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The Hon. Member from Millhaven


 

So if it was up to prisoners and soldiers and diplomats, Stephen Harper would have a massive majority of about 205 seats. That’s according an analysis of special (absentee) ballots from the last election by Glen McGregor. Here’s the part I loved:

For voters in jail, Elections Canada assigns their vote to the riding they lived in before incarceration. If they don’t have one, their vote is assigned to the address of their spouse or or other family member they would be living with. If family cannot be located, Elections Canada counts the ballot in the riding where they were arrested.

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The Hon. Member from Millhaven

  1. From the article: “It is believed, however, that voters in uniform generally tend to be more conservative, while those in jail skew to the left.”

    The Coalitionists, the Liberals, the NDP and the Bloc, are all on the same page when it comes to mollycoddling criminals. It follows that those in jail would be avid supporters.

    It’s a good thing that the Supreme Court bent over backwards to make sure that hardened criminals who, by their actions, showed such contempt for our laws to earn a federal sentence, are able, through their vote, to participate in the law-making process by choosing their lawmakers. Makes perfect sense.

    • Jarrid, this statement: “It is believed, however, that voters in uniform generally tend to be more conservative, while those in jail skew to the left.” is not a scientific finding, and thus not a good premise on which to base a bilious rant.

      Honestly, crime rates have gone down, incarceration rates in Canada remain within the norm for civilised societies and still the perpetually aggrieved need to vilify non-Conservatives.

    • From the article: “It is believed, however, that voters in uniform generally tend to be more conservative, while those in jail skew to the left.”

      Yes, that was a nice sleight of hand trick the way they pitted one party against 4. So if 44% of soldiers voted for the Conservatives while 56% of them voted for one of the other parties it means, according to them, that soldiers generally tend to be more conservative. On the other hand if 44% of those in jail voted for the Conservatives while 56% voted for one of the other parties it means, according to them, that those in jail skew to the left.

      • That might be the thinking behind that statement, but given the lack of evidence, I’d simply characterise it as bullshit from a CanWest “journalist.” The usual trick, highlighted in OutFoxed, where a “journalist” establishes a premise with “some people say.”

        • My favourite opening is ” Studies show “. It renders all argument as futile.

          • If you watch a lot of the moderators of panel discussions, you’ll note that they don’t even allow anyone to pose the perfectly reasonable question “Which people say? Which studies? Believed by whom?” since they’re pressed for time and they know that it’ll take forever for it to be revealed that the person making that assertion is likely bullshitting.

            It’s such a capitulation. It’s why I don’t bother much with television news.

  2. Prisoners are generally believed by whom to be ‘left’ leaning, Canwest?

    No wonder you’re trading at like 2 cents a share?

    • Question for you.

      If you were a criminal, would you rather have a party that wants to hand out life terms to 14 year olds in charge of penal system or a party that thinks the root causes of why you did what you did are important to understand and factor in to your sentencing?

      • It may be more complicated than that. I remember reading somewhere when the neo-cons were on their latest deny-voting-rights-to-those incarcerated rants that prisoners were actually likely to support the ‘tough on crime’ crowd. Something about each individual prisoner seeing the slimy crowd around him/her and thinking “these people need to be locked up forever” while at some subconcsious level beleiving themselves to be above the rest of them. But I’ll stop there because my psychological analyses pale compared to my political analyses )lol)

        • This could very well be. Furthermore, the lack of education and violent disposition of inmates, plus the presence and influence of religious groups in prisons, are other factors which could indicate a strong conservative disposition.

        • Interesting. I agree that people do behave in mysterious ways.

      • If you were a criminal, would you rather have a party that wants to hand out life terms to 14 year olds in charge of penal system or a party that thinks the root causes of why you did what you did are important to understand and factor in to your sentencing?

        The fate of convicted and incarcerated criminals is usual pretty much set. I doubt they really believe their own vote is going to change anything for them personally, one way or the other. And convicted criminals are usually not the type of people who care too much about the welfare of others.

      • Well, jwl, if I were a criminal ( and in the blogosphere who really knows .. I may be … so may you ) I’d probably be blessed with poor impulse control and thereby be subject to the knee-jerk reactions that most conservatives seem be blessed with.

        Or I might be fully seized with the entrepreneurial spirit but feel the taking of short cuts is warranted because criminal law is just unacceptable layers of red tape getting in my way.

        Just another view.

    • Of course this entire argument rests on the unproven assumption that the votes of all criminals (and how many vote?) are primarily influenced by their position as convicted and incarcerated criminals.

      Could their votes possibly be determined by other factors? Such as, If they are married or have children; How old they are; How educated they are; What jobs, if any, they held before being incarcerated; what region of the country they lived in before being incarcerated; general political ideology; you know… all those things that OTHER people base their votes on?

  3. When I left the military I started hanging out with bikers. From my experience, the authority structures of the two organizations are similar and the image of power, in both cases, ultimately links to the idea that power involves the use of violence. I can certainly see how there would be some ideological overlap between the two groups, convicts and members of the military.

  4. As Hannah Arendt argues, there are two forms of authority (and for the purposes of our conversation, we could say there are two forms of power). The first form measures itself by how many it subjugates/dominates/controls. The second form measures itself by how the humber of those who are enlisted/inspired to join in common cause. I would argue that it is this emphasis on this first image of authority and power that is shared to a certain extent between biker gangs and the armed forces of Canada. These sorts of ideas, it could be argued, are often important in as much as they inform our aesthetic of power and authority, and in as much as they inform our ideological leanings.

  5. um please replace ‘how the humber’ with ‘the number’. :/

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