedom to travel. We need to identify the faces behind the veil for security reasons.