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The Gambler


 

Give John McCain credit: He is not afraid of taking risks. We all know about his war record and the risks he took when in combat. In politics, we have seen a similar spirit, willing to go against the grain and often not always calculating the potential impact. He ran against the Republican establishment in 2000, only to suffer a crushing defeat at the hands of George W. Bush. At 72, and after having survived four battles against cancer, he throws his hat in the ring against all odds. At this time last year, we were writing McCain’s political obituary. Here again, the gamble paid off.

Until early September, he trailed Barack Obama in the polls, but he has recently taken a lead in most polls conducted since the Republican convention. Underestimating him is clearly the most risky of all ventures for any opponent. His recent nomination of Sarah Palin is very much in character and, for the past ten days, it has been conceivable that he may once again fool the pundits.

McCain is impulsive and instinctive. He gambled on Sarah Palin’s image as a maverick and a reformer, and felt he needed to choose her in order to change the course of the campaign. From an experience versus change election, we now have an election about what kind of change America wants and needs. And the race is a dead heat .

The Palin choice, however, does reveal a certain cynicism toward the voter. It is now becoming evident that Sarah Palin was not completely vetted. The McCain camp had certainly evaluated her political experience and her overall philosophy about government. What it failed to do was evaluate her ability to become president should tragedy strike. Her recent interview on ABC demonstrated an appalling lack of knowledge on crucial issues affecting America’s future. If Americans are discontented and discouraged about the direction of their country, a lot of that has to do with the war in Iraq and the faltering economy. The Bush doctrine created the war, yet she could not define the contents of the doctrine. The economy has resulted in high unemployment, skyrocketing energy prices, record deficits, Wall Street shockwaves and failures, and a debt of over $1-trillion. In the meantime, Bush continues his policy of tax cuts for the rich that can only add to the deficit, a policy now supported by John McCain.

McCain may be a gambler and that has been a trademark of his, but is America better for it? John McCain is an admirable patriot and a man respected across the political spectrum; however, his choice on this important matter makes me wonder whether winning at all costs is now becoming the measure of the man. He may yet win this gamble, but at what cost to the country he professes to love. McCain once said Obama was ready to lose a war to win an election. That was over the top, but is McCain willing to sacrifice his integrity, his most endearing quality as a public figure, to win an election?


 

The Gambler

  1. John, do you think you could have crammed in any more democratic talking points in that post?

  2. John, do you think you could have crammed in any more democratic talking points in that post?

    Usual Conservative personal attack. Don’t deal with the issues, just attack.

    I really don’t know why Maclean is entertaining trolls like Jarrid.

  3. Mr. Parisella has been clear since day one that he thinks Obama is the Man. Nothing new there.

    But It’s my understanding that the Palin choice was forced on McCain. He wanted Lieberman or Ridge but it was felt that a number of delegations would walk if he made either of those choices. If he wanted peace in the kingdom he could take either Palin or Palin. Wrong?

  4. Sisyphus (spelled it right this time)

    But It’s my understanding that the Clinton choice was forced on Obama. He wanted Biden or Nunn but it was felt that a number of delegations would walk if he made either of those choices. If he wanted peace in the kingdom he could take either Clinton or Clinton. Wrong?

  5. “Her recent interview on ABC demonstrated an appalling lack of knowledge on crucial issues affecting America’s future.”

    Would like to know what you are thinking of because her foreign affair positions are awfully similar to Obama’s. And Bush Doctrine is an incoherent mess, so it’s no surprise she didn’t know exactly what it was.

    And how is it clear that she wasn’t vetted? McCain campaign first started to vet her in February, they just kept it a secret. If Liberal msm doesn’t know about something, does that mean it didn’t happen?

    “The economy has resulted in high unemployment, skyrocketing energy prices, record deficits, Wall Street shockwaves and failures, and a debt of over $1-trillion.”

    Congress is in control of economic matters, not the president. I think the Fannie/Freddie example will be nice contrast for McCain.

    “For years I have been concerned about the regulatory structure that governs Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac–known as Government-sponsored entities or GSEs–and the sheer magnitude of these companies and the role they play in the housing market … If Congress does not act, American taxpayers will continue to be exposed to the enormous risk that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac pose to the housing market, the overall financial system, and the economy as a whole.” John McCain, 2006

    “John Kerry reportedly raked in $111,000 in campaign contributions between 1998 and 2008 from lobbyists tied to Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae, second only to Sen. Chris Dodd, a Connecticut Democrat and chairman of the Senate Banking Committee. Obama ranked third, according to opensecrets.org, accepting more than $105,000 in contributions during his four years in the Senate.”

  6. Didn’t I hear somewhere recently that Obama has waffled on rolling back the tax cuts for the rich? I think it was in a interview with George Stephanopolis (sp?).

    I say we have Obama vs. Palin in a Jeopardy-style foreign policy knowledge contest.

  7. JWL:

    Palin said the regulators were “asleep at the switch,” and that McCain, with her help imaginably, would “put an end to the mismanagement and abuses.” So she now wants more government intervention in the markets?

    Well she did go on to say :” “We’re going to reform the way Wall Street does business and stop the golden parachutes for CEOs who betray the public trust.” Okay, so the government is going to regulate more now.

    No wait, then sounding very Reaganian , she stated: ““I reminded people there that government is not always the answer; in fact, often, government is the problem,” Okay, so less government regulation.

    Maybe we should ask Mrs. Palin to clear this up. But we can’t. She won’t take questions from the press. Too bad. I’d also like to ask why she keeps insisting she said “thanks, but no thanks” to the bridge to nowhere..” when she clearly supported it during her campaign for the governorship. I should know. I was there on business during the campaign.

  8. STEVE M:

    My money is on Obama. Bet he at least knows what the Bush doctrine is. Also, he has actually been Iraq. Palin said she had, but she hadn’t. Well, Track is there now. So she must be an expert now, right?

  9. I don’t know, Sandy. From what I’ve read (both from conservatives and liberals), there have been multiple “Bush Doctrines” and I’m not even sure Gibson got it right.

    Secondly, Palin went to visit the troops (granted in Kuwait) long before she was a figure in the presidential election. Obama went there as a campaign stop and because he was shamed into it by McCain.

  10. So her foreign policy experience is visiting in the troops in Kuwait 17 years ago? Campaign stop perhaps, but my money is still on Obama. In fact, I bet Palin couldn’t even point out on a map where all 3 countries of the “Axis of Evil” are located.

    As much as Obama comes across as arrogant, Palin comes across as ignorant.

  11. Only now evident? It was clear within a day they picked her only because she believes in God, and is a woman politician.

  12. Sandy Moore

    Palin was in Kuwait last year to visit the Alaska National Guard unit who were taking a break from fighting in Iraq.

  13. I stand corrected. Still not sure how this means she has more foreign policy experience than Obama…

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