Will CEO's firing prompt exodus from Alberta Health Services board? - Macleans.ca
 

Will CEO’s firing prompt exodus from Alberta Health Services board?

‘I don’t think that eating a cookie and not speaking to reporters is grounds for termination’


 

Two of the 14 members of Alberta’s Health Services board—Tony Franceschini and Dr. Andreas Laupacis of Toronto—have said they are considering resigning from their posts in the aftermath of the board decision’s to let CEO Stephen Duckett go. Duckett was sacked following his refusal to talk to reporters about a meeting on the province’s ER crisis, saying he was too busy eating a cookie. “The last few days have been difficult for all of us,” reads an e-mail from Laupacis, executive director at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael’s Hospital. “Given the importance of AHS, I will be taking time to carefully consider whether I will remain on the board or resign.” Gord Bontje of Red Deer, another board member, has already resigned in protest. Bontje said Duckett had done a credible job after inheriting a difficult situation, and that he had been working on the long emergency waits and seniors care long before the issue came to the public’s attention. As for the infamous cookie comments? “I don’t think that eating a cookie and not speaking to reporters is grounds for termination,” Bontje said. How the other board members decide to proceed may hinge on that same question.

Edmonton Journal


 
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Will CEO’s firing prompt exodus from Alberta Health Services board?

  1. Does anybody care about this whole cookie-affair. Apparently not!

    • Albertans? No? Where you from?

  2. The press can be very irritating at times. They never take no for an answer. They are paid to extract whatever they can. Fired for the cookie incident is shooting a fly with an elephant gun.

    • After a day-long meeting dedicated to solving a serious problem within Alberta Health Services, they wanted to hear from the man who headed Alberta Health Services. Maybe they wouldn't have taken no for an answer, but Duckett didn't say 'no' or 'no comment' or 'there will be a press conference at such-and-such-place-and-time.' Quite inexplicably, he decided instead that that was the perfect time to behave like a child.
      I think his firing was largely unwarranted and even counterproductive, but I also think that when a person makes just such a public display of how not up to a task he or she is, that's the risk they run.

      • Not that I want to defend the guy, but he did say there was going to be a press conference in about 30 minutes at approx 1:12 of this clip http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5DxeCK5Ne_Q

  3. I guess the real question is did the politicians that fired him act in the best interests of the people they pretend to represent, or was this something else? Perhaps that is the real story here, no doubt totally missed by the press.