Violence breaks out in Athens - Macleans.ca
 

Violence breaks out in Athens

General strike turns ugly as protesters clash with police


 

More than 30,000 people descended into the streets of Athens during a general strike Thursday to protest the wide-ranging spending cuts announced by the Greek government. Things quickly turned ugly, with masked protesters attacking riot police, who responded with stun grenades and tear gas. The strike was the third in just over a month and forced the closure of the country’s airports, government offices, hospitals and schools. Greek officials announced two weeks ago they would be slashing public spending by over $65 billion in a bid to curtail the country’s debt problems. “They are trying to make workers pay the price for this crisis,” said Yiannis Panagopoulos, leader of Greece’s largest union, the GSEE.

CBC News


 
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Violence breaks out in Athens

  1. Hey, ya bunch of stupids, your country's bankrupt. What the hell else do you want them to do? The EU isn't going to bail you out forever.

    Seriously, what is wrong with people?

  2. In between taking afternoon naps, shaving their backs and the rioting, does any work get done in Greece?

  3. "They are trying to make workers pay the price for this crisis,” said Yiannis Panagopoulos, leader of Greece's largest union, the GSEE.

    Just who exactly does he think could (or should) otherwise pay for the crisis? People who don't work??

    • Perhaps, like iceland, they think the foreign investors who brought the crisis on should be the ones that have to suck it up.

  4. Greece is a third world country with an attitude. The workers are acting like first class jerks and if I didn't know better, I'd swear that Sid Ryan and Mark Ferguson and David Miller were leading the Big Fat Greek protest.

  5. Will Ontario, with the UNION Premier McGuinty, be next?

  6. Their Government is broke, what else can they do?

  7. Lots of ignorance on display here. Unions do not destroy economies, bankers do – every single time. This type of behaviour will be on full display by our neighbours to the south when the shit hits the fan at some point this year. The US economy will collapse, and the "middle class" and those living in poverty will feel the brunt. Hard to say how acutely we'll be affected in Canada.

  8. I'll try again…

    Lots of ignorance on display here. Unions do not destroy economies – bankers do, every single time. This kind of behaviour will be on full display by our neighbours to the south when the excrement (can I say excrement?) hits the fan at some point this year. The US economy is going to collapse, and the "middle class" and those already in abject poverty will feel the brunt of it. Hard to say how acutely we will be affected here.

    • Point well made…and taken.

    • Can you please explain how the Greek government's spending problem is caused by bankers?

      I'm not saying its a union issue, but if the government is spending more than it is taking in, it needs to cut costs. That means that it's employees are going to get pay cuts, and program spending is going to get reduced. What would you like to see them do instead?

      • At the root of all financial problems you will find bankers. They lobby (i.e. bribe, coerce) governments to allow fiscal conditions (regulations, legislation, base interest rate levels) that, while seemingly sustainable in the short term, create bubbles that any sound economist knows will eventually break, with catastrophic results. The latest crash has even demonstrated that the very architects of the crash, which has had global impact, rather than taking losses and going bankrupt, were rewarded with interest free government money to pump up another bubble. The gravy train NEVER STOPS for the elite.

        Back to the Greece situation in particular. First of all, the EU and its Euro was set up exclusively for the benefit of rich bankers and transnational corporations. There may have been some ancillary benefits to some more common folk, but those were coincidental. No country can survive in the long-term without a sovereign central bank. These austerity measures are being imposed at the behest of Brussels and the IMF. Lots of coulda shoulda woulda, but things like this are bound to happen when a country sells its soul to private banks, trade agreements, and fiat currencies.

        • But that doesn't really answer my question, does it?

          The Greek economy remains above the Euro average in terms of growth. The problem is overspending on the part of the government. Getting upset that overlending may have exacerbated the issue, doesn't solve the problem. The only way to solve the problem is to cut spending.

          If you want to fix banking regulations after the economy is fiscally sound, that's fine, but you have to get sound fiscal policy first.

  9. Maybe Canadians need to take a good look at themselves and their country's interferences into other people'scountries before they make comments about others. Afterall, their history is full of violence and land grab!

    I think Yves Engler's lecture on youtube would be a good place to start,http://www.youtube.com/watch?=Dgbrt7NJCtg, "Black book of Canadian foreign policy".