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Women’s group loses federal funding

Ottawa-based non-profit ran leadership programs in Africa


 

The Ottawa-based women’s aid organization Match International can no longer count on getting federal dollars to finance its activities. It was revealed Thursday that Ottawa has cut the non-profit organization loose after 34 years, saying performance issues were to blame for the elimination of a government subsidy that provided Match International with 75 per cent of its operating budget. The group, which runs programs that help women gain leadership skills and start their own businesses in countries such as Ghana, Mali and Tanzania, is unsure of how it will keep those programs alive without government money. Match International executive director Kim Bulger called the Canadian International Development Agency’s move “disingenuous” and accused CIDA of having done it for “political” reasons.

CBC News


 
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Women’s group loses federal funding

  1. If an NGO is not demonstrating results, or is not being managed cost effectively, funders like CIDA should inform them as soon as possible, and provide recommendations for improvement. If CIDA was accountable, and MI repeatedly did not produce the desired outcomes, then CIDA certainly has to right to revoke funding. Accountability works both ways.

    I can't help but think this is part of the CPC's foreign policy on maternal and child health. MI must be directly or indirectly in support of the right to choose abortion.

  2. In my humble opinion, we'd be far better off running programs that help everyone, male or female, gain leadership skills and start their own businesses in countries such as Ghana, Mali, and Tanzania. Limiting a program to women only is both counter-productive and bigoted.

    • Gaunilon, in countries such as Tanzania, women's rights are almost non-existent. Government's feign desires to improve the situation, but don't enforce anything. Women get used and abused, their education levels fall far below those of their male counterparts, and they cannot inherit or own property. Now, who needs programs to support them so they can pull themselves out of the brutality that is thrust upon them, when the average number of children they have is 6?

      When women are treated equaly in these countries, your humble opinion on this matter may seem reasonable. At present, it is very ureasonable.

      • The way to combat that is to go to the root of the problem: teach everyone that women are people rather than things to be used for pleasure.

        Running programs that only help women accomplish two things:
        (1) they unnecessarily limit the entrepreneurs they'll help, thus reducing their impact, and
        (2) they build bitterness and resentment among the many hard-working men who are trying to support wives and children.

        Neither of these are good. When people are being mistreated you fight the mistreatment, you don't counter it by reverse mistreatment.

      • Do you think that starting a revolution in Ghana, Mali, or Tansania would change the topic? At least your willingness to fight for changing rules is just one inch away from it.

  3. Are there numbers available to back-up the assertion that the group's performance has fallen short of targets needed to continue being funded? They would be most informative in order to postulate an informed opinion.

  4. Having lived in Africa, programs that assist women are essential. In many African countries, women are treated as chattel and do not have the rights that are enjoyed by women in developed nations. Dealing with issues like genital mutilation, sexual rights and literacy are particularly important. It is also important to teach African women how to be self-sustaining by helping them develop micro-businesses and micro-farms. From what I have seen on the Match International website, this is exactly what they were attempting to do.

    If Match International's finances are suspect as the government insists and since they are a non-profit organization, the federal government could provide them with the financial counselling necessary so that they can meet CIDA's standards.

    My suspicion is that this is just another example of how the Harper government regards the rights of women around the world.
    http://viableopposition.blogspot.com/

  5. Having lived in Africa, programs that assist women are essential. In many African countries, women are treated as chattel and do not have the rights that are enjoyed by women in developed nations. Dealing with issues like genital mutilation, sexual rights and literacy are particularly important. It is also important to teach African women how to be self-sustaining by helping them develop micro-businesses and micro-farms. From what I have seen on the Match International website, this is exactly what they were attempting to do.

    If Match International's finances are suspect as the government insists and since they are a non-profit organization, the federal government could provide them with the financial counselling necessary so that they can meet CIDA's standards.

    My suspicion is that this is just another example of how the Harper government regards the rights of women around the world.
    http://viableopposition.blogspot.com/

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